nano@illinois news

nano@illinois news

  • 1/17/2017
    Researchers have developed the first artificial red blood cells designed to emulate vital functions of natural red blood cells. If confirmed safe for use in humans, the nanotechnology-based product could represent an innovative alternative to blood transfusions that would be especially valuable on the battlefield and in other situations where donated blood is difficult to obtain or store.
  • 1/3/2017
    Topological insulators, an exciting, relatively new class of materials, are capable of carrying electricity along the edge of the surface, while the bulk of the material acts as an electrical insulator. Practical applications for these materials are still mostly a matter of theory, as scientists probe their microscopic properties to better understand the fundamental physics that govern their peculiar behavior.
  • 12/21/2016
    Associate Professor Lynford L Goddard was honored with the 2016 Leadership in Diversity Larine Y. Cowan “Make a Difference Award” at the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Access (ODEA) 31st Annual Celebration of Diversity.
  • 12/19/2016
    CNST affiliated faculty Can Bayram's (Electrical and Computer Engineering) NSF CAREER proposal titled "Cubic Phase Green Light Emitting Diodes for Advanced Solid State Lighting" has been awarded a 2017 NSF CAREER Award, which includes Green LED research, and hosting Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) and Teachers (RETs).
  • 12/15/2016
    Dipanjan Pan, Bioengineering assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is a recipient of the 2016 NML Researcher Award, sponsored by the journal of Nano-Micro Letters (NML). The award recognizes 15 outstanding researchers whose research fields are nano and micro science, with special consideration for those who have continuously made outstanding contributions to the development of science in the last three years.
  • 12/14/2016
    Professor Iwona Jasiuk has been named the recipient of the 2016 American Advanced Materials Award from the International Association of Advanced Materials. She was selected “due to your notable and outstanding contribution in the field of ‘Advanced Materials Science and Technology,’” according to Professor Ashutosh Tiwari, the association’s secretary general.
  • 12/14/2016
    In a sweeping perspective article published this month in the journal Nature, a trio of Beckman researchers review the field they pioneered more than a decade-and-a-half ago and look at the future of autonomous polymers.
  • 12/13/2016
    "A Metal-free Electrocatalyst for Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Multi-carbon Hydrocarbons and Oxygenates" was published December 13, 2016 in Nature Communications, and includes co-author Paul Kenis (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering).
  • 12/12/2016
    Rohit Bhargava, a Founder Professor of Engineering and Chemistry at Illinois, has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award in recognition of his pioneering work in the development of infrared spectroscopic imaging, and its application to life sciences research.
  • 12/12/2016
    Gregory Stillman Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Jean-Pierre Leburton has been selected by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for IEEE Life Membership. This special honor is awarded to individuals in the association who have exhibited leadership, volunteerism and dedication to advancing technology for humanity. Life Member Status recognizes Leburton’s outstanding achievements and research that have made a significant impact on the growth and development of IEEE.
  • 12/9/2016
    Leveraging up to $70 million in federal funding…and an additional $70 million in private cost-share commitments from over 130 partners, the Rapid Advancement in Process Intensification Deployment (RAPID) Institute will focus on developing breakthrough technologies to boost domestic energy productivity and energy efficiency by 20 percent in five years through manufacturing processes in industries such oil and gas, pulp and paper and various domestic chemical manufacturers.
  • 12/7/2016
    University of Illinois Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering Professor Brian Cunningham’s Nano Sensors group has invented a novel live-cell imaging method that could someday help biologists better understand how stem cells transform into specialized cells and how diseases like cancer spread. Their Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscope (PCEM) is capable of monitoring and quantitatively measuring cell adhesion, a critical process involved cell migration, cell differentiation, cell division, and cell death.
  • 12/5/2016
    Researchers have developed the first artificial red blood cells designed to emulate vital functions of natural red blood cells. If confirmed safe for use in humans, the nanotechnology-based product could represent an innovative alternative to blood transfusions that would be especially valuable on the battlefield and in other situations where donated blood is difficult to obtain or store.
  • 12/2/2016
    Two recent studies by UIUC researchers, Feng and Holonyak, are expected to significantly impact the fundamental modulation bandwidth for transistors and laser operations for energy-efficient high speed data transfer in optical and 5G wireless communications.
  • 12/2/2016
    Professor Iwona Jasiuk and Associate Professor Amy Wagoner Johnson have been named 2017-18 Associates in the Center for Advanced Study (CAS). Only a handful of faculty from across campus are selected each year. CAS Associate appointments provide tenured and untenured faculty with an incentive to pursue the highest level of scholarly achievement.
  • 11/30/2016
    The II-VI EpiWorks Division of II‐VI Incorporated (NASDAQ:IIVI), a leading provider of compound semiconductor epitaxial wafers, announced November 28, 2016, that it is breaking ground on a state-of-the-art production facility in Champaign, Illinois. The expansion is expected to be complete by mid-2017 and will enable a quadrupling of capacity in Champaign over the next three years.
  • 11/28/2016
    Researchers at the University of Illinois have fabricated 3-D birefringent gradient refractive index (GRIN) micro-optics by electrochemically etching preformed Si micro-structures, like square columns, PSi structures with defined refractive index profiles.
  • 11/21/2016
    Six University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members, including CNST affiliates Jianjun Cheng (Materials Science and Engineering) and Brian T. Cunningham (Electrical and Computer Engineering) have been elected 2016 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • 11/21/2016
    Congrats to Larissa del Rosario, 2016 NSF-funded nano@illinois Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) participant in the Dr. Can Bayram lab, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. del Rosario is co-author of "Investigation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on 200-mm silicon (111) substrates employing different buffer layer configurations."
  • 11/18/2016
    Eight University of Illinois researchers have been named to the Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list for 2016. The list is based on an analysis of journal article publication and citation data, an objective measure of a researcher’s influence over the past 11 years.
  • 11/15/2016
    CNST led efforts helped establish the Center for Advanced Research in Drying jointly with Worcester Polytechnic Institute and University of Illinois. The research teams will be located at FSHN and MNTL. Hao Feng is the Illinois Site Director and Irfan Ahmad is co-Site Director. Jamal Yagoobi is the Director and is based at WPI. NSF I/UCRC Program Director Raffaella Montelli opened the CARD Inaugural IAB Meeting on November 14, 2016 at Worcester, MA.
  • 11/4/2016
    A University of Illinois research team has invented a highly-efficient method for producing precision catalysts that can be used for cathode reaction in hydrogen fuel cells for automobiles. The technique promises to increase the efficiency of producing shape-controlled catalysts that could have benefits beyond the automotive industry.
  • 11/1/2016
    For his groundbreaking research, Lyding, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, recently was awarded the Foresight Institute Feynman Prize for experimental work. The Foresight Institute is a leading think tank and public interest organization focused on transformative future technologies. According to a Foresight Institute announcement, "Lyding is a pioneer in the development of STM technology and particularly hydrogen depassivation lithography."
  • 11/1/2016
    Research led by MechSE Prof. Nenad Miljkovic illustrates the development of a single-camera technique capable of providing 3D information on droplet-surface interactions through the use of focal plane manipulation.
  • 10/31/2016
    The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) announces the new 2016 National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategic Plan.
  • 10/31/2016
    University of Illinois physics professor Klaus Schulten was an innovator in the use of computational methods to study the chemical and biological processes driving living cells.
  • 10/27/2016
    On October 27, 2016 at the National Science Teachers Association Conference, the nano@illinois Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program was highlighted. This NSF-funded program contributes to developing a diverse STEM workforce. Past participants’ summer research experiences, professional development activities in nanoscale STEM fields, and module development were shared. The conference was held in Minneapolis, MN with co-authors Carrie Kouadio, Irfan Ahmad, Lynford Goddard, and Xiuling Li.
  • 10/25/2016
    Synergy is a publication of the Communications Office of the Beckman Institute. Each issue spotlights the people and science that make the Institute one of the premier facilities for interdisciplinary research in the world.
  • 10/25/2016
    In October, Illinois alumnus Mark McCollum (BSEE 1983, MSEE 1987, PhD 1990) joined the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab staff as principal research engineer. He will oversee the operation of MNTL’s cleanroom facility, including the $13 million in fabrication and metrology tools used by more than 50 faculty and 350 students across campus.
  • 10/25/2016
    In October, Illinois alumnus Mark McCollum (BSEE 1983, MSEE 1987, PhD 1990) joined the Micro + Nanotechnology Lab staff as principal research engineer. He will oversee the operation of MNTL’s cleanroom facility, including the $13 million in fabrication and metrology tools used by more than 50 faculty and 350 students across campus.
  • 10/21/2016
    Andrew Smith, Bioengineering assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is leading a team that is examining ways to alleviate obesity-related conditions. Their work is published in a recent issue of ACS Nano, and it describes a unique approach the research team developed that could point the way to innovative, highly effective treatments for those who suffer from obesity.
  • 10/18/2016
    Electrical and Computer Engineering Associate Professor Viktor Gruev, who joined the Illinois faculty in August, is well known for integrating novel nano-materials with CMOS or CCD technology to achieve very sensitive imagers. At Illinois, Gruev will continue designing new imaging sensors that can capture polarization and multi-spectral properties of light.
  • 10/17/2016
    Five of the 58 recipients of the Air Force’s Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) award hail from Engineering at Illinois. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research announced $20.8 million in grants to scientists and engineers from 41 research institutions and small businesses who submitted winning research proposals.
  • 10/17/2016
    The Franklin Institute has announced John Bardeen Endowed Chair Emeritus Nick Holonyak, Jr (BSEE '50, MS '51, PhD '54) as one of eight awardees of the coveted Benjamin Franklin Award for Electrical Engineering. The institute recognized him for the development of the first visible red laser and LED and the use of various alloys in colored light sources.
  • 10/17/2016
    The Health Care Engineering Systems Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Jump Simulation at OSF HealthCare have selected six new projects for funding through the Jump ARCHES program, which was formed in 2014 through a $50 million endowment.
  • 10/16/2016
    The outstanding ranking of Illinois in these areas is profiled in "The Best Schools" publication.
  • 10/10/2016
    A team of University of Illinois researchers from the University of Illinois Micro + Nanotechnology Lab recently created a new method of thermal management for GaN power transistors that is simple and cost effective. Through technology computer aided design, Electrical & Computer Engineering Assistant Professor Can Bayram’s group demonstrated that the thickness of the GaN layers plays a role in overheating, affecting the device’s thermal budget and ultimately its performance.
  • 10/7/2016
    The nano@illinois RET program, which contributes to developing a diverse STEM workforce, was highlighted in Peoria, IL on October 7, 2016. Past participants’ summer research experiences, professional development activities in nanoscale STEM fields, and module development were highlighted.
  • 10/4/2016
    Cecilia Leal, an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, is a recipient of the 2016 National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award. The award recognizes bold ideas from some of the nation’s most promising early-career scientists. Leal’s work aims to introduce a new paradigm in the field of nanomaterials for medicine by revealing how the nanoparticle structure affects and even dictates their capacity to deliver cargo to cells.
  • 10/1/2016
    Professor Qian Chen is recognized for her work on nanomaterials and self-assembly in the latest issue of ScienceNews.
  • 9/30/2016
    The top-ranked College of Engineering at Illinois continues to build its legacy, adding several elite-level faculty researchers to its list of Founder Professors and the first Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering. These faculty include Dr. Rashid Bashir, Bioengineering, and former CNST Co-Director; and Dr. Rohit Bhargava, Bioengineering.
  • 9/26/2016
    For the first time, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that the success of delivery of drugs from nanoparticles can be quantified inside a cell. “We can precisely tell how much drug has been released from the carrier at a given time point,” stated Dipanjan Pan, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Illinois.
  • 9/26/2016
    Anurup Ganguli, PhD student in bioengineering received this year’s First Prize of $150,000 in the Student Technology Prize for Primary Healthcare competition, administered by Massachusetts General Hospital through its Ambulatory Practice of the Future (APF) initiative. The project created by Ganguli and his team, under guidance of Professors Rashid Bashir and Brian Cunningham, “Personalized Multiplexed Molecular Diagnostics for Point-of-Care Setting,” offers a novel technology for rapid detection of infectious diseases in all primary-care settings.
  • 9/24/2016
    nano@illinois led STEM outreach activities at Science at the Market at the Urbana Farmers Market on September 24, 2016. Graduate students in the Dr. Kent Choquette lab, Zihe Gao and Harshil Dave, managed the nano@illinois booth. Visitors of all ages learned about nanotechnology concepts through hands-on activities and demonstrations.
  • 9/20/2016
    Micro and Nanotechnology Lab faculty affiliates Irfan Ahmad, Logan Liu, and Graciela Padua are members of the new NSF Center for Advanced Research in Drying, which is developing energy-efficient technologies for drying moist, porous materials.
  • 9/20/2016
    Assistant Professor SungWoo Nam has won a NASA Early Career Faculty Award for his research, “Corrugated Two-dimensional Material Enabled Flexoelectricity for Cryogenic Actuator Technology.”
  • 9/15/2016
    The University of Illinois is one of six universities the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $5 million to create and expand “academic redshirt” programs. This program will allow 800 low-income students who have promising futures in engineering the opportunity to take additional math and science courses before they begin their engineering coursework.
  • 9/15/2016
    A professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Illinois has been recognized by a global media company as one of the top young innovators in science. Ying Diao was named among MIT Technology Review’s annual list of Innovators Under 35 for her work in nanotechnology and materials. Diao joined Illinois in 2015 and is currently Dow Chemical Company Faculty Scholar in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
  • 9/13/2016
    A premier semiconductor and bionanotechnology research facility, the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab expanded its training mission this fall with the addition of the popular Undergraduate Fab Lab, which was relocated from its longtime home in Everitt Lab. The 2-year $3.7 million project involved renovating space at MNTL and moving equipment from Everitt Lab, which is undergoing its own renovation as the new home for the Bioengineering Department.
  • 9/12/2016
    Illinois professor Andrew Gerwith and graduate student Jason Varnell developed a method to isolate active catalyst nanoparticles from a mixture of iron-containing compounds, a finding that could help researchers refine the catalyst to make fuel cells more active.
  • 9/12/2016
    Reliable and ubiquitous, optical fibers carry long-distance phone calls and Internet data around the world, guide military weapon systems, underpin smart highways, and monitor deep-sea oil wells, to name just a few applications. However, silica fibers are reaching their information-carrying capacity limits because of phenomena known as nonlinear optical effects, of which there are several variants. MNTL faculty affiliate Peter Dragic is conducting research to overcome these non-linear effects, which are interactions between light and matter that limit the power output of optical fibers.
  • 9/12/2016
