Illinois News Bureau: Research | University of Illinois

Illinois News Bureau: Research

Illinois News Bureau: Research

  • 3/18/2015Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor
    The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 has served as the basis for the reform of many police departments in cities across the country, including Cincinnati, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. And in what’s now seen as an increasingly likely next step, Ferguson, Missouri, will undergo its own Department of Justice-administered police reforms.
  • 3/17/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A genetic study of papaya sex chromosomes reveals that the hermaphrodite version of the plant, which is of most use to growers, arose as a result of human selection, most likely by the ancient Maya some 4,000 years ago.
  • 3/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Subsistence farmers in Africa, the Americas and the Caribbean are learning how to construct raised planting beds and install drip irrigation systems to boost their agricultural productivity, conserve water and perhaps even halt the rapid advance of desertification in some drought-prone regions.
  • 3/12/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    A new molecule-making machine could do for chemistry what 3-D printing did for engineering: Make it fast, flexible and accessible to anyone.
  • 3/10/2015Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    Nearly 290,000 older adults from the U.S. volunteered abroad during 2012 – an increase of more than 60 percent in less than a decade, a recent study found.
  • 3/5/2015Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor
    Although development aid is commonly seen as an important tool in the quest to reduce poverty in conflict-riven countries, new research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in development economics concludes that large-scale foreign aid programs can backfire and actually exacerbate violence in some long-running conflicts.