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UIC Office of Career Services

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UIC Office of Career Services
Student Services Building,
Suite 3050
1200 West Harrison Street
(M/C 099)
Chicago, Illinois 60607-3344
Phone: (312) 996-2300
Fax: (312) 413-0383

EMAIL ID:
ocs@uic.edu

OFFICE HOURS:
M-F : 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

WEBSITE:
http;//careers.ocs.uic.edu

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Office of Career Services

  • 7/23/2014

    Consultants involved in implementing healthcare IT solutions are generally happier with their work than their full-time counterparts, according to a survey by Atlanta-based staffing firm Healthcare IT Leaders. More than three quarters—77 percent—of the consultants said they were either “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with their jobs, the survey found. That compares to 64 percent of full-time healthcare IT employees. To put the numbers in context, other surveys have found that 72 percent of workers across all industries report similar… continue...

    The post Healthcare IT Consultants Happier Than Full-Timers appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/23/2014

    Mobile developers who want to make money should consider building enterprise apps: Those who target enterprise customers are twice as likely to earn real money as those going after consumers or professionals, according to a report from app and mobile researcher VisionMobile. The report, The State of the Developer Nation Q3 2014, says that more than two thirds of mobile app developers focus on consumers, 16 percent target the enterprise and 11 percent target professionals. The developers of enterprise apps… continue...

    The post Mobile Developers Find Money in the Enterprise appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/23/2014

    Recruiters can be a big help when you’re looking for a job. They’re an excellent source of market intelligence and the experts who know how to get your resume in front of elusive hiring managers. But with dozens of them to choose from, how can you tell which recruiter is right for you? The short answer is by learning as much about them as you can. To start, ask these questions early on. What’s your niche or specialty? IT recruiters… continue...

    The post 10 Questions to Ask a Recruiter Before You Sign On appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/23/2014

    Recently, the International Game Developers Association reported that 40 percent of the respondents to its Developer Satisfaction Survey hold an undergraduate college degree, while 20 percent have a graduate degree and 15 percent hold some kind of trade diploma. A little over half have taken supplemental training in game design in either high school or college. By the numbers, then, it would appear degrees count when it comes to building a career in games. But how much? Click here to… continue...

    The post Do You Need a Degree to Work in Games? appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/23/2014

    Tip of the Day When you’re a software engineer, the resume is a tricky beast. It can describe the technologies you’ve worked with, but can’t say what you were able to do with them or show a hiring manager how well-structured your code is or how scalable your designs are. Hiring managers want to know how you produce software, preferably in an environment like the one they’re going to put you in. Additionally, they need to know that you can… continue...

    The post Have Code to Go Along With Your Resume appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/22/2014

    Over at HTML5Report.com, Steve Anderson is wondering if D is the next big programming language. D took form when Walter Bright and Andrei Alexandrescu combined their efforts to develop a new language back in 2005. The result, says Anderson, offers some “very exciting” possibilities, and he notes that the ad-tech firm Sociomantic Labs, recently acquired by Tesco for $200 million, used D to build its online system. Making things more interesting is another online company’s interest in D: Facebook. Click… continue...

    The post Is There a Future in Programming D? appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/22/2014

    In the relatively brief time it’s been around, the Chief Information Security Officer’s job has developed into a pressured, thankless existence. These are the executives charged with keeping an organization’s systems secure in the face of mounting cyberattacks, careless vendors, and employees who are more concerned with using their own iPhones than keeping company data secure. “This job is not for the fainthearted,” David Jordan, CISO for Virginia’s Arlington County, told The New York Times. Click here to find CISO… continue...

    The post Companies Feel Pressure to Hire CISOs appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/22/2014

    Love it or fear it, the trend toward building more sophisticated robots isn’t going to abate any time soon. Indeed, given their potential to impact everything from transportation to medicine, the need for engineers skilled in robotics is bound to increase. A tidbit: Mechanical engineering ranked fifth on the National Association of Colleges and Employers’ list of most in-demand bachelor’s degrees. So where do you learn to build robots? Business Insider put together a list of 10 universities where you… continue...

    The post 10 Top College Robotics Programs appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/22/2014

    Tip of the Day You don’t have to be the life of the party to have a vibrant network. Select the formats and venues where you’re the most comfortable, and get the ball rolling by building a small circle of contacts. If you’re uncomfortable by yourself, go with a friend or colleague. That way, you can break the ice by making introductions and engaging in small group conversations. You may find it’s easier to get started by remembering that everyone’s… continue...

    The post 2 Networking Tricks for Shy People appeared first on Dice News.

  • 7/22/2014

    Ernst & Young, also known as “EY,” is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. The company has about 175,000 employees in over 150 countries, some 54,000 of whom are in the Americas. Currently, more than 4,000 professionals work in EY’s IT operations. “At EY, we have many opportunities for individuals with backgrounds in technology in all of our service lines,” says Larry Nash, EY Americas director of experienced & executive recruiting. Primarily a Microsoft shop, the… continue...

    The post How to Land a Job at Ernst & Young appeared first on Dice News.

  • Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com writer Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com by Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com published by Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com

    Going by titles like ultrasound technician, cardiac sonographer and vascular technologist, diagnostic medical sonographers perform different functions with one common purpose: They provide a window to the inside workings of the body and play a critical role in helping physicians evaluate, diagnose and treat patients.

    At a time in which Americans are living longer and chronic health conditions are on the rise, demand for diagnostic medical sonographers is expected to climb an impressive 46 per....

  • Kevin Knapp, CFO of CareerBuilder writer Kevin Knapp, CFO of CareerBuilder by Kevin Knapp, CFO of CareerBuilder published by Kevin Knapp, CFO of CareerBuilder

    Nearly half of financial services companies are struggling to fill certain positions, despite plenty of potential candidates that could have a positive impact in these roles. According to a new survey by MoneyJobs.com, CareerBuilder's job site for finance and accounting professionals, 47 percent of financial services firms have open positions for which they can't find qualified candidates and 49 percent cite a skills deficit as a reason for vacancies.

