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Noontime Scholars Lecture: Cadra McDaniel, "Politics in the World of Art: Representations of Russia in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries"

Event Type
Lecture
Sponsor
REEEC
Location
Lucy Ellis Lounge (1080 Foreign Languages Building), 707 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana
Date
Jun 27, 2017   12:00 pm  
Speaker
Cadra McDaniel (Assistant Professor of Liberal Studies, Texas A&M University - Central Texas)
Cost
Free and open to the public.
E-Mail
reec@illinois.edu
Phone
217-333-1244
Views
39
Originating Calendar
Russian, E. European & Eurasian Center: Speakers

Amid late tsarist Russia’s tumultuous political debates, some Miriskusniki visually proclaimed their sentiments. An in-depth examination of the Miriskusniki’s specific ideologies, subjects chosen, and artistic styles indicates that these artists utilized their talents to depict pressing domestic concerns and to portray Russia’s relationship to Western Europe.  Moreover, the tension between the Miriskusniki’s and the Peredvizhniki’s supporters attests to the Miriskusniki’s instrumental role in offering powerful and influential visual commentaries about their country’s immediate concerns and long-term development.  The World of Art exhibitions, 1898-1906, demonstrate that some Miriskusniki’s creations embody competing notions of political and national identity, thereby serving as visual accounts of late tsarist Russia’s vibrant arts and contentious politics.

 

Cadra Peterson McDaniel is an Assistant Professor of History/Liberal Studies at Texas A&M University-Central Texas. She is the Coordinator for the Master of Science in Liberal Studies program, and the faculty sponsor for Phi Alpha Theta. Her primary areas of interest include Russian and European foreign affairs and culture in the late 19th century and the 20th century. Also, she is interested in contemporary Russian foreign policy.  Among her publications is the book, American-Soviet Cultural Diplomacy: The Bolshoi Ballet’s American Premiere. Currently, she is researching the intersection of the visual arts and politics in late tsarist Russia.

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