Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH)

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“Hidden Histories” Campus Tours - Urbana Tour

Event Type
Other
Sponsor
IPRH, Public History and Student Research IPRH Research Cluster
Location
All tours start from the Quad side of Henry Admin building
Date
Oct 10, 2016   5:00 pm  
Contact
Kathryn J Oberdeck
E-Mail
kjo@illinois.edu
Views
156

This tour is a project of a "research cluster" on public history, funded by the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities and convened by students and faculty from a range of departments at UIUC and history practitioners from the broader community.   We are inspired to explore the forms of public meaning-making that shape our own campus spaces, and that shape the relationship between our university and the publics it was founded to serve. Our goal is to explore, document, and promote hidden and forgotten stories and persons connected to our campus and the wider Champaign-Urbana community. Sites include the School of Labor and Employment Relations, the original site of La Cultural Latina, Coble Hall, Illini Union, The Quad, the Main Library an the Cultural Centers on Nevada Street.

All tours start from the Quad side of Henry Admin building. Tours will take place at the following days and times: 

 

Monday Oct. 10 5 PM  URBANA TOUR

Thursday Oct. 13 Noon  CHAMPAIGN TOUR

Friday Oct 14  2 PM CHAMPAIGN TOUR

Saturday Oct. 15  11 AM  URBANA TOUR

 

The two different tours are as follows:

The URBANA tour  includes histories of uses of the quad for student struggle, the importance of the Union to student movements an especially project 500; the protests at Illinois Street Residence when the first Project 500 students came to campus, and discussions of the histories and roles of the Ethnic Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and the Cultural houses on Nevada street.

The CHAMPAIGN tour will include  histories of uses of the quad for student struggle, the importance of the library as a site of history telling as well as past discrimination, the Armory as a site of protests about the Chief, the old La Casa and its murals, and Coble hall as the site of the early campus Y, and the campus experiences of Dorothy Day, who lived there, studied at U of I, and went on to found the Catholic Workers Movement.

 

Organized by the Public History and Student Research IPRH Research Cluster.

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