    A pioneer in the field of photovoltaic cell research, Professor Minjoo Larry Lee has worked on improving the efficiency and fabrication processes of solar cells for nearly 10 years. Lee recently joined the ECE Illinois and Micro + Nanotechnology Lab (MNTL) faculty, having been an electrical engineering associate professor at Yale University. - See more at: http://mntl.illinois.edu/news/article/19029#sthash.3ZRNP8w1.dpuf
  • 9/6/2016
    An instructional coach at a local school, Tatiana Stine is passionate about helping her teachers implement the Next Generation Science Standards—especially engineering. A participant in the nano@illinois RET program this past summer, she got to work with innovative nanotechnology while conducting research on graphene.
  • 9/1/2016
    In August, the National Science Foundation in conjunction with the Semiconductor Research Corporation awarded a team of engineering researchers from the University of Illinois and the University of Chicago $2.5 million to develop a chip-level photonic device technology for transporting and processing information at the chip level. The researchers, led by ECE Illinois Associate Professor John Dallesasse, will use the transistor laser as the building block for high-speed optical links and electronic-photonic digital logic circuits, enabling faster and more energy efficient chip-to-chip communications and signal/information processing.
  • 8/31/2016
    This summer 11 teachers of varying grade levels and backgrounds participated in the nano@illinois Research Experience for Teachers (RET) funded by the National Science Foundation. While participating in research in a wide range of areas, these teachers’ eyes were opened to the intricate world of nanotechnology and all the possibilities it offers.
  • 8/29/2016
    Four University of Illinois chemists, Prashant K. Jain, Jeffrey S. Moore, Catherine Jones Murphy and Ralph G. Nuzzo were among the most highly cited authors as determined by Elsevier Scopus Data. They were among the top 300 of all researchers cited. Professor Jain was among the most highly cited in Chemical Engineering. Professors Moore, Murphy and Nuzzo were cited in the Materials Science and Engineering.
  • 8/24/2016
    Qian Chen, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Illinois, has been awarded a Distinguished Visiting Fellowship by the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) to conduct research at the BP International Centre for Advanced Materials.
  • 8/15/2016
    ECE alumnus Zhida Xu and ECE Associate Professor Gang Logan Liu have introduced a revolutionary method of molecule detection that can easily answer what substances, and how much of each, are in a liquid. At first glance, FlexBrite is a thin, bendable, plastic-based wafer that shines purple in the light. At the nanoscale, however, it’s crisscrossed with tiny bumps. Xu calls these structures “nano-mushrooms,” which bend the light reflected off them and account for FlexBrite’s color-changing properties, allowing researchers to analyze liquids much more efficiently.
  • 8/15/2016
    ECE Assistant Professor Can Bayram has developed a new method for making brighter and more efficient green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Using an industry-standard semiconductor growth technique, Bayram created gallium nitride (GaN) cubic crystals grown on a silicon substrate that are capable of producing powerful green light for advanced solid-state lighting.
  • 8/11/2016
    The Health Care Engineering Systems Center (HCESC) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently received a donation from Simulated Surgical Systems LLC, a California-based robotic surgery simulation company. As part of the donation, Simulated Surgical Systems gave the HCESC a refurbished, first-generation RoSS™ Robotic Surgery Simulator.
  • 8/10/2016
    During the summer of 2016, ten undergraduate students learned about nanotechnology as part of the NSF-funded nano@illinois Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). While spending the summer performing research in the labs of some of Illinois’ premier researchers, the students not only learned a lot about the area in nanotechnology that they were studying; they learned what grad school is like and got some pointers on how to apply.
  • 8/2/2016
    An NIH-funded team of researchers recently tested a new method of delivering chemotherapy drugs for osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that affects dogs and people, typically teenagers and older adults. Their studies in dogs undergoing treatment for osteosarcoma suggest that specially engineered, bone-seeking nanoparticles might safely deliver anti-cancer drugs precisely to the places where they are most needed. These early findings come as encouraging news for the targeted treatment of inoperable bone cancers and other malignancies that spread to bone.
  • 8/2/2016
    The new Center for Advanced Research in Drying (CARD) is the first center in the United States dedicated to developing energy-efficient technologies for drying moist, porous materials, a problem affecting the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers across a wide range of industries. “Innovation is at the heart of CARD--addressing such challenges as energy conservation, climate change, product safety--and quality--using novel technologies such as micro and nanotechnology-based smart sensors and drying nozzles,”said Ahmad, Executive Director at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology
  • 8/1/2016
    Illinois professors Nancy Sottos and Andrew Gewirth developed a method to comprehensively measure the mechanical stress and strain in lithium-ion batteries. It revealed a point of stress in charging that, if addressed through new methods or materials, could lead to faster-charging batteries.
  • 8/1/2016
    Researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) and from the University of Illinois Macro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (MNTL) are collaborating in a new research theme focusing on using micro RNAs and nanotechnology to develop technologies to characterize tumors and monitor how they grow. Brian Cunningham, a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Bioengineering, and Director of the MNTL, will lead the “Omics Nanotechnology for Precision Cancer Medicine” (ONC-PM) theme. The group will work on designing tools to track material shed in the blood by tumors (biomarkers).
  • 7/29/2016
    University of Illinois Assistant Professor Can Bayram has developed a new method for making brighter and more efficient green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Using an industry-standard semiconductor growth technique, Bayram created gallium nitride (GaN) cubic crystals grown on a silicon substrate that are capable of producing powerful green light for advanced solid-state lighting.
  • 7/29/2016
    Ten undergraduate students from around the country participated in the NSF-funded Bioimaging Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). Working alongside researchers in Illinois labs, they discovered the exciting world of bioimaging research, got a taste of what graduate school is like, and some might have discovered what they want to do for the rest of their lives.
  • 7/28/2016
    In an article recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Bioengineering Assistant Professor Andrew Smith and his co-authors demonstrate a new process for using quantum dots to literally shed new light on molecular biology. Quantum dots can solve some aspects of these problems. Quantum dots — tiny nanoparticles that can have special properties — have been used in research for nearly 20 years to illuminate tissue and cells. Developing a much smaller quantum dot is the major breakthrough that Smith and his team have accomplished. They succeeded in creating the smallest stable quantum dots to date.
  • 7/28/2016
    The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative has selected a team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Michigan, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to develop and deploy new solar energy technology that will help to make solar energy cost-competitive with traditional forms of electricity by the end of the decade. Led by principal investigator Kimani Toussaint, an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Science and Engineering Department (MechSE) at Illinois, his team of researchers have received a cooperative award--one of only six awards granted nationwide--for their project on improving concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies.
  • 7/28/2016
    For the second year in a row, the “Discoveries in Bioimaging” Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), has brought 10 undergraduates from universities across the United States and Puerto Rico to the University of Illinois to learn about research.
  • 7/25/2016
    University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to etch very tall, narrow finFETs, a type of transistor that forms a tall semiconductor “fin” for the current to travel over. The etching technique addresses many problems in trying to create 3-D devices, typically done now by stacking layers or carving out structures from a thicker semiconductor wafer.
  • 7/25/2016
    At the University of Illinois, an engineer teamed up with a veterinarian to test a bone cancer drug delivery system in animals bigger than the standard animal model, the mouse. They chose dogs – mammals closer in size and biology to humans – with naturally occurring bone cancers, which also are a lot like human bone tumors. In clinical trials, the dogs tolerated the highest planned doses of cancer-drug-laden nanoparticles with no signs of toxicity. The nanoparticles also showed anti-cancer activity in mice and dogs.
  • 7/22/2016
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is well-represented 2016 List of Most Cited Researchers in Materials Science and Engineering by Elsevier Scopus Data. Among all the researchers, only the top 300 in the field of materials science and engineering are included in the list ranked by the total citations of their papers. Eleven Illinois faculty researchers, many of which focus on nanotechnology, were among the highly cited researchers that are either the corresponding author or the first author of their publications.
  • 7/22/2016
    Bio-bot research of Mechanical Engineering Graduate student Ritu Raman (whose advisor is Department Head of Bioengineering Rashid Bashir) was featured in NPR's Science Friday radio program. This segment discusses how far robotics have come in the last two decades.
  • 7/21/2016
    The Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (MNTL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign plays a significant role in solving real- world problems and helping bridge the gap between the developing and developed world. It is home to many professors who are working on breakthrough research on a wide range of topics, including optical physics, photonic systems, nanobionics, nanomedicine, lasers, bio-medicine, integrated circuits, renewable energy, and many more. Prof. Irfan Ahmad, the Executive Director at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, believes that nanotechnology has the maximum potential to make further profound impacts in the field of medical, pharma, food, and environment.
  • 7/21/2016
    Rosenberger, a researcher in Professor Bill King’s Nanoengineering Lab since 2010, was awarded the National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to work at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. “This kind of recognition reminds us all how privileged we are to have some of the best students in the world in our program,” said Anthony Jacobi, MechSE department head and Richard W. Kritzer Distinguished Professor.
  • 7/20/2016
    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering Nenad Miljkovic recently received a two-year Petroleum Research Fund Doctoral New Investigator Award from the American Chemical Society. Using advanced nanometric resolution scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques, Miljkovic will identify the fundamental mechanisms on engineered surfaces that govern fouling, corrosion, and degradation of hydrophobic and oleophobic coatings to develop next-generation coatings.
  • 7/19/2016
    New developments in the field of micromanufacturing are detailed in Assistant Professor Seok Kim’s new paper, “Microassembly of Heterogeneous Materials Using Transfer Printing and Thermal Processing,” published this week by Scientific Reports. Kim’s work introduces a new level of microassembly (termed ‘micro-LEGO’) that involves multiple materials. Previous techniques of micro-masonry—a field in which Kim is a leading scientist—only allowed a single material to be assembled at a time, building upon each other with reversible dry adhesives.
  • 7/15/2016
    Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology affiliate is "recognized for contributions to the development of high-performance vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), particularly the invention of the oxide-confined VCSEL, widely used in data-communication optical links for data centers, supercomputer applications, and the Internet."
  • 7/13/2016
    Mechanical Science and Engineering Professor Placid Ferreira's student, MechSE PhD candidate Jorge Correa, recently presented the paper, “Laminated Micro-Machine: Design and Fabrication of a Flexure-based Delta Robot” at the conference of the North American Manufacturing Research Institute and won the NAMRI/SME Outstanding Paper Award. Ferreira’s research team, the Nano-Micro Manufacturing group, develops novel scalable and non-lithographic processes that exploit chemical, mechanical, and electronic phenomena for manufacturing at the micro- and nanoscale.
  • 7/13/2016
    ElectroCyt, a technology startup from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded $5,000 in Stage 1 of the VentureWell student grant program. The ElectroCyt team has created a sepsis diagnostic tool that will improve accuracy when diagnosing. Sepsis—a life-threatening condition is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide. It occurs when harmful bacteria and their toxins enter the bloodstream through open wounds and trigger inflammatory responses throughout the body. ElectroCyt is a faster and more accurate diagnostic tool than current methods—potentially saving many lives as well as billions in healthcare costs.
  • 7/12/2016
    Emeritus and Research Professor Tai-Chang Chiang of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been elected by the Academia Sinica to its 2016 class of Academicians. He is among 22 scholars across all academic disciplines to receive this high honor this year. Chiang’s work on precision electron spectroscopy and structural determination has led to important advances in the physics of electrons, lattice structures, and phonons and their mutual interactions in solids, at surfaces, in films, and at the nanoscale.
  • 7/11/2016
    A team of top scientists from several universities, including the University of Illinois, are collaborating to develop a new class of polymers that can be used as advanced materials for batteries, energy storage, and sophisticated lightweight electronics. This work aims to repurpose the biological machinery for protein synthesis to produce precisely defined, non-natural polymeric materials.
  • 7/7/2016
    Engineering at Illinois will offer two more online professional master’s degrees this fall, as Master of Engineering degrees in bioinstrumentation and in mechanical engineering will become available to students worldwide. Illinois’ master of engineering in mechanical engineering, which also began accepting students in Fall 2015 as an on-campus program, provides students with in-depth technical knowledge for a career in industry. The degree offers students an opportunity to enhance their understanding of areas such as biomechanics, controls and dynamics, fluids and thermal sciences, nanomechanics and nanomanufacturing, solids and materials, mechanics and computation, energy systems, and many more, helping students position themselves as leaders in industry upon graduation.
  • 7/7/2016
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated doping-induced tunable wetting and adhesion of graphene, revealing new and unique opportunities for advanced coating materials and transducers. “Our study suggests for the first time that the doping-induced modulation of the charge carrier density in graphene influences its wettability and adhesion,” explained SungWoo Nam, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at Illinois.
  • 7/6/2016
    During the 2016 edition of the GLEE (Girls Learning Electrical Engineering) G.A.M.E.S. (Girls' Adventures in Mathematics, Engineering, and Science) camp, 19 campers from across the US (and even one international student) not only got their heads around what Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is like...they got their hands around it too. Some of the classes in which the girls participated involved a broad range of subjects: power and energy, optics, algorithms, nanotechnology, and solar cells, which included a lab during which the girls tested some solar cells.The idea of the camp was to expose the girls to a variety of activities that would give them a taste of what Electrical and Computer Engineering is all about.
  • 7/6/2016
    Cancer cells are able to evade a biochemical process that leads to cell death, which allows for uncontrolled cellular growth. Dipanjan Pan, Assistant Professor in Bioengineering and member of Beckman's Bioimaging Science and Technology Group, has discovered a highly selective nanotechnology-based approach that can trigger the "suicide switch" for cancer cells.
  • 6/27/2016
    Students, faculty, and staff gathered at MNTL the morning of Monday, June 27, to hear Professor Shyh-Chiang Shen (PhD ’01), visiting from the Georgia Institute of Technology, discuss III-Nitride Power Electronics. The ECE alumnus currently conducts research at the Center for Compound Semiconductors (CCS), which is led by fellow alumnus Russell Dupuis (PhD ’73, MS ’71, BSEE ’70).
  • 6/27/2016
    At Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Champaign, eighth grade students are paired up with small groups of kindergarteners to build their own bouncy balls. The older kids were trained beforehand, and guided their younger counterparts through the steps. This is part of the educational outreach Joe Muskin provides to schools not only in Champaign-Urbana, but across the state. Muskin is the education coordinator for the MechSE Department, which means he conducts engineering outreach for students from kindergarten through high school.
