Illinois News Bureau: Research | University of Illinois

Illinois News Bureau: Research

Illinois News Bureau: Research

  • 12/9/2014Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    When a large protein unfolds in transit through a cell, it slows down and can get stuck in traffic. Using a specialized microscope - a sort of cellular traffic camera - University of Illinois chemists now can watch the way the unfolded protein diffuses.
  • 12/9/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Five University of Illinois scholars have received National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2015. The U. of I. is the only institution to be awarded more than three of the fellowships for the coming year.
  • 12/8/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    Older Latinos living in the U.S. who perceive their neighborhoods as safer and more walkable are less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms, and the effect may be long term, a new study suggests.
  • 12/8/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A new publication, “Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death,” looks at new research into the plague and its historical significance. The publication is the inaugural issue of a new journal, “The Medieval Globe,” sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.
  • 12/8/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    When the U.S. House of Representatives convenes in January, adopting rules of procedure will be among the first orders of business. Pretty mundane stuff, it would seem. Pay attention, though, says Gisela Sin, the author of a new book that analyzes over a century of House procedural rule-making, up through 2013. Those rules, written by the majority party, will have a huge impact on what follows in Washington over the next two years.
  • 12/1/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The house mouse, stickleback fish and honey bee appear to have little in common, but at the genetic level these creatures respond in strikingly similar ways to danger, researchers report. When any of these animals confronts an intruder, the researchers found, many of the same genes and brain gene networks gear up or down in response.