Education News

Education News

  • 7/14/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Fathers who read to their infants with autism and take active roles in caregiving activities not only promote healthy development in their children, they boost moms’ mental health too, new research suggests.
  • 7/1/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Jameson Brewer graduated from Valdosta State University with a degree in education in December 2008, just as the U.S. economy tumbled into the Great Recession. When the recession, coupled with Brewer’s limited experience as a student teacher, stymied his efforts to find a teaching position, he eventually signed on with the alternative certification program Teach for America, hoping the two-year commitment would provide the experience he needed to jumpstart his career.
  • 6/10/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Forget those ageist stereotypes that senior citizens have little interest in sex and are befuddled by technology. Many older adults are going online to dish about the joys of sex and swap advice about keeping their mojos working well into their twilight years, a new study found.
  • 5/26/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Illinois’ guaranteed-tuition law is causing tuition rates at the state’s public colleges and universities to escalate faster than they would if schools were allowed to adjust tuition rates annually, say two experts in higher education finance from the University of Illinois.
  • 5/15/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Pakpoom Buabthong, a senior in physics, displays the Deployer cellphone app, which enables users to access and share animated educational videos created by Scientific Animations without Borders. Pictured with Buabthong are SAWBO co-founders Julia Bello-Bravo and Barry Pittendrigh.
  • 5/4/2015Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    Infectious disease expert Mosoka P. Fallah, one of five “Ebola fighters” honored as a Person of the Year by Time in 2014, will be among the speakers at an upcoming symposium at the University of Illinois.
  • 5/1/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    By most media accounts, education reform in post-Katrina New Orleans is a success. Test scores and graduation rates are up, and students once trapped in failing schools have their choice of charter schools throughout the city.
  • 3/31/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Bullying perpetration decreased by 20 percent over a three-year period among youths with disabilities who participated in a social and emotional learning program, a new study found.
  • 2/20/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The education experts cited in media stories and blog posts may have little background in research or education policy, suggests a new study by, left, curriculum specialist Joel R. Malin and education professor Christopher Lubienski, both at the University of Illinois.
  • 2/4/2015Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    A new study found Illinois educators and lawmakers have homework to do to figure out why fewer girls at the state’s high schools study subjects associated with careers in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields than their peers in other states.
  • 1/16/2015Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    A curricula that is widely used by U.S. schools to diminish bullying and other forms of aggression shows promise at reducing gender- and sexual-based violence. However, the program’s efficacy may vary between geographic regions, and it may not directly reduce bullying, physical aggression and victimization, a new study found.
  • 1/12/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Families whose children with autism spectrum disorders spend less than 20 percent of their time in mainstream classrooms are nearly twice as likely to resort to litigation, such as filing for due process hearings or mediation, when they disagree with school officials about their children’s education, according to a recent survey of parents.
  • 11/19/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Youth who enter puberty ahead of their peers are at heightened risk of depression, although the disease develops differently in girls than in boys, a new study suggests.
  • 11/17/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    When art historian Allen Stuart Weller died in 1997, he left behind a rough manuscript for a biography of Lorado Taft, the Illinois sculptor who helped the city of Chicago carve its reputation as a place of beauty and grandeur. When historian Stephen Thomas and art historian Robert G. La France came across the unfinished manuscript among Weller’s papers in the University of Illinois Archives, they found Weller’s story on Taft’s rise to prominence so compelling that they couldn’t let it go untold.
  • 11/5/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The history, challenges and controversies surrounding two-year colleges are explored in a new book co-edited by two faculty members at the University of Illinois.
  • 11/3/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A social computer game designed by researchers in computer science and educational psychology at the University of Illinois can identify bullies in elementary school classrooms and help scholars better understand peer aggression, whether it occurs face to face or online.
  • 11/3/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    A common perception, especially outside the university classroom, is that teaching and research are two separate domains, with little overlap. That’s not the reality, however, for many University of Illinois faculty – including those whose 18 essays appear in “An Illinois Sampler: Teaching and Research on the Prairie,” recently published by the University of Illinois Press.
  • 10/29/2014Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor

    Boys who engage in homophobic teasing are prone to perpetrating sexual harassment two years later, according to a new study led by Dorothy Espelage, the Gutgsell Endowed Professor of child development in the College of Education at the University of Illinois.

  • 10/20/2014Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    Ann P. Kaiser, the Susan W. Gray Professor of Education and Human Development at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture at the University of Illinois.
  • 10/9/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    James D. Anderson, an expert on desegregation and American education history and faculty member at the University of Illinois, will deliver the 11th annual Brown Lecture in Education Research.