  • 6/27/2016
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a highly sensitive biosensor based on a differential immuno-capture technology that can detect sub-populations of white blood cells. As part of a small, disposable biochip, the microfluidic biosensor can count CD4+/CD8+ T cells quickly and accurately for AIDS diagnosis in the field. “There are 34 million people infected with HIV/AIDS worldwide, many in places that lack testing facilities,” explained Rashid Bashir, Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering, Bioengineering department head, and ECE affiliate faculty member at Illinois.
  • 6/27/2016
    A plastic embedded with nanoparticles repels sludgy shampoo, so that every last drop slides easily out of the bottle. The nanoparticles are made out of cheap silica – a component of sand – so the new material could be mass produced. Decreasing the amount of shampoo wasted would save a lot of resources, says Sushant Anand at the University of Illinois in Chicago. A percent or two of product is lost in each bottle. “If you think about just a single bottle, it would seem not a big deal,” he says. “But if you think about billions of bottles, then it all adds up and it can make a huge difference.”
  • 6/26/2016
    The Texas Instruments Design Laboratory buzzed with energy last week, as Lynford L. Goddard welcomed girls entering 10th, 11th, and 12th grades to the 2016 Girls Learning Electrical Engineering (GLEE) camp. The camp is designed to increase the students' exposure to engineering by allowing them to experience the field though the eyes of an innovator-engineer. GLEE, one of the eight tracks of Girls' Adventures in Mathematics, Engineering, and Science (GAMES) camp, is an opportunity to reframe their perceptions.
  • 6/23/2016
    Starting in Fall 2016, MechSE will offer an online version of the program. In addition, both the online and the traditional M.Eng.ME program can now be taken on a part-time basis, a great option for those who are already in the workforce and cannot take a timeout to complete an advanced degree. The M.Eng.ME industry-oriented professional degree program provides in-depth technical knowledge relevant to a wide selection of mechanical engineering career interests, including biomechanics, controls and dynamics, fluids and thermal sciences, nanomechanics and nanomanufacturing, solids and materials, mechanics and computation, energy systems, and many others.
  • 6/14/2016
    An international team of nano-materials researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University have produced an ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive to electric current. The film, actually a mat of tangled nanofiber, electroplated to form a "self-junctioned copper nano-chicken wire," is also bendable and stretchable, offering potential applications in roll-up touch screen displays, wearable electronics, flexible solar cells and electronic skin.
  • 6/14/2016
    Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering graduate student Yung-Tin Pan has won a Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the University of Illinois Graduate College. Pan is a Dow Chemical Company Fellow in Dr. Hong Yang’s research group. The theme of Pan's research lies in understanding the behaviors of bimetallic nanomaterials in reactive gaseous environments.He studies the dynamic elemental distribution and arrangements to the atomic level with advanced in situ microscopy techniques. Pan received his bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from National Taiwan University.
  • 6/7/2016
    The U.S. Department of Defense released its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative program awards last month, and three faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences are part of the newly funded research efforts. One of the faculty members is Emad Tajkhorshid, professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics, Computational biology, and Pharmacology. Tajkhorshid and his research group are studying the movement of gases across biological membranes, a vital process for powering cells with oxygen and performing photosynthesis, among other things. The group is hoping to closely examine the role of proteins in these processes in order to better understand the impact of gas exchange in living cells and organisms.
  • 6/6/2016
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique for extremely high speed photonic sensing of the mechanical properties of freely flowing particles using an opto-mechano-fluidic resonator (OMFR). This research potentially opens up completely new mechanical “axes of measurement” on micro/nanoparticles and bioparticles.
  • 6/6/2016
    Bioengineering student Aaron Schwartz-Duval of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently participated in the French American Doctoral Exchange program (FADEx) for 2016: Nanoparticles for Medicine. The FADEx program invites both French and American students to participate in a seminar in France along with leading researchers in the field of nanoparticles in medicine. Schwartz-Duval was one of only 10 American students chosen for the award this year. He said he sees it as a wonderful opportunity to gain knowledge and exposure for his research.
  • 5/17/2016
    Scientists have developed thin, soft stretchy batteries and solar cells that can be applied to the skin like a band-aid. The flexible power system overcomes barriers experienced by current wearable technologies, according to a report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Co-author Professor John Rogers, at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, at the University of Illinois, said these barriers included modest electrical performance and the rigid nature of current systems.
  • 5/11/2016
    Researchers at CSL are working to develop a technique that can make integrated circuits operate faster, consume less energy, and maintain a high level of correctness at the system level, even when there are errors at the circuit level. These findings are detailed in the paper, “Perfect Error Compensation via Algorithmic Error Cancellation,” which won the Best Student Paper Award at the 41st IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, in Shanghai, China. Gonugondla works in the SONIC (Systems on Nanoscale Information fabriCs) Center, a multi-university research center led by the University of Illinois that focuses on the design of robust, energy-efficient, and intelligent computing platforms using emerging nanoscale devices.
  • 5/11/2016
    Illinois undergraduates from engineering, business and journalism disciplines will work together on three CubeSat missions following recent awards from the National Aeronautical and Space Administration. CubeSats are known as nanosatellites. Alexander Ghosh, AE Lecturer and Manager of the Advanced Research for the Exploration of Space (ARES) Center, said the various projects will be multi-institutional as well as multidisciplinary. Illinois will partner with Northwestern University on one project, Purdue University on another, and will involve Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, to a smaller degree.
  • 5/10/2016
    MechSE Assistant Professor Gaurav Bahl was recently awarded a Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grant from the U.S. Department of Defense and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Last year, Bahl and his student Yin-Chung Chen proposed theoretically a new method to cool solids using only light, through the Raman scattering mechanism. This DURIP grant helps fund the construction of a fully custom Raman spectrometer, which will allow them to experimentally verify their theoretical predictions.
  • 5/9/2016
    During its annual conference in March, the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) honored ECE Professor Jianming Jin with its highest award, recognizing his career-long contributions to the field of computational electromagnetics.
  • 5/6/2016
    The facility, affectionately called the Fab Lab, is currently in the process of being moved to a new space in MNTL. The Fab Lab is used primarily to teach ECE 444, which gives students a hands-on experience in the process of making semi-conductor devices.
  • 5/5/2016
    Dr. Achilefu, Michel M. Ter-Pogossian Endowed Chair in Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, presented "Making the Invisible Visible. Dr. Razeghi, Walter P. Murphy Professor, and Director, Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, presented "The Wonder of Nanotechnology."
  • 5/5/2016
    Two MatSE graduate students received awards at the 2016 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting in San Francisco. The MRS Graduate Student Awards recognize students of exceptional ability who show promise for future substantial achievement in materials research. The criteria for selection are excellence in the conduct of materials research, promise for future substantial achievement in materials research, and clarity of the presentation and discussion.
  • 5/4/2016
    After 15 years at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center in New York, Yurii Vlasov has accepted a tenured position spanning across three U of I departments: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Bioengineering. Vlasov is one of the pioneers of silicon nanophotonics. He is highly regarded for his work at IBM, developing technology that greatly reduces the energy and cost required to transmit large amounts of data between chips.
  • 5/2/2016
    Gregory Pluta has joined the Micro + Nanotechnology Lab (MNTL) as managing director. Pluta is leading the effort to establish MNTL’s new Industry Affiliates Program, while helping MNTL’s operations function effectively.
  • 4/27/2016
    The net-zero ready facility acts as the new home for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, which has a deep tradition of innovative faculty, hands-on classroom experiences and groundbreaking research that helped shape the modern world with the advent of transistors, integrated circuits, light emitting diodes (LEDs) and plasma displays.
  • 4/27/2016
    CNST, NanoSTRuCT, and RET booth among EOH 2016 Award Winners! In the Interdisciplinary Collaboration category, NanoSTRuCT placed 2nd and CNST placed 3rd. The CNST nano@illinois RET booth placed 3rd in the Most Innovative Exhibit.
  • 4/27/2016
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a one-step, facile method to pattern graphene by using stencil mask and oxygen plasma reactive-ion etching, and subsequent polymer-free direct transfer to flexible substrates. “Significant progress has been made in the direct synthesis of large-area, uniform, high quality graphene films using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with various precursors and catalyst substrates,” explained SungWoo Nam, an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering.
  • 4/15/2016
    Researchers in the lab of Rohit Bhargava, professor of Bioengineering and member of Beckman’s Bioimaging Science and Technology Group, have proposed a new imaging method to determine the risk of lethal prostate cancer upon initial diagnosis. The project, “3D Prostate Histochemometry to Predict Disease Recurrence,” has been awarded $1,606,899 over four years by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health.
  • 4/7/2016
    Physics Illinois PhD student Tyler Earnest won an honorable mention award in the Image of Research contest, put on by the University of Illinois Graduate College and the Scholarly Commons of the University Library. Earnest’s poster, titled, “Building Ribosomes from Computational LEGO,” is based on research he performed under Zaida Luthey-Schulten, the William and Janet Lycan Professor of Chemistry, with an affiliate appointment in the Department of Physics.
  • 4/7/2016
    The bipolar junction transistor and light emitting diode are two innovations that have made a profound impact on the world. Professors John Bardeen and Nick Holonyak Jr., the respective inventors of these technologies, have also made a lasting impact on ECE ILLINOIS, where they spent the majority of their careers. This talk by Prof. Dallesasse reviews the men and their impact - both local and global - and also looks at some of the current work that ties their contributions together.
  • 4/6/2016
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including Assistant Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering SungWoo Nam, have demonstrated a new approach to modifying the light absorption and stretchability of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials by surface topographic engineering using only mechanical strain.
  • 4/4/2016
    On April 4, 2016, a delegation from Katholieke Universiteit (KU) Leuven in Belgium visited the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology for a discussion and presentations on nanotechnology collaborations with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/31/2016
    Kaimin Cai, Ph.D. student, was honored as a 2016 Illinois Technology Foundation "Fifty for the Future" Awardee. Cai’s research focuses on trigger-responsive conjugates for selective delivery of drugs to diseased areas of the body. "I synthesize drug conjugates that can be easily incorporated into nanoparticles and use them for cancer-specific delivery and treatment."
  • 3/15/2016
    Four MechSE assistant professors have received NSF CAREER Awards for 2016 with research interests covering vast nanoscale properties.
  • 3/14/2016
    The bio-bots are powered by muscle cells that have been genetically engineered to respond to light, giving researchers control over the bots’ motion, a key step toward their use in applications for health, sensing and the environment. Led by Rashid Bashir, the University of Illinois head of Bioengineering, the researchers published their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
  • 3/12/2016
    Princess U II Imoukhuede, an assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering, has been awarded a Scientist Development Grant by the American Heart Association. The three-year, $308,000 award will fund her proposal, “Predicting new targets for inducing sprouting angiogenesis via systems biology.”
  • 3/11/2016
    Rashid Bashir, Department Head of Bioengineering, and researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a highly sensitive biosensor based on a differential immuno-capture technology that can detect sub-populations of white blood cells. As part of a small, disposable biochip, the microfluidic biosensor can count CD4+/CD8+ T cells quickly and accurately for AIDS diagnosis in the field.
  • 3/9/2016
    Light and electrons interact in a complex dance within fiber optic devices. A new study by Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Milton Feng and his group found that in the transistor laser, a device for next-generation high-speed computing, the light and electrons spur one another on to faster switching speeds than any devices available.
  • 3/8/2016
    Chemistry students building nanomaterials in Chemistry professor Catherine Murphy’s lab are sharing space at their workbenches this spring with an aspiring architect, an environmental design student and two dancers.
  • 3/7/2016
    The tiny BioBots engineered at UIUC NSF-funded Science and Technology Center (STC) move a bit like inchworms, but they represent giant strides in science and engineering. The following video highlights Department Head of Bioengineering Rashid Bashir and members of his lab group who are working on this project.
  • 2/29/2016
    “The STEM of Innovation” is the theme for the 96th annual Engineering Open House (EOH) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All events and exhibits are free and open to the public. Student projects and start-up exhibits will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 11, and from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 12, on the Engineering Campus, which is north of Green Street.
  • 2/18/2016
    The André Schleife research group is developing a multi-scale approach for the computational design and discovery of optical materials that bridges the simulation gap between several atoms and actual optical materials. This research project recently received funding through an NSF CAREER Award.
  • 2/16/2016
    Ange-Therese Akono, an assistant professor at in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been named one of ten "2016 New Faces of Civil Engineering Professionals" by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). In her research laboratory, she investigates broad societal issues like reducing the carbon footprint of the concrete industry or discovering enhanced-performance structural nano-materials by integrating applied mathematics, advanced solid mechanics and laser-precision experiments.
  • 2/16/2016
    The recent observation of gravitational waves, or ripples in the spacetime fabric, has been heralded as one of the greatest accomplishments of astrophysics in our time – the first step in advancing our understanding of the Big Bang theory, colliding neutron stars, and supermassive black holes. Gonugondla is working with other SONIC researchers to build energy-efficient and reliable computing systems on nanoscale fabrics by exploring techniques that seek to cancel or compensate for circuit noise.
  • 2/10/2016
    MechSE Assistant Professor SungWoo Nam was awarded a grant from the Air Force Young Investigator Research Program. Nam’s research program at the university is focused on multifunctional engineered nanomaterials and devices. His lab is working on nano-engineering graphene and two-dimensional materials-based nanostructures and devices for multifunctionality.
  • 2/8/2016
    The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) announced the winner of the second round of EnvisioNano, a nanotechnology image contest for students. Elizabeth Sawicki, a member of the Medical Scholars Program and the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, won the top honors for her image entitled Gelatin Nanoparticles in Brain.
  • 1/25/2016
