News & Announcements for French and Italian

News & Announcements for French and Italian

  • Charlotte Prieu receives Best Documentary Film award
    5/6/2016
    Charlotte Prieu, graduate student in French, received an award for the Best Documentary at the Feminist Film Festival of the University of Illinois for the film that she co-directed, titled "It Happens Here". The video is available on youtube: https://youtu.be/ywruUKSPKZw. Please note that it is related to sexual assault.
  • Jessica Nicholas awarded Graduate College Dissertation Completion Fellowship
    5/6/2016
    Jessica Nicholas, French PhD candidate, was awarded the Graduate College Dissertation Completion Fellowship for AY 2016-17.
  • Two Alumnae Receive National AATF Award
    5/3/2016
    The department of Emily Raiche Fellmann (MA ’02) and I (Liz Mocek Martinez MA ’10), both teachers at Lyons Township High School in La Grange, Illinois, was recognized by the AATF as an Exemplary French program (press release is here: http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/la-grange/community/chi-ugc-article-lt-french-program-receives-award-2016-04-25-story.html).
  • Nora Stoppino receives an Arnold O. Beckman Award
    4/22/2016
    Prof. Nora Stoppino received an Arnold O. Beckman Award from the UIUC Research Board for her publication project “A Chivalric Literature: A Catalogue of Chivalric Incunabula.” The Research Board selects projects of special distinction for an Arnold O. Beckman Award.
  • Enamuel Rota awarded Senior Research Fellowship
    4/18/2016
    Emanuel Rota was awarded the Senior Research Fellowship by the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory for 2016-18 for his project “Mediterranean Laziness: The Invention of a Vice". The modern concept of laziness has played and continues to play a crucial role in the criminalization of poverty. Professor Rota's project reconstructs the invention of laziness as a dispositif that allowed industrial societies to coordinate the languages of ethics, economics, and medicine in their relation with peripheral areas and individuals. By transforming laziness into a function of climate, religion, or race, not only could marginal subjects be represented as responsible for their own poverty, but also those in economically advanced societies who refused to embrace an exploitative work ethic could be represented as racially/culturally/morally inferior. His research covers the history of laziness as a vice from its emergence in early modernity to the triumph of industrial societies.