  • 10/9/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    In a unique research project funded by the National Science Foundation, education professor Gloriana González at the University of Illinois is developing animated cartoons to help geometry instructors become better teachers.
  • 9/24/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A number of studies have suggested that religion plays a critical role in black Americans’ mental health and life satisfaction, aiding their ability to cope with personal and societal stressors. However, a new study indicates that spirituality, rather than religiosity, may be the element that is essential to black women’s psychological well-being.
  • 9/17/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Egypt’s 2011 revolution, described at the time as a “Facebook revolution,” made Linda Herrera a big believer in the power of social media. A past resident of Cairo who had studied the online culture of Egyptian youth and followed events through their Facebook pages, the University of Illinois education professor became, for a moment in time, a “complete cyber-optimist.”
  • 9/4/2014Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    Young adults in Illinois who recently obtained coverage under Illinois’ expanded Medicaid program said they were unfamiliar with “Obamacare” and were unaware that their Medicaid benefits were related to the federal health care law, according to a new survey of community college students conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 8/26/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    While state lawmakers honored provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 by not slashing their appropriations for higher education during the recent economic crisis, a new analysis by higher education expert Jennifer A. Delaney indicates that the stimulus program may have failed to promote college access and affordability.
  • 8/11/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A new study of middle-school youth reveals the powerful role of school culture, including teachers’ and staff members’ perceptions, in creating environments that promote or discourage bullying and bystander intervention.
  • 6/11/2014Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    Self-administered surveys are a vital tool for researchers who gather sensitive information about adolescents. But young people who provide untruthful answers on questionnaires as pranks have the potential to throw researchers’ findings way off track, particularly studies that involve minority groups.
  • 5/22/2014Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    Family debt diminishes students’ prospects of graduating from college, and is particularly detrimental to black students’ chances of earning degrees, suggests a new study by social work professor Min Zhan and doctoral student Deirdre Lanesskog, both at the University of Illinois.
  • 5/19/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    While leisure activities are essential to physical and emotional well-being and quality of life – they also can be very stressful for people with disabilities, a new study suggests.
  • 4/8/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    More than one in five youth in middle school has experienced physical sexual violence such as being inappropriately touched against their will while at school, a new study suggests.
  • 3/20/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Catherine P. Corr, a doctoral student in special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named a recipient of a Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being.
  • 3/17/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Many characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders can be identified by the age of 2 and are predictive of which children will be diagnosed with these disorders when they’re older, a new study suggests.
  • 3/10/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    More than 40 years after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down sponsored prayer and scripture readings in the nation’s public schools, the role of religion in education remains a sharply divisive topic in many communities.
  • 2/10/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Service-learning projects have become popular in U.S. public schools for teaching citizenship values. However, these curricula may be failing at their civic mission by promoting narrow views of civic engagement and marginalizing people with disabilities, say experts in special education at the University of Illinois and the University of Maine.
  • 1/16/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Preschoolers who engage in challenging behaviors – patterns of behavior that interfere with learning and social interaction – are at increased risk of academic failure and peer rejection, among other poor outcomes.
  • 11/13/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Officials from Jiangxi Normal University in Nanching, China, and the University of Illinois will sign an agreement establishing a Confucius Institute at the Urbana campus during an event Thursday (Nov. 14).
  • 11/11/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A new book challenges popular assumptions about the superiority of private-school education and raises questions about the political imperatives behind current school-reform and policy initiatives that are based on market theory.
  • 11/4/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    New research from the University of Illinois indicates that elementary school students and their teachers often don’t agree on who bullies whom in their classrooms. And researchers say that intervention and prevention programs need to both heighten teachers’ awareness of bullying and provide support for victims that mitigate its impact on their academic achievement.
  • 9/10/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Illinois officials need to re-examine enrollment and funding policies for the state's public early childhood education programs to eliminate barriers that may keep the neediest of children from attending.
  • 8/26/2013Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    Education professor Saundra Murray Nettles is the author of the new book, "Necessary Spaces: Exploring the Richness of African American Childhood in the South" (Information Age Publishing Inc., 2013).
  • 7/15/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Boys exposed to familial violence, including conflict between siblings, become increasingly aggressive toward their peers at school, and this aggression is associated with greater levels of alcohol and drug use over time, a new study by a University of Illinois researcher suggests.
  • 5/6/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Middle school children who completed a social-emotional skills learning program at school were 42 percent less likely to engage in physical fighting a year later, according to a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study, which is ongoing, involves more than 3,600 children at 36 middle schools across Illinois and Kansas, the largest sample to date used to investigate the impact of a social-emotional skills learning program on the behavior of middle school students.