    Assistant Professor Can Bayram has been selected as one of the 56 scientists and engineers nationwide to receive an Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Young Investigator Award. This prestigious award program focuses on enhancing the early career development of outstanding scientists who have received their PhD in the last five years.
  • 1/19/2016
    Assistant Professor Sameh Tawfick was recently named a 2016 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer by SME. This award recognizes engineers age 35 or younger for their exceptional contributions and accomplishments in the manufacturing industry.
  • 1/13/2016
    MechSE assistant professor SungWoo Nam has received the prestigious NSF CAREER Award for his research titled Corrugated Graphene Superlattice Structures by Strain-induced Shrink Nanomanufacturing.
  • 1/11/2016
    New findings by Professor Stephen Sligar and colleagues have outlined the structural determinates of a chemical transformation that carries profound implications for the potential design of a mechanism-based inhibitors for the treatment of prostate cancer. The research is published in PNAS.
  • 1/7/2016
    The use of nuclear fusion as an energy-producing alternative may become more feasible with NPRE Associate Prof. J.P. Allain’s work in advancing adaptive and self-healing materials.
  • 1/5/2016
    An interdisciplinary research team at Illinois has developed a new material composite derived from quantum dots. These lipoprotein nanoplatelets are rapidly taken up by cells and retain their fluorescence, making them particularly well-suited for imaging cells and understanding disease mechanisms.
  • 1/4/2016
    Topological insulators, an exciting, relatively new class of materials, are capable of carrying electricity along the edge of the surface, while the bulk of the material acts as an electrical insulator. Practical applications for these materials are still mostly a matter of theory, as scientists probe their microscopic properties to better understand the fundamental physics that govern their peculiar behavior.
  • 12/21/2015
    Seven University of Illinois researchers have been named to the Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers list for 2015. Chemistry professor Cathy Murphy is recognized for her research on the synthesis, shape control, biological applications and environmental implications of gold nanoparticles.
  • 12/20/2015
    Dr. Rashid Bashir and team discuss results in "Technology" December 2015 issue.
  • 12/18/2015
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with AMI Research and Development, LLC (AMI), have developed advanced technology supporting an ultra-high—greater than 65 percent—solar energy conversion system. With the current emphasis on the fast-track development of clean-energy projects to combat global warming, these advancements provide a head start towards marketable solutions.
  • 12/16/2015
    This past semester, Illinois' Bioengineering department piloted a brand new course, BioFabrication Lab, that teaches undergraduate students how to build biobots. Developed as part of the NSF-funded EBICS (Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems) Science and Technology Center, the course distilled down cutting-edge EBICS research and initiated eight Bioengineering juniors and seniors into the mysteries of building with biology.
  • 12/11/2015
    NanoSTRuCT (Nanoscale Science and Technology Resources for Community Teaching) has continued its STEM outreach efforts at Booker T. Washington STEM Academy in fall 2015, with 75 3rd grade students. This project, originally funded through an Illinois Public Engagement grant, relies on graduate student volunteers in STEM fields, and is managed by the CNST. Efforts will continue in Spring 2016.
  • 12/8/2015
    Light and electricity dance a complicated tango in devices like LEDs, solar cells and sensors. A new anti-reflection coating developed in research led by Professor Daniel M. Wasserman, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, lets light through without hampering the flow of electricity, a step that could increase efficiency in such devices.
  • 12/8/2015
    The device, called OcuCheck, works by measuring levels of vitamin C in the fluids that coat or leak from the eye. The sensor could speed efforts to determine the extent of eye injuries at accident sites, in rural areas lacking ophthalmology specialists, or on the battlefield, the researchers said. Dipanjan Pan, assistant professor of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is creating the device in collaboration with Dr. Leanne Labriola, Carle ophthalmologist, Urbana, Ill.
  • 12/7/2015
    In an interdisciplinary collaboration between prominent academic and industry investigators, researchers have discovered a novel method for repositioning an FDA-approved anti-cancer compound so it can specifically target liver cancer tumors. A “triple attack” technique combining chemotherapy, thermal ablation, and hyperthermia provided a highly targeted, yet minimally invasive approach.
  • 12/4/2015
    The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) will recognize Adesida for his contributions to the field of electronic materials. Adesida's expertise is in nanofabrication and semiconductor materials, and he's working to produce high-speed electronic devices that can be used for the technology of daily life. Adesida said that the department allows for its faculty to truly explore their interests in a collaborative setting that is unique to Illinois.
  • 12/1/2015
    In an interdisciplinary collaboration between prominent academic and industry investigators, researchers have discovered a novel method for repositioning an FDA-approved anti-cancer compound so it can specifically target liver cancer tumors. A “triple attack” technique combining chemotherapy, thermal ablation, and hyperthermia provided a highly targeted, yet minimally invasive approach.
  • 12/1/2015
    Research on wearable electronics focuses on its potential in health care. “I think electronics is coming at you,” [Rogers] says. “It's migrating closer and closer and I think it's a very natural thing to imagine that they will eventually become intimately integrated with the body.”
  • 11/23/2015
    CNST faculty affiliates chosen include Dr. Hong Yang, the Richard C. Alkire Professor in Chemical Engineering, and Dr. Ralph Nuzzo, G.L. Clark Professor of Chemistry.
  • 11/17/2015
    Apparently, size doesn’t always matter. An extensive study by an interdisciplinary research group suggests that the deformation properties of nanocrystals are not much different from those of the Earth’s crust.
  • 11/10/2015
    Illinois professor Narayana Aluru led a team that found that tiny pores in thin sheets of the material molybdenum disulfide could be very good at removing salt from seawater to yield drinkable water.
  • 11/9/2015
    Scott R. White, professor of aerospace engineering at Illinois, will lead the $4.3 million University of Illinois Center of Excellence in Self-healing, Regeneration, and Structural Remodeling, which builds upon research into autonomous materials conducted by the Autonomous Materials Systems Group at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.
  • 11/4/2015
    Elham Mohimi, Ph.D. student in MatSE at Illinois, has been selected to receive an Outstanding Graduate Student Award. The award, worth $5,000, was made possible by a generous gift from Lam Research Corporation. The approaches she uses are part of an emerging new paradigm for the fabrication of nanoscale structures and devices. In the future, nanoscale devices will be even smaller and more tightly packed than is the case today.
  • 11/4/2015
    By “crumpling” to increase the surface area of graphene-gold nanostructures, University of Illinois Professor Sungwoo Nam and team have improved the sensitivity of these materials, opening the door to novel opportunities in electronics and optical sensing applications.
  • 11/3/2015
    By studying the behavior of living cells and combining them with synthetic tissue, researchers are creating “biological machines” to deliver drugs more effectively, function as internal diagnostic tools, or serve as contaminant sensors in the field. This work is facilitated by a multi-institution effort known as the Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS), which recently received $25 million in National Science Foundation (NSF) renewal funding for the next five years to build living, multi-cellular machines to solve environmental, health, and security problems.
  • 10/30/2015
    University of Illinois Professor John Rogers and team discuss latest their research on epidermal devices in the latest Science Advances.
  • 10/27/2015
    Vice Chancellor for Research and Physicist Peter Schiffer of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source, and with other researchers nationwide, has realized a nanoscale, artificial magnet by arranging an array of magnetic nano-islands along a geometry that is not found in natural magnets.
  • 10/22/2015
    The idea behind the Illinois Cancer Scholars Program is to offer students a different kind of educational experience in which they learn about a real-world problem and approaches to solving it. The goal is to show the students the relevance of their coursework and to provide clinical and research opportunities for them to apply what they are learning to cancer research.
  • 10/20/2015
    DeStefano helped CNST and MNTL develop strong, innovative education programs.
  • 10/20/2015
    Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology and Principal Investigator Andrew Belmont from the University of Illinois heads a team of Investigators that has been awarded an $8M grant over five years to study nuclear structure from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund as part of the recently-unveiled 4D Nucleome Program.
  • 10/16/2015
    Dr. Cordova's visit highlighted National Science Foundation centers and programs including Center for Innovative Instrumentation Technology (CiiT), Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS), Cellular and Molecular Mechanics and BioNanotechnology-Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (CMMB-IGERT), nanoBIO Node, nano@illinois Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and nano@illinois Research Experiences for Teachers (RET).
  • 10/16/2015
    ECE graduate student Huiming Xu won the 2014 Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Symposium (CSICS) Best Student Paper Award for his research on a novel double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT). Xu’s advisor, Professor Milton Feng, received the award last week at the 2015 CSICS conference.
  • 10/15/2015
    Illinois receives rare honor in recognition of its contributions to microbiology.
  • 10/8/2015
    Johnson's award and sabbatical profiled in article from UI Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering.
  • 10/5/2015
    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have introduced a new class of light-emitting quantum dots (QDs) with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colors. This results in more accurate measurements of molecules in diseased tissue and improved quantitative imaging capabilities.
  • 10/5/2015
    Dr. Smith's work on light-emitting quantum dots is featured.
  • 10/1/2015
    Jonathan Sweedler, professor of chemistry, Martha Gillette, professor of cell and developmental biology, and Rohit Bhargava, professor of bioengineering, head up the project titled “BRAIN Initiative: Integrated Multimodal Analysis of Cell- and Circuit-Specific Activity using Mass Spectrometry Profiling and Correlated Raman Imaging.”
  • 9/21/2015
    "Pathtracker: A smartphone-based system for mobile infectious disease detection and epidemiology," led by Brian Cunningham, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of bioengineering at Illinois, is an NSF-funded project, that will receive $1 million to develop a mobile sensor technology for performing detection and identification of viral and bacterial pathogens.
  • 9/18/2015
    When Lt. Governor Evelyn Sanguinetti visited I-STEM, she met with a number of like-minded Illinois groups, including CNST, regarding increasing the number of underrepresented students in STEM.
  • 9/15/2015
    University of Illinois industrial design professor Deana McDonagh, center, is working with U. of I. materials science and engineering professor John Rogers, left, and Northwestern University mechanical engineering and civil and environmental engineering professor Yonggang Huang, right, on a wearable health-monitoring device that will measure a person’s vital signs and motion.
  • 9/14/2015
    Professor Placid Ferreira, along with PhD student Kyle Jacobs, recently wrote a research paper that was published in Advanced Functional Materials. The paper, titled “Painting and Direct Writing of Silver Nanostructures on Phosphate Glass with Electron Beam Irradiation,” gives an in-depth look into the study of using an electron beam to write patterns on a specific type of conductive substrate. The outcome of their research will benefit other scientists in furthering the development of writing with electron beam irradiation.
  • 8/17/2015
    Twenty-six students, postdocs, and junior faculty from science and engineering disciplines from across the campus, the country, and overseas participated in the 2015 University of Illinois BioNanotechnology Summer Institute from July 27-August 7 at the Micro + Nanotechnology Lab, learning about cancer nanotechnology, cell mechanics, molecular biology, micro & nano fabrication techniques, and microfluidics.
  • 8/17/2015
    Working at the intersection of mechanical engineering, electronics, and materials science, Assistant Professor Arend van der Zande is investigating the properties of 2-dimensional (2D) materials and building novel devices from them. Naturally stable at only one or two atoms thick, 2D materials are a new, exciting class of nanomaterial that are exceptionally strong, lightweight, flexible, and conduct heat and electricity well.
  • 8/12/2015
    In early 2016, the University will renovate Everitt Laboratory, a campus landmark and point of pride for many Engineering students, alumni and faculty. Upon completion of the upcoming renovation, the building will become the new home of the Department of Bioengineering.
  • 8/11/2015
    Dr. Cunningham's article, "Novel Process Cuts Costs and Improves Performance of Quantum Dots," is featured in this issue.
  • 8/7/2015
    Large-area integration of quantum dots and photonic crystals produce brighter & more efficient light.
  • 8/1/2015
    News highlights are featured in the inaugural issue of InstruMNTL, the Micro + Nanotechnology Lab's e-newsletter for MNTL alumni, faculty, students, staff, and friends.
  • 7/28/2015
    This summer 11 undergraduate students and 12 middle school, high school and community college teachers learned first-hand how nanotechnology is helping researchers address some of society’s grand technological challenges.
  • 7/27/2015
    The 2015 two-week program ran from July 27-August 7, 2015 at the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab.
  • 7/13/2015
    Bioengineering Assistant Professor Dipanjan Pan’s project, titled “A Nanotechnology Approach for Efficient Crude Oil Pollution Treatment via Entrapment, Dispersal and Removal using Nano-CarboScavenger,” addresses the water and land stewardship and sustainable infrastructure themes. Its purpose is to optimize a Nano-CarboScavenger (NCS), a particle designed to adsorb oil and remove it from water.
  • 7/9/2015
    Professor Rashid Bashir interviewed for Chicago Tribune article about University of Illinois Jump Simulation Center
  • 6/29/2015
    A $10 million gift will launch the Jump Simulation Center in Urbana and help train a new type of doctor uniquely equipped to transform health care. The center will be part of the new College of Medicine, a partnership of Carle Health System and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the first medical school in the nation focused from the beginning at the intersection of engineering and medicine.
  • 6/23/2015
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new approach for forming 3D shapes from flat, 2D sheets of graphene, paving the way for future integrated systems of graphene-MEMS hybrid devices and flexible electronics.
  • 6/18/2015
    Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body’s immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues.
  • 6/18/2015
    Rogers' Biostamp technology is featured in May 2015 article.
  • 6/9/2015
    Professor Joseph W. Lyding received the Foresight Institute Feynman Prize, a premier honor for his research and development in the field of nanotechnology from the Foresight Institute, a think tank and public interest organization that focuses on molecular nanotechnology.
  • 6/8/2015
    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have uncovered physical mechanisms allowing the manipulation of magnetic information with heat. These new phenomena rely on the transport of thermal energy, in contrast to the conventional application of magnetic fields, providing a new, and highly desirable way to manipulate magnetization at the nanoscale.
  • 5/28/2015
    A team of researchers from the University of Illinois has received a grant from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust to build a first-of-its-kind opto-mechanical microscope. The device will be capable of obtaining optical, mechanical, and even chemical information from a biological specimen.
  • 5/16/2015
    The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology will participate again in Science at the Market from May through September 2015.
  • 4/28/2015
    Six University of Illinois professors have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest professional honors a scientist can garner.
  • 4/22/2015
    Today the Technology Entrepreneur Center announces the three finalists for the Illinois Innovation Prize, which awards $20,000 to students who stand out as a passionate innovator and entrepreneur, who are working with world changing technology and are seen as a role model for others.
  • 4/20/2015
    The CNST Nanotechnology Workshop highlights University of Illinois research in bionanotechnology and nanomedicine, nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, and nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing, leading to cross-campus and industry collaborations. Featured speakers include Dr. Mostafa A. El-Sayed and Dr. Mehmet Toner.
  • 4/20/2015
