Campus Highlights

Campus Highlights

  • 4/15/2014
    Researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years – even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks.
  • 4/8/2014
    This is a list of the materials sealed into a time capsule, which will be placed in the base of the Alma Mater statute when it is returned to campus on April 9, 2014.
  • 4/7/2014
    A labor dispute serves the NCAA’s interests better than an antitrust lawsuit, which could potentially cost the governing body for college athletes millions of dollars in monetary damages, says a University of Illinois expert in labor relations and collective bargaining in athletics.
  • 3/31/2014
    Researchers report they can generate human motor neurons from stem cells much more quickly and efficiently than previous methods allowed. The finding, described in Nature Communications, will aid efforts to model human motor neuron development, and to understand and treat spinal cord injuries and motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
  • 3/20/2014
    Gillen D’Arcy Wood, a professor of English, is the author of “Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World,” which documents the aftereffects of an 1815 volcanic eruption, the largest in recorded history. Consequences included climatic cooling, a worldwide cholera pandemic, a boom in opium production and an economic depression in the U.S.
  • 3/17/2014
    Many characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders can be identified by the age of 2 and are predictive of which children will be diagnosed with these disorders when they’re older, a new study suggests.
  • 3/14/2014
    Professor Bill Hammack looks at the engineering behind a flight "black box." In designing an object an engineer must choose the proper material. Never is this more important than in the "black box" flight data recorder
  • 3/12/2014
    The University of Birmingham has strengthened its links with North America by announcing the establishment of a strategic alliance with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/5/2014
    About half of Latinos check “white” in response to the question about race on the U.S. Census. About half check “other race.” Their choice of “white” or “other race” may have little to do with their skin color, their use of English or Spanish, or their comfort within the larger culture, contrary to common assumptions, says Julie A. Dowling, a University of Illinois professor of Latina and Latino studies.
  • 3/3/2014
    New evidence establishes for the first time that Cahokia, a sprawling, pre-Columbian city situated at the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, hosted a sizable population of immigrants.
  • 2/26/2014
    Low doses of the soy isoflavone genistein change estrogen-responsive breast tumor cells to a more aggressive, less treatable form of cancer, suggests new research by Juan Andrade and William Helferich, both professors in the department of food science and human nutrition.
  • 2/14/2014
    With no coaches, scholarships, or grand masters—trademarks of today’s powerhouse university chess teams—the club is sending a team to the national “Final Four” tournament for the second year in a row.
  • 2/12/2014
    Plastic shopping bags, an abundant source of litter on land and at sea, can be converted into diesel, natural gas and other useful petroleum products, researchers report.
  • 2/6/2014
    Look out, super glue and paint thinner. Thanks to new dynamic materials developed at the University of Illinois, removable paint and self-healing plastics soon could be household products.
  • 1/31/2014
    After a method for using tree pulp to make paper was perfected in 1890, people stopped using materials like corn stalks. “We’re going back to that and saying maybe they shouldn’t have stopped researching those fibers. Prairie grass makes some pretty amazing paper, we’ve found.”
  • 1/24/2014
    A new 3D imaging technique for live cells uses a conventional microscope to capture image slices throughout the depth of the cell, then computationally renders them into one three-dimensional image. The technique uses no dyes or chemicals, allowing researchers to observe cells in their natural state.
  • 1/21/2014
    Researchers report in a new study that several bird species – some of them relatively rare – are making extensive use of soybean fields in Illinois. The team found significantly more birds and a greater diversity of bird species nesting, roosting and feeding in no-till soybean fields than in tilled fields.
  • 1/16/2014
    The lack of contact between firms at either end of a supply chain prevents companies from gaining efficiencies in costs, design and materials, says Anupam Agrawal, a professor of business administration at Illinois.
  • 1/15/2014
    The new documentary “Life Itself,” about the life of Roger Ebert, will be one of the 12 films shown at this year’s Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest,” coming April 23-27 to Champaign and Urbana, Ill.
  • 1/9/2014
    Illinois professor Lane Martin was honored with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.