    Financial services organizations require a high caliber of employees due to the technical expertise required and the high impact information they deal with, but the fact that almost half of financial services companies grappling with a hiring issue requires a deeper look. For job seekers, becoming aware of and overcoming the concerns of these hiring managers is the most ef....

  • Mary Lorenz, CareerBuilder writer writer Mary Lorenz, CareerBuilder writer by Mary Lorenz, CareerBuilder writer published by Mary Lorenz, CareerBuilder writer

    Watch out, hard skills and technical know-how: You've got competition. According to a new CareerBuilder survey, the vast majority (77 percent) of employers consider soft skills just as important as hard skills when it comes to evaluating candidates for a job, and 16 percent even say they're more important.

    What are soft skills? As my colleague pointed out recently, soft skills typically describe "communication, leadership, critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, team skills, relationship management and a long list of other so-called intangible traits." Though they are hard to measure quantitatively, soft skills remain a sought after trait and recognized business differentiator among employers.

    Perhaps the heavy focus on soft skills has to do with the fact that employers have been strug....

  • Adrienne Erin writer Adrienne Erin by Adrienne Erin published by Adrienne Erin

    If you already have a Twitter account, no doubt you already know the great value of this social media platform. But did you know that you can turn your twitter into a valuable resource for your industry? It's true; you can, and there are plenty of reasons why you should want to do this. Creating an industry resource with your Twitter builds your reputation and helps you gain influence. Here are the steps to follow to make this happen.

    Find jobs | Post your résumé

    Make a list of influencers<....

  • Robert Half International writer Robert Half International by Robert Half International published by Robert Half International

    Modern accounting encompasses a wide array of specialized tasks, from standard bookkeeping and tax filing to fraud examination and regulatory compliance. You learn something about almost every aspect of the field when you earn a bachelor's degree in accounting. But without much experience, it's hard to know whether the corporate or public accounting career path is right for you. And if you want to become a certified public accountant (CPA), work history is important, as the vast majority of states require at least one year of accounting experience before taking the final exam.

    So, how do you know which accounting career path to start down? Here are a couple of things to consider:

  • Kim Monaghan writer Kim Monaghan by Kim Monaghan published by Kim Monaghan

    In our new economy, many employees are rethinking retirement due to limited raises, drops in healthcare coverage, and wavering pensions. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the labor force participation rate of workers 55 and up will continue to grow reaching 43 percent by 2018 and 22 percent for those 65 and over.

    Find jobs | Post your résumé

    Additionally, The Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College follows continued trends of older workers staying employed or re-entering the workforce even after retirement. Is it all financially driven? Not nece....

  • Lisa Brown Morton, CEO of Nonprofit HR writer Lisa Brown Morton, CEO of Nonprofit HR by Lisa Brown Morton, CEO of Nonprofit HR published by Lisa Brown Morton, CEO of Nonprofit HR

    As of April 2014, 3.5 million people have been jobless for 27 weeks or more, a truly staggering number. While many recent articles have addressed the problem of long-term unemployment, few have offered solutions. And of those that have, one potential solution has been notably overlooked -- the nonprofit sector.

    If you're unemployed yourself, you'd be wise to consider the potential that nonprofits hold for your next job, and if you're a nonprofit employer, seeking your next hire from the talent pool that exists among the unemployed might be one of the smartest moves you can make.

    An April 18 article from The Washington Post explains that the long-term unemployed have difficulty not only finding a job but also keeping one. The latest resear....

  • David Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Klout Fire writer David Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Klout Fire by David Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Klout Fire published by David Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Klout Fire

    Richard Branson has built an empire around the phrase "Screw it, let's do it."

    The multimillionaire says that, when presented with an opportunity, many people say "no" or "let me think about it" because they are "overcautious" or "suspicious" of new ideas -- or they simply need time to think. Branson, on the other hand, is eager to dive in headfirst and figure out logistics later.  

    "What is worse," Branson asks, "Making the occasional mistake or having a closed mind and missing opportunities?"

    As most born entrepreneurs would agree, the benefits of trying new things far outweigh the risk of making a mistake.

    Find jobs....

  • Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com writer Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com by Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com published by Maryalene LaPonsie, OnlineDegrees.com
    "Instead of putting people on our couches, we put organizations on our couches," says Dr. Lori Wieters, an industrial-organizational psychologist -- or I/O psychologist as they are called -- from Arizona. But make no mistake, these professionals aren't therapists. Their work has more in common with business intelligence than with health care. For those seeking a dynamic work environment that lets them flex their problem-solving muscles, industrial-organizational psychology deserves a closer look. Hottest job of the next decade "I/O psychology is growing as a field because more and more organizations are becoming aware of the fact we can help them become more productive and efficient," says Mario Casa de Calvo, an assistant professor of psychology at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota. In a global marketplace, where competitive edges may be few and far between, industrial-organizational psychologists can be the key to ensuring a business is working at maxi....
  • Jon Fortenbury, Schools.com writer Jon Fortenbury, Schools.com by Jon Fortenbury, Schools.com published by Jon Fortenbury, Schools.com

    So there you are, interning at a company in your desired field, and all they've assigned to you so far are monotonous tasks like fetching coffee or sorting papers. Probably not what you were expecting. Many of us have been there, and there are a variety of ways of going about handling it, some undoubtedly better than others.

    Find jobs | Post your résumé

    Here are three ways to handle an internship where you're not doing relevant work or learning relevant lessons.

    1. Find a way to brag about it on your résumé
    ....

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