    A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by University of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology.
  • 4/17/2015
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign today announced a $12 million commitment from alumnus Sidney Lu to build the Sidney Lu Center for Learning and Innovation within the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering (MechSE).
  • 4/16/2015
    A group of graduate students from MNTL were honored April 15 by the U of I Office of Volunteer Programs (OVP) for their engineering outreach efforts.
  • 4/7/2015
    The exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes have tantalized researchers for years because of the possibility they could be used to make smaller, faster and cheaper electronic devices. A big barrier to building useful electronics with carbon nanotubes has always been the fact that when they're arrayed into films, a certain portion of them will act more like metals than semiconductors – an unforgiving flaw that fouls the film. Now Illinois professor John Rogers and a team of researchers have shown how to strip out the metallic carbon nanotubes from arrays using a relatively simple, scalable procedure that does not require expensive equipment.
  • 4/1/2015
    Characterizing the mechanical properties of materials using indentation has been around for centuries. It has recently emerged as the technique of choice for evaluating and characterizing hard and soft tissue. Recent work on mechanotransduction - the transduction of biological signals through mechanical signals also provides fertile ground for work in this area. It has also been used in understanding the different cell functions and in assessing the soundness of various nanoBIO devices. At this conference, organized by the nanoBIO Node at Illinois, leading experts and scientists discussed the current and future trends in nanoindentation and its application in mechanotransduction and the mechanical characterization of soft materials.
  • 3/18/2015
    Two Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology-affiliated booths received awards at 2015 Engineering Open House. In the category of “The Future Starts Here," the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Student Initiative (CNST-SI) received 2nd place. In the category of “Most Innovative Exhibit," nano@Illinois Research Experience for Teachers (RET) earned 2nd place.
  • 3/16/2015
    Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated the first-ever recording of optically encoded audio onto a non-magnetic plasmonic nanostructure, opening the door to multiple uses in informational processing and archival storage.
  • 3/12/2015
    Partners in a first-of-its-kind medical college on the University of Illinois’s Urbana-Champaign campus are advancing to the next phase of development. The University of Illinois Board of Trustees have voted unanimously to establish the nation’s first college of medicine focused, from the beginning, on the intersection of engineering and medicine. This will be the first new college created at Urbana in 60 years. The college will be a partnership between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carle Health System that is specifically designed to train a new kind of doctor. This ground-breaking approach will integrate the university’s unparalleled assets in engineering, technology and supercomputing with Carle’s nationally recognized, comprehensive health care system.
  • 3/4/2015
    Engineering Open House 2015: "The Future Starts Here" will be held at the University of Illinois on March 13-14, 2015. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology will have 3 booths at the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab on March 13.
  • 2/16/2015
    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a unique single-step process to achieve three-dimensional (3D) texturing of graphene and graphite. Using a commercially available thermally activated shape-memory polymer substrate, this 3D texturing, or “crumpling,” allows for increased surface area and opens the doors to expanded capabilities for electronics and biomaterials.
  • 2/12/2015
    Brian Cunningham, who has been serving as MNTL interim director since August 2013, has been chosen as the Lab's director effective February 16, 2015. "An ECE alumnus, Brian’s deep understanding of nanoscience and nanotechnology and his enthusiasm about the groundbreaking innovations that will be made possible because of them, point to a very bright future for MNTL under his leadership," said College of Engineering Dean Andreas Cangellaris in a statement. "His highly-visible scholarship, his successful translation of nanophotonics innovations to technologies and devices for biosensing applications, and his multi-faceted experience in leading interdisciplinary teams on successful center activities, have made him an excellent choice for the job."
  • 2/10/2015
    Physicists Alexey Bezryadin, Alfred Hubler, and Andrey Belkin have demonstrated the emergence of self-organized structures that drive the evolution of a non-equilibrium system to a state of maximum entropy production.
  • 2/10/2015
    MNTL faculty researcher Andrew Smith wants to better understand the fundamentals of cancer biology, and to develop a new generation of diagnostic and prognostic tools for doctors who treat the disease. His tool of choice? Quantum dots, which are engineered nanoscale semiconductor particles that produce fluorescent light when attached to molecules and diseased cells.
  • 2/9/2015
    Electrical and computer engineering faculty with a focus on nanotechnology are profiled.
  • 2/9/2015
    University of Illinois physicists Alexey Bezryadin, Alfred Hubler, and Andrey Belkin have demonstrated the emergence of self-organized structures that drive the evolution of a non-equilibrium system to a state of maximum entropy production.
  • 2/9/2015
    On February 17-18, 2015, the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology will host nanotechnology experts and professionals for a conference that involves the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the University of Illinois, among other institutions.
  • 1/30/2015
    Dipanjan Pan, assistant professor in Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, recently contributed to the body of knowledge in nanomedicine by editing and writing chapters for the book, “Nanomedicine, a Soft Matter Perspective,” published by CRC Press. The book provides a broad introduction to nanomedicine with an emphasis on imaging and therapeutics.
  • 1/13/2015
    New article recently published through Beckman Institute on Professor J. P. Leburton.
  • 1/9/2015
    In the cover feature article of the journal, Science, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign describe a unique process for geometrically transforming two dimensional (2D) micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by exploiting mechanics principles similar to those found in children’s ‘pop-up’ books.
  • 1/6/2015
    Professor Emeritus Nick Holonyak and two of his former students are among the five pioneers of LED technology honored with the 2015 Draper Prize, one of the most prestigious awards in engineering.
  • 1/1/2015
    2014 was another year of doing the impossible at Engineering at Illinois. Our faculty, staff, and students continue to answer the world's toughest questions. They continue to innovate, collaborate, and make our world a better place. Their work drives our optimism for the future.
  • 12/23/2014
    Illinois professor Kyekyoon “Kevin” Kim, graduate student Elizabeth Joachim and research scientist Hyungsoo Choi developed tiny gelatin nanoparticles that can carry medication to the brain, which could lead to longer treatment windows for stroke patients.
  • 12/18/2014
    Attendees participate in two weeks of lectures and hands-on training in engineering and physical science laboratory techniques by experts in the field. Topics include cancer nanotechnology, cell mechanics, molecular biology, micro fabrication, and NanoBio devices. Apply now!
  • 11/26/2014
    Coordinated Science Lab Professor Leslie Allen recently received a $345,000, three-year NSF Solid State Materials Chemistry grant titled “Two-Dimensional Materials: Synthesis and Thermodynamic Nanocalorimetry Measurements.” Allen, an associate professor of materials science and engineering, will be synthesizing and investigating the thermodynamic and electrical properties of ultra-thin crystals of two-dimensional materials.
  • 10/15/2014
    In a recent study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Associate Professor J. J. Cheng and his collaborators systematically evaluated the size-dependent biological profiles of three monodisperse drug-silica nanoconjugates at 20, 50 and 200 nm.
  • 10/10/2014
    MechSE associate professor Kimani C. Toussaint, Jr. has been awarded an appointment as a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Associate Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the 2014-2015 academic year, as part of his sabbatical.
  • 10/1/2014
    A recent study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale, and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
  • 9/12/2014
    For another year, the U of I is bringing "Science at the Market" on selected Saturday mornings to the Farmers Market at Lincoln Square mall in Urbana. U of I and other experts will be on hand with demonstrations illustrating the science they represent, and to answer questions from the public about the researchers' discipline.
  • 9/4/2014
    The new Elecrical and Computer Engineering Building includes a first-of-its-kind undergraduate nanofabrication lab to give students hands-on experience with micro- and nanoelectronics.
  • 9/3/2014
    During Summer 2014, University of Illinois student Arzeena Ali participated in the nano@Illinois Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, where she worked for Dr. Yi Lu, on a nanomaterials-focused project.
  • 9/2/2014
    National and international leaders in the field of bioengineering gathered at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign this month for the Frontiers in Bioengineering Symposium.
  • 8/26/2014
    By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a-chip applications.
  • 7/23/2014
    ECE Assistant Professor Matthew Gilbert received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. The award will fund Gilbert's research into topological nanosystems. Gilbert aims to determine the potential of topological materials to make information processing systems. One of Gilbert's goals is to create models that will be useful for researchers who wish to design experiments and circuits with topological materials.
  • 7/17/2014
    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas (pBNAs) can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light.
  • 7/17/2014
    This summer four area high-school teachers are participating in the nano@illinois Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program, a new program managed by the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology. The six-week program allows the teachers to conduct nanotechnology research in cleanrooms and bionanotechnology laboratories at the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory.
  • 7/14/2014
    An interdisciplinary research team at the University of Illinois has developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems whereby plasmonic field enhancement can actuate mechanical motion.
  • 7/10/2014
    Biology teacher Aubrey Wachtel from Villa Grove High School participated in the NSF-funded nano@illinois Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program during the summer of 2014, where she is helping to conduct cutting-edge research in nanotechnology, and hopes to adapt some of what she is experiencing for her students back at Villa Grove High.
  • 7/10/2014
    A recent study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale, and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
  • 7/9/2014
    For the next three years, STEM teachers will have an opportunity to participate in the nano@illinois Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program, where they will not only learn about, but actually participate in, cutting-edge research in nanotechnology and even adapt some of what they have learned for students in their classrooms.
  • 7/4/2014
    Research in the Cahill group provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
  • 7/1/2014
    Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Shrinky Dinks, plastic that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array to make them useful for high-performance electronics applications. The group published its technique in the journal Nano Letters.
  • 3/24/2014
    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have achieved new levels of performance for seed-free and substrate-free arrays of nanowires from class of materials called III-V (three-five) directly on graphene. These compound semiconductors hold particular promise for applications involving light, such as solar cells or lasers. - See more at: http://engineering.illinois.edu/news/article/7801#sthash.0XaogWpd.dpuf
  • Engineering Open House award winners: EBICS and NanoSTRuCT
    3/18/2014
    CNST-affiliated Engineering Open House projects were award winners at Engineering Open House held March 14, 2014 at the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) received 2nd place in the "Transform Your World" category. The Nanoscale Science and Technology Resources for Community Teaching (NanoSTRuCT) project, led by the CNST Student Initiative, received 3rd place in the same category.
  • 2/26/2014
    The Digital Lab for Manufacturing is an applied research institute that will develop digital manufacturing technologies and commercialize these technologies with key industries. These technologies will be used to make everything from consumer products to heavy machinery to equipment for the military.
  • 1/13/2014
    “Plasmonic nanostructures are of great current interest as chemical sensors, in vivo imaging agents, and for photothermal therapeutics,” explained David G. Cahill, a CNST faculty affiliate.
  • 1/3/2014
    John Rogers, CNST-affiliated faculty member, developed a circuit that dissolves when exposed to water. The animation of this process made Smithsonian Magazine's list of "Coolest Science in 2013, in GIFs."
  • 12/16/2013
    Researchers have long thought that biological molecules and synthetic nanocrystals were similar only in size. Now, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign chemists have found that they can add reactivity to the list of shared traits. Atoms in a nanocrystal can cooperate with each other to facilitate binding or switching, a phenomenon widely found in biological molecules.
  • 12/16/2013
    This award is given on a yearly basis "to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society."
  • 12/2/2013
    Professor Brian Cunningham has received NIH funding for the development of biosensors for early-stage cancer detection.
  • 11/25/2013
    Electrical and computer engineering professor Joseph Lyding led the research team that developed a way to heal gaps in wires too small for even the world's tiniest soldering iron.
  • 11/25/2013
    Stephen Boppart, Kanti Jain, and William P. King have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • 11/20/2013
    John Rogers, a CNST-affiliated professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been given a 2013 American Ingenuity Award by Smithsonian Magazine, the publishing arm of the Smithsonian Institution.
  • 11/19/2013
    John Rogers was featured in the November 25, 2013 issue of the The New Yorker.
  • 11/18/2013
    King was granted the Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for outstanding achievement in mechanical engineering 10 to 20 years after graduation.
  • 11/12/2013
    Professor Joseph Lyding was honored with the Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology, given by the Bio/Nano Interface Center at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • 11/1/2013
    Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology receives an Illinois Public Engagement Grant for "NanoSTRuCT: Nanoscale Science and Technology Resources for Community Teaching" for 2014.
  • 10/24/2013
    Based on sophisticated computational modeling, Professor Jean-Pierre Leburton and his collaborators believe the use of semiconductor nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize health care by providing DNA sequencing on an unprecedented scale.
  • 10/23/2013
    A $300,000 grant from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust has made possible the purchase of a high-sensitivity live animal imaging system for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The new system will primarily be used by campus researchers in the area of nanomedicine.
  • 10/22/2013
    Professor Hong Yang from the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at the University of Illinois, and Professor Yadong Yin of the University of California Riverside, are the guest editors for the October 2013 special issue of ChemSusChem. The theme for this issue is on "Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage" and covers articles about the shape control of nanostructures and their use.
  • 9/27/2013
    A team from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University has devised a novel nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that delivers a roughly 10­nanometer spatial resolution. This represents a significant advance in MRI sensitivity—modern MRI techniques commonly used in medical imaging yield spatial resolutions on the millimeter length scale, with the highest-resolution experimental instruments giving spatial resolution of a few micrometers.
  • 9/23/2013
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers, led by CNST-affliated faculty Daniel Wasserman, have developed arrays of tiny nano-antennas that can enable sensing of molecules that resonate in the infrared (IR) spectrum.
  • 9/18/2013
    The ability to fabricate nanostructures out of polymers, DNA, proteins and other soft materials has the potential to enable new classes of electronics, diagnostic devices and chemical sensors. In the September issue of Nature Nanotechnology, John Rogers and colleagues report their findings on fabricating nanostructures by combining jet printing with self-assembling block copolymers.
  • 6/25/2013

