CWS Blog

blog navigation

blog posts

  • IPRH Panel: The Future of Authorship

    Panel: The Future of Authorship (Brown Bag Lunch)
    Date: February 22, 2013
    Time: 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
    Location: IPRH, Humanities Lecture Hall

    About the event:
    This panel will examine recently developed forms of scholarly communication, focusing on the ways scholars now create knowledge and communicate their findings to a range of audiences using innovative digital platforms and tools for conducting research, writing, and publishing. The aim of this panel is to explore the intellectual advances afforded by new modes of authorship, peer review, and publishing. Please join us for a panel discussion featuring the following speakers:

    Nicholas Mirzoeff (Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University);
    Kevin Hamilton (Associate Professor of Art and Design, and IPRH Coordinator of Digital Scholarly Communication, UIUC);
    Eduardo Ledesma (Assistant Professor of Spanish, UIUC)
    Jodee Stanley (Editor, Ninth Letter)

    Please bring your lunch. Cookies and beverages will be provided.

  • IPRH lecture Richard Graff

    Richard Graff 
(Writing Studies, University of Minnesota)

    
“Spaces of Oratorical Performance in Ancient Greece:  Reconstruction, Interpretive Visualization, and Assessment”


    Date: January 30, 2013


    Time: 4:30 p.m.


    Location: 1000 Lincoln Hall



    This event is free and open to the public.

    
About this event:

This talk will present chief findings of a long-term collaborative, interdisciplinary study of the physical settings in which ancient Greeks practiced the art of rhetoric. These include a variety spaces and structures from the late-Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods (ca. 500-100 BCE) utilized throughout the Greek world as venues for the performance of formal oratory-- principally, buildings that housed meetings of city councils (bouleuteria), auditoria utilized for larger citizen assemblies, and various structures fitted for use as law courts. In addition to providing a much-needed synthesis of the archaeological, literary, and historical evidence for these spaces and structures, the study utilizes both traditional and emergent research methods to elucidate the ways in which the physical settings structured communicative (inter)action and group deliberation.  3D digital modeling and other forms of advanced visualization have been utilized to identify salient architectural-spatial and acoustical variables and to assess them in terms of the opportunities and challenges they presented to both speakers and audiences.

    The talk will summarize the inventory of speaking sites considered in the study and the methods of analysis and interpretation utilized in it. It will then illustrate these methods by considering a few significant but neglected structures, and a single well-known, but enigmatic one -- the meeting place of the Athenian assembly called the Pnyx.

additional blog information