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Event Detail Information

Event Detail Information

New Directions Lecture - Reinventing Russia: Modernist Myth-Making and National Self-Identity, 1898-1914

Speaker Nina Gourianova, Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Northwestern University
Date Apr 24, 2014
Time 4:00 pm  
Location 101 International Studies Building (910 S. Fifth Street, Champaign)
Cost Free and open to the public
Sponsor Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center; Art History Program; Department of History; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Event type Lecture
Views 68

This presentation frames the immanent impact the cultural tradition and innovation in Russia had on the development of national self-identity as well as on the shaping of Russian Modernist aesthetics in the early 20th century, from Diaghilev's Ballets Russes to the Futurist art and poetry.

Nina Gurianova (Gourianova) is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Northwestern University. Her scholarship in the fields of literature and art history encompasses both Russian and European modernist and avant-garde movements, with a specific emphasis on the interrelation and mutual influence of aesthetics and politics. Gourianova served as the primary curatorial consultant to the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) on the exhibition of Russian Futurist and Constructivist books in 2002, and participated in the organization of many exhibitions, including "Amazons of the Avant-garde" and "Kazimir Malevich" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and “Cubisti e Cubismo” in Rome (2013). She has published extensively in Europe, the United States and Russia. Her most recent book, The Aesthetics of Anarchy (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012), won the 2013 AATSEEL (American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages) Best Book in Literary/Cultural Studies annual award. It explores the question of art and ideology in the pre-revolutionary Russian avant-garde.