    Rashid Bashir, current director of the MNTL and Abel Bliss Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Bioengineering, has agreed to become the next head of the Department of Bioengineering, effective August 2013.

  • 6/20/2013

    Andreas C. Cangellaris, the head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next dean of the College of Engineering.

  • 6/20/2013

    Microbattery no larger than a grain of sand, half the width of a human hair.

    3-D printed lithium-ion microbatteries developed by researchers at Harvard and Illinois could supply electricity to tiny devices in fields from medicine to communications, including many that have lingered on lab benches for lack of a battery small enough to fit the device, yet providing enough stored energy to power it. To make the microbatteries, a team printed precisely interlaced stacks of tiny battery electrodes, each less than the diameter of a human hair. The results of the research were published June 18 in the online journal Advanced Materials.

  • 6/11/2013

    University of Illinois researcher Xiuling Li, associate professor in electrical and computer engineering, along with Kyoung Jin Choi, associate professor at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea, have led a team that successfully demonstrated uniform wafer-scale III-V nanowire growth on silicon. The research team developed a novel method to epitaxially grow structurally and compositionally homogeneous and spatially and spectrally uniform ternary nanowires on silicon at wafer-scale using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Previously, a common method for creating nanowires was using Au-assisted Vapor-Liquid-Solid synthesis, but that can cause significant degradation of the quality of the semiconductor nanowires. The team expects their effort to help further research in renewable energy, as it could lead to "high-efficiency and low-cost large-scale solar cells," according to Prof. Choi. This research was published in ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/nn4014774.

  • 6/7/2013

    By confining various liquids inside a hollow microfluidic optomechanical resonator, researchers at Illinois built the first-ever bridge between optomechanics and microfluidics. The team is led by Gaurav Bahl, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering. The team's work, which was published in Nature Communications, has the potential to enable strongly localized, high-sensitivity, optomechanical interaction with chemical and biological samples.

  • 6/5/2013
    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new flow-based method for manipulating and confining single particles in free solution, a process that will help address current challenges faced by nanoscientists and engineers.
  • 5/30/2013

    Using arrays of tiny lenses and miniaturized detectors, researchers at Illinois, led by John Rogers, have created a tiny bug's eye-inspired camera.

  • 4/25/2013

    The propensity to catch fire is one of the biggest drawbacks to the lithium-ion battery, but University of Illinois researchers believe they have developed a method to keep those pesky fires from destroying a perfectly good battery by adding a thin coating of nanospheres that smother the fire.

  • 4/18/2013

    Two Illinois professors, Yuanhui Zhang and Lance Schideman, have developed a way to create a new biofuel from swine manure. The two are professors in Agricultural and Biological Engineering, and Zhang also is affiliated with the Department of Bioengineering.  The process they've developed not only results in a form of crude oil, it also uses biomass to clean the resulting wastewater. A possible application of the technology could include mixing the team's biofuel with existing fuel. News of the biofuel development recently appeared in domesticfuel.com.

  • 4/18/2013

    CELLular Diagnostics earned a Third Place award in the recent Cozad Competition, a contest that encourages new sustainable businesses. The company is comprised of a team of students led by Kenny Long, doctoral student in Bioengineering. CELLular Diagnostics plans to make smartphone-based biosensors for disease diagnostics in sub-Sahara Africa.

  • 4/18/2013

    A new form of microbattery developed at Illinois drastically reduces limitations previously inherent in microelectronics -- trading high power for low energy or vice versa. The revolutionary 3-D design of the Illinois team's battery allows for high performance in both power and energy. Results of the research were published in Nature Communications April 16. The Illinois team is led by Prof. William King includes student James Pikul, both in Mechanical Science and Engineering.

  • 4/10/2013

    The R. W. Wood Prize is given for an outstanding discovery, scientific or technological achievement or invention. Milton Feng has received this recognition for contributions to the invention and realization of the transistor laser, delivering simultaneously both an electrical signal and a coherent laser output and providing the basis for a revolutionary new higher speed electronic-photonic integrated circuit. Established by OSA in 1975 to honor the many contributions that R.W. Wood made to optics, this award recognizes an outstanding discovery, scientific or technical achievement, or invention in the field of optics. The accomplishment for which the prize is given is measured chiefly by its impact on the field of optics generally, and therefore the contribution is one that opens a new era of research or significantly expands an established one. It is endowed by the Xerox Corporation.

  • 4/10/2013
  • 3/15/2013

    Collaborators from the Mayo Illinois Alliance for Technology Based Healthcare have developed a new, single molecule assay for detecting methylated DNA -- a naturally occurring process that controls gene expression. The assay involves using a synthetic solid-state nano pore, and researchers say it has great potential in speeding disease-specific analyses of genetic samples. The findings appear in the current issue of Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group).

  • 3/8/2013
    Researchers at the University Illinois report that they have measured the chemical properties of polymer nanostructures as small as 15 nm, using a novel technique called atomic force microscope infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR).
  • 2/26/2013

    A team of scientists from the University of Illinois and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have advanced the sensitivity of nanoscale sensors that can be used used to analyze chemicals, DNA and proteins. And an ancient artifact is their inspiration. The chemical makeup of the Lycurgus Cup -- a 4th century artifact on exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago through mid-August -- allows it to appear to be a different color when light is shone through it. Similar properties are reflected in the team's sensor research. The results and future related advances have implications for making diagnostics quicker and simpler by putting them in handheld electronics such as smartphones.

    This groundbreaking advancement is the cover story of the January 2013 issue of Advanced Optical Materials and is featured in WIRED magazine.

  • 2/14/2013

    MNTL Director Rashid Bashir and his research team have advanced the technology of integrating laboratory functions -- creation of a "lab on a chip" -- by addressing heat, evaporation and luminescence issues.

  • 2/14/2013

    A substantial new five-year grant from the National Science Foundation enables stronger nano- and biotechnology infrastructure and helps strengthen 'the bridge between engineering and biology.' Bioengineering Asst. Prof. Ting Lu is a co-Principal Investigator.

  • 1/31/2013

    The Coblentz Society, a professional organization focused on fostering "the understanding and application of infrared spectroscopy," has awarded Bioengineering Prof. Rohit Bhargava the 2013 Craver Award. Since 2007, the award has been presented annually to recognize the work of scientists who "have made significant contributions in applied analytical vibrational spectroscopy." Bhargava will receive the award and deliver the Craver Award Plenary Lecture in Applied Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Society's annual conference in Milwaukee in Fall 2013.

  • 1/28/2013

    A $100 million gift has been pledged to the College of Engineering. The Grainger Engineering Breakthroughs Initiative will focus on bioengineering and big data. It will help attract the best students and faculty and includes support for scholarship, research and facilities.

  • 1/28/2013

    Leading the new SONIC Center is Director Naresh Shanbhag, the Jack S. Kilby Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Illinois. As part of the Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research network (STARNet), the center will focus on developing reliable systems to aid in creating more efficient electronic devices. 

  • 1/15/2013

    DNA sequencing technology developed at the University of Illinois has helped forge a new licensing and funding agreement to support further research. The arrangement with Oxford Nanopore Technology includes three British and four American universities, including Illinois. The researchers from Illinois who will serve as co-Principal Investigators for the project are: Micro and Nanotechnology Director Rashid Bashir; Jean-Pierre Leburton, professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Beckman Institute; and Oleksii Aksimentiev, associate professor of Physics and the Beckman Institute.

  • 1/8/2013
    A British company, Oxford Nanopore Technologies, Ltd. (ONT), has announced agreements with four American and two British universities to license DNA sensing technology and to fund future research. Beckman Institute researchers Jean-Pierre Leburton, Aleksei Aksimentiev, and Rashid Bashir, are leading the effort at the University of Illinois.
  • 1/7/2013

    Carl R. Woese, the internationally known University of Illinois scientist who is credited with discovering and identifying a third domain of life, died Dec. 30 in Urbana, IL. Woese was a microbiologist, evolutionist, biophysicist, and the Stanley O. Ikenberry Professor of Microbiology at Illinois. He also was affiliated with the Institute for Genomic Biology at Illinois. Among the many awards he received are the National Medal of Science in 2000 and the Crafoord Prize in Biosciences in 2003.

  • 12/6/2012

    Two Engineering at Illinois faculty members--Thomas Huang, electrical and computer engineering and John Rogers, materials science and engineering--are among the five University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty to be named Swanlund Chairs, the highest endowed titles on the Urbana campus.

  • 11/29/2012

    Northwestern University has joined forces with four Midwestern universities and a national laboratory to establish the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology, which this fall received funding from the National Science Foundation.

  • 11/29/2012

    New insights into a protein complex that regulates the very tips of chromosomes could improve methods of screening anti-cancer drugs.

  • 11/26/2012

    Researchers from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have demonstrated tiny spheres that synchronize their movements as they self-assemble into a spinning microtube.

  • 11/26/2012

    Surgeons can use imaging for localizing lymph nodes prior to surgery, and for assessing tissue after surgery. Now, a new technology in the form of a handheld optical imaging surgical probe, will give doctors performing procedures on cancer patients the ability to image tissue in situ – meaning that, for the first time, they can image and assess tissue in the patient’s tumor cavity during surgery.

  • 11/17/2012

    Professor Rashid Bashir's research on "bio-bots" is making tracks in biology and across several news media.

  • 11/15/2012

    They’re soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long – and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are making tracks in synthetic biology.

  • 11/14/2012

    One of the most promising innovations of nanotechnology has been the ability to perform rapid nanofabrication using nanometer-scale tips. The fabrication speed can be dramatically increased by using heat. 

  • 11/12/2012

    ECE Professor Brian T. Cunningham and his colleagues have long been engaged in researching new technologies in biomarker detection and developing applications for this in modern medicine practices.

  • 11/7/2012

    Researchers were able to study the critical process of cell transport dynamics at multiple spatial and temporal scales and reveal, for the first time, properties of diffusive and directed motion transport in living cells.

  • 11/6/2012

    On Wednesday afternoons, a number of Bioengineering undergrads can be found at Champaign's Jefferson Middle School teaching seventh and eighth graders about science.

  • 11/1/2012

    The new SONIC center — short for Systems on Nanoscale Information fabriCs — will be directed by Naresh Shanbhag, a UI professor of electrical and computer engineering.

  • 11/1/2012

    Joseph W. Lyding, a professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE), has been recognized as a trailblazer in the field of nanotechnology, with the 2012 IEEE Pioneer in Nanotechnology Award for his work that has touched many fields along the nanoscale.

  • 10/30/2012

    Champaign-based IntelliWheels has developed a product to make getting around in wheelchairs easier.

  • 10/29/2012

    On October 24, more than 250 participants gathered for the start of the two-day LED 50th Anniversary Symposium that commemorated the demonstration of the visible light-emitting diode (LED) in 1962 by its inventor, ECE alumnus and Professor Nick Holonyak Jr. (BSEE ’50, MSEE ’51, PhD ’54).

  • 10/25/2012

    Scientists from around the world gathered at the I Hotel to pay tribute to Nick Holonyak and his invention of the visible light-emitting diode, or LED, in 1962.

  • 10/25/2012

    First-year engineering students who are passionate about becoming entrepreneurs, innovative product designers, and technical developers are especially encouraged to apply for the College of Engineering's first certificate program--the iFoundry Innovation Certificate (IC).

  • 10/24/2012

    Reebok-CCM Hockey and MC10 Inc. today announced that early next year a revolutionary new wearable sports impact indicator that identifies impacts to the head during play, will be made commercially available to consumers.

  • 10/23/2012

    You may not know his invention, but you use it every day. From the iPhone and iPad, to laptops, flat-screen TVs, traffic lights and alarm clocks, this invention has been prevalent in modern life: the light-emitting diodes, better know as LED.

  • 10/22/2012

    John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder Chair in Engineering at the University of Illinois, has been named director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory (MRL).

  • 10/21/2012

    A company seeking to commercialize "self-healing" technology for paints and coatings has graduated from the University of Illinois business incubator and moved to a site southwest of Champaign.

  • 10/18/2012

    Gallium, phosphorus and arsenic don’t go together. At least that’s the story you would have gotten from most materials and chemistry authorities in the early 1960’s. But not the one you’d have received from Nick Holonyak Jr.

  • 10/16/2012

    Rashid Bashir, an Abel Bliss Professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) and of bioengineering (BioE), has been recognized with the 2012 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) Technical Achievement Award, “for significant contributions to the development of micro and nanoscale biosensors.”

  • 10/16/2012

    Rather than lazing the summer away like some of his peers, Ryan Tapping, an Illinois undergraduate student, spent his productively—making a significant contribution to research. The experiment? Studying how neuron cells from a rat brain form clusters.

  • 10/16/2012

    MC10 wins Wall Street Journal Innovation Award.

  • 10/11/2012

    A new book, The Bright Stuff: The LED and Nick Holonyak’s fantastic trail of innovation, explores the amazing career of the College of Engineering’s most famous faculty member.

  • 10/11/2012

    One of the key achievements of the nanotechnology era is the development of manufacturing technologies that can fabricate nanostructures formed from multiple materials. Such nanometer-scale integration of composite materials has enabled innovations in electronic devices, solar cells, and medical diagnostics.

  • 10/10/2012

    The inventor of the first practical light-emitting diode, or LED, Nick Holonyak Jr., addressed a crowd of students and faculty Tuesday on the 50th anniversary of that innovation. The 83-year old Holonyak took questions in front of more than 100 people at the U of I Illini Union south lounge Tuesday. 

  • 10/10/2012

    Fifty years after demonstrating the first visible light-emitting diode, or LED, Nick Holonyak Jr. received a standing ovation from friends, colleagues and aspiring researchers at an event Tuesday celebrating his achievements.

  • 10/9/2012

    Whether it’s the lighting in a classroom, the brake lights on a car or the backlighting on your television, you’ve probably been exposed to the invention of alumnus and longtime professor Nick Holonyak: LED lighting.

  • 10/9/2012

    Nick Holonyak was sure the LED would replace the incandescent light bulb when he presented it to GE executives 50 years ago. While the incandescent is still king in homes across the nation, the LED has transformed lighting in more ways than Holonyak could have imagined.

  • 10/8/2012

    Nick Holonyak Jr. does not shy away from a challenge, especially in science.

  • 9/29/2012

    University of Illinois researchers have a new low-cost method to carve delicate features onto semiconductor wafers using light – and watch as it happens.

  • 9/28/2012

    Michael Sheetz of Columbia University and Co-PI of the University of Illinois IGERT: Training the Next Generation of Researchers in Cellular and Molecular Mechanics and Bionanotechnology was named co-winner of this year’s Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries related to cytoskeletal motor proteins, agents that move cargo within cells, contract muscles, and enable cell movements.

  • 9/28/2012

    Fifty Years Ago, GE Engineer and evenutual University of Illinois Professor and John Bardeen Endowed Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, Nick Holonyak, turned on the world’s first practical LED. This fall, the University of Illinois will celebrate that important milestone.

  • 9/27/2012

    Researchers at the University of Illinois, in collaboration with Tufts University and Northwestern University, have demonstrated a new type of biodegradable electronics technology that could introduce new design paradigms for medical implants, environmental monitors and consumer devices.

  • 9/24/2012

    ECE Graduate students Fan Lam, Chaitanya Sathe, and Josh Wood, have been selected for the Beckman Institute Graduate Fellows Program. They are among only ten graduate students who were selected for the fellowships. They will begin working with their designated faculty in fall 2012.

  • 9/19/2012

    Illinois' Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) works to provide training and to foster collaboration in nanotechnology at the intersection of engineering and biology.

  • 9/18/2012

    Using ultra-low input power densities, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated for the first time how low-power “optical nanotweezers” can be used to trap, manipulate, and probe nanoparticles, including fragile biological samples.

  • 9/13/2012

    Two Engineering at Illinois faculty members—Sua Myong and John A. Rogers—are among 81 researchers receiving awards to pursue visionary science that exhibits the potential to transform scientific fields and speed the translation of research into improved health, under the High Risk High Reward program supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund.

  • 9/7/2012

    University of Illinois professor Paul Braun weighs in on the amount of time it takes to recharge lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles.

  • 9/3/2012

    Many robotic designs take nature as their muse: sticking to walls like geckos, swimming through water like tuna, sprinting across terrain like cheetahs. Such designs borrow properties from nature, using engineered materials and hardware to mimic animals’ behavior. Dr. Rashid Bashir indicates there will be multiple applications in robotics, medical devices, navigation and locomotion.

  • 8/31/2012

    Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ECE and BioE professor was awarded the 2012 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS) Technical Achievement Award for Significant Contributions to the Development of Micro and Nanoscale Biosensors.

  • 8/30/2012

    The rhythm of life is driven by the cycles of day and night, and most organisms carry in their cells a common, (roughly) 24-hour beat. In animals, this rhythm emerges from a tiny brain structure called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus.

  • 8/29/2012

    The two-week-long BioSensing BioActuation BioNanotechnology Summer Institute 2012, held at the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (MNTL) from July 30–August 10, 2012, trained participants at the intersection of biology and engineering and fostered networking with other researchers.

  • 8/28/2012

    John Rogers, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has found a way to apply his revolutionary flexible sensor technology to sutures and enable them to both precisely measure temperature in real-time.

  • 8/27/2012

    Steve Granick, a Founder Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE), has been recognized as the 2013 recipient of the Colloid and Surface Chemistry Award of the American Chemical Society, the highest honor in colloid science in the United States.

  • 8/21/2012

    Working with units of material so small that it would take 50,000 to make up one drop, scientists are developing the profiles of the contents of individual brain cells in a search for the root causes of chronic pain, memory loss and other maladies that affect millions of people.

  • 8/17/2012

    Nanoribbons obtained from graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) could make ideal interconnects for nanoelectronic circuits.

  • 8/9/2012

    Imagine feeling like you’re lifting a 50-kilogram weight just by pulling at thin air. That’s just one of the possible applications of new "smart fingertips" created by a team of nanoengineers.

  • 8/8/2012

    DNA holds the genetic code for all sorts of biological molecules and traits. But University of Illinois researchers have found that DNA’s code can similarly shape metallic structures.

  • 8/1/2012

    Prasanta Kalita and Mary-Grace Danao, faculty members in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE), have been recognized for excellence in teaching at the 58th Annual Conference of North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA).

  • 7/26/2012

    A collaborative investigation between the University of Illinois and Purdue University has shed new light on the fundamental physics that govern the pattern formation observed in the superconducting phase.

  • 7/25/2012

    ECE Professor James J. Coleman has been named a Fellow of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE). He was one of 75 Fellows elected to the society this year.

  • 7/18/2012

    ECE Assistant Professor Lynford L. Goddard is the recipient of the 2012 Ronald W. Pratt Faculty Outstanding Teaching Award.

  • 7/11/2012

    Logan Liu, assistant professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, is receiving a one-year fellowship to engage in a a collaborative project with researchers and computer technology experts at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. Liu will work with NCSA's Jong Lee to develop handheld water sensors that use mobile smartphones signal acquisition, processing, and transmission ability.

  • 7/10/2012

    Kenneth Suslick, discusses the practical applications of artificial versions of the two chemical human senses, taste and smell.

  • 7/6/2012

    Joseph Lyding, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois, led a group that developed a new microscope probe-sharpening technique.

  • 7/3/2012

    The Office of the Provost announced Professor Michael Bragg will become the new Interim Dean of the College of Engineering effective August 16, 2012.

  • 7/2/2012

    University of Illinois professor Ning Wang and colleagues in China are using soft gels to culture the elusive cells that spread cancer from the primary tumor to other places in the body.

  • 6/21/2012

    The wide scope of projects Nancy Sottos and her graduate students pursue in developing self-healing materials that mimic biological processes are now featured on the American Chemical Society’s Bytesize Science website.

  • 6/14/2012

    Experienced anglers know that choppy waters make for difficult fishing, so they try not to rock the boat. Thanks to a new microscopy technique, cell biology researchers can heed that same advice.

  • 6/14/2012

    University of Illinois IGERT Trainees Aadeel Akhtar and Jonathan Yen were winners of a $2,000 professional development Judges’ Choice award at the 2012 National Science Foundation Video and Poster Competition.

  • 5/30/2012

    Doctors can now get a peek behind the eardrum to better diagnose and treat chronic ear infections, thanks to a new medical imaging device invented by University of Illinois researchers.

  • 5/23/2012

    Wei Yang, the president of Zhejiang University, one of China’s leading research universities, will deliver the second installment of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s “The Research University in the World of the Future” speaker series.

  • 5/14/2012

    Stephen A. Boppart, a Bliss Professor of Engineering with appointments in the departments of electrical and computer engineering, of bioengineering, and of internal medicine at Illinois, has been awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize.

  • 5/11/2012

    UC Bioengineering Professor Todd Coleman, in collaboration with Materials Science and Engineering Professor John A. Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, titled “Epidermal Electronics for Continuous Pregnancy Monitoring.”

  • 5/10/2012

    Yi Lu of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and coworkers, in collaboration with Jiangyun Wang’s group at the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Beijing, report the rational design of metalloenzymes with heme-copper centers, unusual efficiency, and more than 1,000 turnovers in catalyzing the reduction of oxygen to water.

  • 5/10/2012

    The University of Illinois has chosen a noted nanotechnology scholar as its next provost. Ilesanmi "Ade" Adesida, dean of the UI's College of Engineering, is expected to assume the post on Aug. 16, pending UI Board of Trustees approval.

  • 5/9/2012

    With the goal of seeking sustainable solutions to the world’s safe water and sanitation challenges, the College of Engineering has established the Safe Global Water Institute (SGWI) under the direction of Benito Mariñas, a professor of civil and environmental engineering (CEE).

  • 5/1/2012

    David G. Cahill, a Willett Professor and head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has been selected as a 2012 Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS).

  • 5/1/2012

    Ann Catrina Bryce is one of the newest professors to call ECE ILLINOIS home. She comes to Urbana-Champaign from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom.

  • 4/27/2012

    Semprius, a startup company by Materials Science and Engineering Professor John Rogers has been named one of the 10 most important tech milestones of the year.

  • 4/26/2012

    University of Illinois engineers developed a method to computationally correct aberrations in three-dimensional tissue microscopy.

  • 4/25/2012

    ECE Professor Kent D. Choquette was named the 2012 recipient of the Nick Holonyak Jr. Award. Named for ECE Professor Nick Holonyak Jr., the award was established in 1997 by the Optical Society of America (OSA).

  • 4/24/2012

    Through a combination of atomic-scale materials design and ultrafast measurements, researchers at the University of Illinois have revealed new insights about how heat flows across an interface between two materials.

    Professors Paul Braun and David Cahill were also featured on NPR National News. Listen to Podcast

  • 4/23/2012

    A new University of Illinois seminar series starting in May is designed to show educators how higher education is evolving to address society’s changing needs. One of the featured speakers is a nanoscience researcher.

  • 4/20/2012

    An antibody-based strategy has considerably widened the range of analytes that can be detected with personal glucose meters, according to new work by Yu Xiang and Yi Lu at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

  • 4/20/2012

    Dr. Munir Nayfeh highlights the focus of his team’s latest research project in International Innovation.

  • 4/19/2012

    An interdisciplinary research team published an article in the journal Advanced Materials detailing research on vascularized structural composites, creating materials that are lightweight and strong with potential for self-healing, self-cooling, metamaterials, and more.

  • 4/18/2012

    University of Illinois professors Edward Diener and Jennifer A. Lewis are among 220 new members named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • 4/17/2012

    Stretchable electronics has been one of the least exploited but most researched sectors of the new electronics over the past decade. Commercialization has been elusive and a number of manufacturers have left the scene, though the participants see huge potential.

  • Colleges of Engineering and Veterinary Medicine Hold Joint Symposium
    4/16/2012

    The 2012 Symposium, held March 13, 2012, was attended by 30 faculty members from the two colleges. Twenty-six faculty members made short presentations to identify common interests and complementary expertise. The symposium proceedings have been compiled to continue to build on these interactions.

    View Proceedings

  • 4/12/2012

    University of Illinois professor Huimin Zhao has received a 2012 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.

  • 4/12/2012

    Niket Patel, a student of Amy Wagoner Johnson's will compete in the final Old Guard competition November 9-15 at ASME’s 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition in Houston.

  • 4/11/2012

    One of Professor Jian-Min "Jim" Zuo's graduate students, Hefei Hu has been selected to receive a 2012/13 Yee Memorial Fellowship from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois for his work in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy.

  • 4/5/2012

    Bringing together some of the leading energy researchers from around the globe, the International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER) satellite institution at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hosted a kick-off symposium to foster collaboration across national boundaries.

  • 4/3/2012

    Sua Myong, an assistant professor of bioengineering, and her collaborators, have received with a Research Grant from the Human Frontier Science Program to provide insights into the mechanisms underlying dynamic RNP-mediated RNA regulation.

  • 3/29/2012

    Rashid Bashir, Director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, is sharing his knowledge of science and engineering to the students in his lab, and extending that knowledge to their career choices as well.

  • 3/27/2012

    Hydration is incredibly important. In sport dehydration can affect your performance and decision making abilities but by the time you get thirsty you're already dehydrated.

  • 3/22/2012

    ECE Professor Shun Lien Chuang was a recipient of the 2011 Microoptics Conference Award.

  • 3/1/2012

    The University of Illinois Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) participated at the nanotech 2012 conference and exhibition in Tokyo, Japan from Feb 15-17. 

  • 2/9/2012

    Photonics pioneer James J. Coleman has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering. Coleman is the Intel Alumni Endowed Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois.

  • 1/12/2012

    University of Illinois materials scientists have developed a new reactive silver ink for printing high-performance electronics on ubiquitous, low-cost materials such as flexible plastic, paper or fabric substrates.

  • 1/5/2012

    A team of engineers at the University of Illinois has created a bandage that in just one week not only encourages new blood vessel growth but helps guide that growth as well.

  • 1/1/2012
    Please see previous news here.
  • 12/22/2011

    Creating semiconductor structures for high-end optoelectronic devices just got easier, thanks to University of Illinois researchers. 

  • 12/20/2011

    A team of University of Illinois engineers has developed a self-healing system that restores electrical conductivity to a cracked circuit in less time than it takes to blink.

  • 12/15/2011

    Clinical gene therapy may be one step closer, thanks to a new twist on an old class of molecules. Read more.

  • 11/8/2011

    Tiny wires could help engineers realize high-performance solar cells and other electronics, according to University of Illinois researchers. Read more

  • 10/27/2011

    New observations could improve industrial production of high-quality graphene, hastening the era of graphene-based consumer electronics, thanks to University of Illinois engineers.

  • 9/18/2011
    University of Illinois faculty Bala Murali Venkatesan and Rashid Bashir "review of the use of nanopore technology in DNA sequencing, genetics and medical diagnostics."
  • 9/10/2011

    A small electronic device slapped onto the skin like a temporary tattoo could bring us closer to a future that melds body and machine, a cyborg world where people have cell phones embedded in their throats and Internet browsers literally at their fingertips.

  • 8/15/2011

    Representatives from science programs at the University of Illinois and Parkland College, and the Champaign-Urbana Astronomy Club, will be on hand to answer questions about science at the Urbana Farmer's Market from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on selected Saturdays in August, September, and October.

  • 8/11/2011

    The pen may have bested the sword long ago, but now it's challenging wires and soldering irons.

  • 8/11/2011

    Engineers have developed a device platform that combines electronic components for sensing, medical diagnostics, communications, and human-machine interfaces, all on an ultrathin skinlike patch that mounts directly onto the skin with the ease, flexibility and comfort of a temporary tattoo.

  • 5/20/2011

    Researchers from Illinois and MIT had their work featured on the April 15, 2011 issue of Nanotechnology.

  • 4/13/2011

    Nanotechnology has found applications in pharmaceutical delivery systems and building better IT chips and is now extending into agriculture.

  • 4/8/2011

    The Ho-Am Prizes are widely regarded as the Korean equivalent of the Nobel Prizes. Ha was recognized for his pioneering application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques to reveal the behavior and physical characteristics of single biomolecules.

  • 4/4/2011

    With the first observation of thermoelectric effects at graphene contacts, researchers found that graphene transistors have a nanoscale cooling effect that reduces their temperature.

  • 3/21/2011

    The batteries in Illinois professor Paul Braun's lab look like any others, but they pack a surprise inside.

  • 3/16/2011

    While most electronic components benefit from decreased size, antennas suffer limitations in gain, efficiency, system range, and bandwidth when their size is reduced below a quarter-wavelength.

  • 3/10/2011

    Low power memory could enable longer mobile device life and faster data centers.

  • 2/22/2011

    Researchers have developed a simple method of making short protein chains with spiral structures that can also dissolve in water, two desirable traits not often found together. Such structures could have applications as building blocks for self-assembling nanostructures and as agents for drug and gene delivery.

  • 2/14/2011

    llinois physics professor Nadya Mason led a team that isolated unique electron bound states that form in graphene-superconductor junctions.

  • 2/2/2011

    In partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and industry partners, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has established the Center for Agricultural, Biomedical, and Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology.

  • 2/2/2011

    As part of their US-Pakistan scientific exchange Nanomedicine for Cancer Research Project, the University of Illinois and the University of Karachi recently held a joint Nanomedicine Symposium and Workshop at the University of Karachi International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences (ICCBS).

  • 9/20/2010

    A recently announced grant from the National Institutes of Health will establish a new M-CNTC: Midwest Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Funded by the NIH/NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer, the M-CNTC will serve as a regional hub, partnering with the Mayo Clinic, University of Illinois at Chicago, Washington University at Saint Louis, and the Indiana University School of Medicine.

  • 7/27/2010

    The University of Illinois has recently been awarded a five-year,$3.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) program aimed at producing the next generation of intellectual leaders who will define the new frontiers of Cellular Molecular Mechanics and Bio-Nanotechnology (CMMB).

  • 7/27/2010

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic are forming a strategic alliance designed to promote a broad spectrum of collaborative research, the development of new technologies and clinical tools, and the design and implementation of novel education programs.

  • 5/20/2010

    Thanks to a new semiconductor manufacturing method pioneered in the College of Engineering, the future of solar energy just got brighter.

  • 5/13/2010

    While the laws of physics weren't made to be broken, sometimes they need revision.

  • 4/23/2010

    Mihail Roco, senior advisor on nanotechnology at the National Science Foundation, will be the featured speaker at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) Annual Nanotechnology Workshop on May 6-7.

  • 3/11/2010

    ECE Professor Kyekyoon "Kevin" Kim and ECE Instructor/MNTL Research Professor Hyungsoo "Sue" Choi are co-principal investigators on a project from the USDA-Specialty Crop Research Initiative program to treat and eradicate fire blight.

  • 3/9/2010

    Advertisers have told us over the years that coffee is the best part of waking up because it tastes as good as it smells. Rearchers at the University of Illinois have come up with a way to scientifically determine whether a particular batch of coffee truly is as good as it smells.

  • 2/23/2010

    The brain, with its many folds and ridges, has the most convoluted surface of any organ in the body. But the implants currently used to monitor brain waves are rigid and only slightly flexible, making them a poor match to the brain's irregular surface.

  • 2/23/2010

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $25 million to establish the Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  • 2/16/2010

    A scientific discovery that began with an "aha" moment 13 years ago is finally coming to the silicon chip marketplace in a development that should greatly improve the reliability of the next generation of electronic devices.

  • 2/9/2010

    At-home diagnostic tests--things like cholesterol tests, pregnancy tests and blood-glucose monitors--are readily available at pharmacies around the world. But Rashid Bashir sees the possibility for a wider variety for at-home diagnostic tests, moving technologies only in labs to be available at home.

  • 12/1/2009

    Last month, the University of Illinois partnered with King Saud University and the University of Jordan to hold an Advanced Nanostructured Materials and Technology conference in Amman, Jordan. The conference was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, the University of Jordan, and King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology at the King Saud University, and other industry partners including Naizak and PolyBrite.

  • 11/19/2009

    “For me, there are lots of reasons why people are interested in nanostructures,” said ECE Professor James J. Coleman, “and right now people are talking about nanotechnology and the many possible applications.”

  • 4/28/2008

    A new low-temperature, catalyst-free technique for growing copper nanowires has been developed by researchers at Illinois. The nanowires could serve as interconnects in electronic device fabrication and as electron emitters in a television-like, very thin flat-panel display known as a field-emission display.

  • 4/21/2008

    Irfan Ahmad, associate director for the Illinois Center for Nanoscale Science and Technnology (CNST) attended a High Tech Caucus in Nanotechnology Information and Product Display hosted by various congressmen on Capitol Hill.

  • 4/11/2008

    To investigate the shielding effect of nanocomposites and the deterioration of their properties in space, University of Illinois researchers developed a set of polymer nanocomposite samples with various concentrations and sizes of nanoparticles. These were divided into two groups and mounted on "briefcase" modules attached to the exterior of the International Space Station.

  • 4/10/2008

    Water soluble, tissue-friendly hydrogels such as chitosan, starch, and gelatin are the subject of intense research surrounding their use in precision drug delivery by University of Illinois researchers.

  • 1/16/2007

    Researchers at Illinois are teaming up with counterparts in Pakistan to develop nanotechnologies which will identify potential cancer therapies which utilize native medicinal plants.

  • 1/16/2007

    U.S. scientists are working with Pakistani researchers in developing nanotechnologies to identify potential cancer therapies utilizing medicinal plants.

  • 5/2/2006

    "On this campus alone,there are hundreds of nanotechnology research projects being conducted; which are likely to have profound impact on virtually all aspects of our lives in the future," stated Irfan Ahmad,associate director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST)at Illinois.

  • 2/10/2006

    College of Engineering Interim Dean Ilesanmi Adesida and incoming University of Illinois Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Linda P.B. Katehi have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).

  • 1/28/2006

    The University of Illinois Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST), through its newest project, the Siteman Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (SCCNE) with Washington University in St. Louis, has announced the funding of three pilot projects which began on January 15, 2006.

  • 10/27/2005

    The University is among ten rearch universities around the world that have joined together to use nanotechnology to find cures for infectious diseases.

  • 10/21/2005

    Richard Herman,Chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was among the leaders of 10 research universities from around the world who gathered last week at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. to launch an international collaboration to use nanotechnology tools for global health and medical research.

  • 4/11/2005

    A new type of transistor structure, invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has broken the 600 gigahertz speed barrier. The goal of a terahertz transistor for high-speed computing and communications applications could now be within reach.

  • 4/11/2005

    Ilesanmi Adesida has been named interim-dean designate of the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign pending approval of the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • 2/1/2005

    Scientists in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) and the College of Engineering (COE) at the University of Illinois are collaborating in research that will allow them to utilize the latest applications in nanotechnology to find solutions for some of the most pressing problems facing Illinois agriculture,including disease management.

  • 9/22/2004

    The CNST Seminar Series was inaugurated in 2001 at the inception of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The objective of the series is to facilitate cross-disciplinary dialogue among campus and other academics and students on the most recent research and development issues pertaining to various aspects of nanotechnology.

  • 7/19/2004

    By depositing thin films of silicon nanoparticles on silicon substrates, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have fabricated a photodetector sensitive to ultraviolet light. Silicon-based ultraviolet sensors could prove very handy in military, security and commercial applications.

  • 5/1/2004

    Before optoelectronics godfather Nick Holonyak Jr. was awarded a US $500 000 prize for inventiveness, a crowd of leading academics, business people, and decision makers gathered on 23 April at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., to examine the future of the United States as an inventive society, and they found reasons for concern.

  • 1/24/2004

    The University of Illinois lab for studying the very tiny will soon be 50 percent larger.

  • 1/5/2004

    Put the inventor of the light-emitting diode and the maker of the world’s fastest transistor together in a research laboratory and what kinds of bright ideas might surface? One answer is a light-emitting transistor that could revolutionize the electronics industry.

  • 1/5/2004

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) researchers Peter M. Albrecht and Joseph W. Lyding have developed a novel ultra-clean deposition technique for carbon nanotubes.

  • 1/1/2004

    When IEEE Medal of Honor winner Nick Holonyak Jr. invented the light-emitting diode in the early 1960s, it would have been difficult to guess that the device would become a mainstay of a global optoelectronics industry worth billions of dollars. Now almost 40 years later, Holonyak and his colleagues Milton Feng and Walid Hafez at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, have developed a light-emitting transistor or LET, a device that could have an equally profound impact.

  • 12/3/2003

    President Bush, with a few strokes of the pen in an Oval Office ceremony on Wednesday, created a permanent federal home for the industries and institutions in the United States that are converging on the nanoscale. Businessmen, venture capitalists, politicians, advisers and a Nobel laureate stood behind the president as he signed the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act into law.

  • 11/7/2003

    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have broken their own record for the world's fastest transistor. Their latest device, with a frequency of 509 gigahertz, is 57 gigahertz faster than their previous record holder and could find use in applications such as high-speed communications products, consumer electronics and electronic combat systems.

  • 10/16/2003

    Two days, two Nobels. Two days in a row, two Nobel Prizes. Lightning struck the campus early on Oct. 6, then struck again the following day.

  • 10/10/2003

    Paul C. Lauterbur, a pioneer in the development of magnetic resonance imaging and a faculty member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He shares the prize with Sir Peter Mansfield of the University of Nottingham in England. Mansfield was a research associate in the department of physics at Illinois from 1962-1964.

  • 10/9/2003

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create a nanoscale science and engineering center with an emphasis on nanomanufacturing. The grant will provide $12.5 million in funding over five years, with the possibility of a five-year renewal.

  • 9/18/2003

    All single-walled-carbon nanotubes are not created equal. Instead, they form diverse assortments that vary markedly in features such as size and electrical properties.

  • 6/15/2003

    In the future, a doctor with a patient in need of a new bone might design one on a computer screen and then punch a button to make it reality.

  • 6/12/2003

    A "smart brick" developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign could monitor a building’s health and save lives.

  • 6/6/2003

    The Post Genomic Institute, a cutting-edge facility expected to lead the nation in biological research, was launched June 5 with a groundbreaking ceremony on the Urbana campus.

  • 6/4/2003

    A new imaging technique that uses electron diffraction waves to improve both image resolution and sensitivity to small structures has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The technique works on the same principle as X-ray diffraction, but can record structure from a single nanostructure or macromolecule.

  • 6/1/2003

    Today LEDs come in yellow, orange, green, turquoise, blue-violet, and even white. But first there was red--and first there was Nick Holonyak.

  • 5/10/2003

    The U.S. House this week approved spending $2.4 billion over the next three years on research to develop nanotechnology, so you can bet James Murday has an attentive audience wherever he goes.

  • 1/4/2002

    Researchers said this week they discovered a way to manipulate the electronic properties of atomic-scale "peapods," made of carbon molecules packed inside carbon tubes only a few atoms across -- an important step towards creating radically smaller computers.

  • 2/15/2001

    For years, scientists have tried to find an easier way to repair plastic -- to make a tennis racket that lasts longer, a surfboard that patches more easily or a fiber-glass auto body that could give a vintage Corvette a look as elegant as the day it rolled off the assembly line.

  • 3/6/2000

    A new way of making nanoparticles of silicon could open the door to exotic electronic devices and new research tools. The technology, developed by investigators at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, uses an electrochemical process and ultrasound to create tiny particles—each containing about 30 atoms and measuring about a billionth of a meter in diameter.