  • 4/18/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The presence of gangs in the vicinity of schools creates a pervasive climate of fear and victimization among students, teachers and administrators that escalates the level of aggression in bullying incidents and paralyzes prevention efforts, suggests a new study in the journal Psychology of Violence.
  • 4/9/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The quality of the social relationships that newly hired people develop with other employees in their work groups is critical to newcomers job satisfaction, learning their responsibilities and their ability to fit in to the workplace culture, a new study suggests.
  • 3/25/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The role of culture in educational and social interventions will be the focus of a conference in Chicago to be hosted by the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/7/2013Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    U.S. high school sink or swim placement policies that propel immigrant students into courses that theyre linguistically and academically unprepared for or conversely, that funnel all newcomers into remedial courses or service-oriented vocational programs may undermine these students academic success and their motivation to learn, new research suggests.
  • 2/4/2013Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    Bullied teens often are assured that it gets better. And a new study suggests that bullying does, indeed, tend to decline as teens progress through high school and move toward adulthood.
  • 2/4/2013Madeline Ley writer Madeline Ley by Madeline Ley published by Madeline Ley
    The Web has become a little more wild with the introduction of a website that explores human interactions with the natural world. The Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois recently created a classroom-focused website called Wildlife Encounters to educate students of all ages about the world around them.
  • 11/12/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth and those questioning their sexuality are at significantly greater risk of truancy and of considering and attempting suicide than their heterosexual classmates even when bullying isnt involved, according to a new study of more than 11,000 middle and high school students.
  • 11/2/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Karen Erickson, a literacy expert, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois on Nov. 8. Ericksons talk is titled Conditions of Literacy Learning Success for Students With Significant Disabilities.
  • 10/9/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    As Greece struggles to rebuild its shattered economy, humanitarian agencies worry about the impact that the nations stringent reductions in wages and social services may have on vulnerable populations such as the Roma (also known as Romani, gypsies and travelers), many of whom live in extreme poverty on societys fringes.
  • 10/2/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Todays teachers face classrooms of students who cut their teeth using electronic communications, and two education scholars at the University of Illinois have just released both a software application and a new book that they believe will profoundly change the teaching of literacy for this technology-savvy group and generations to come.
  • 10/1/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Celebrated authors of books for children and adults will share their enthusiasm for their craft in a series of events as part of the College of Educations annual Youth Literature Festival, to be observed Thursday-Saturday (Oct. 4-6).
  • 9/11/2012Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    Incidents such as the one that took place at Normal Community High School on Friday (Sept. 7), during which a student armed with a gun briefly took classmates and a teacher hostage at the Illinois school before being subdued, provide sobering reminders that crisis plans are as imperative as lesson plans in U.S. schools today.
  • 8/27/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Photos of happy, smiling faces on patient education websites may engage readers, but they also may have a negative impact on older adults comprehension of vital health information, especially those elderly patients who are the least knowledgeable about their medical condition to begin with, suggests a new study.
  • 7/24/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Students with cognitive and learning disabilities that engaged in a self-directed learning program were more likely to access mainstream instruction and achieve their academic or other goals, suggests research by Karrie A. Shogren, a special education expert at the University of Illinois.
  • 7/2/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Girls with poor self-control become as physically aggressive as the average boy when theyre bullied, suggests a new study by psychologists at the University of Illinois.
  • 7/2/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Young adult survivors of childhood cancer often have problems maintaining jobs and relationships, researchers have found. A new study of childhood brain tumor survivors by disability researcher David Strauser, a professor of community health at the University of Illinois, suggests that a battle with cancer during a critical developmental period in middle childhood may negatively affect career readiness and achievement as an adult by compromising childrens development of an effective work personality.
  • 5/29/2012Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    The partnership of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. with American Public University to provide online college degree programs to Walmarts U.S. workforce has generated skepticism among some in academia.
  • 5/2/2012Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Four classes, four continents. About every two years, a small class of University of Illinois journalism students under the supervision of professor Nancy Benson reports from a different part of the world, taking a two-week turn as foreign correspondents.
  • 4/23/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Does hearing that you are a member of an elite group of chess players, say, or scholars enhance your performance on tasks related to your alleged area of expertise? Not necessarily, say researchers who tested how sweeping pronouncements about the skills or likely success of social groups can influence childrens performance.
  • 3/7/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Brainiacs of all ages are invited to explore the mysteries of the brain and nervous system March 11 during an afternoon of games and activities at the Orpheum Childrens Science Museum in Champaign. The event, F.I.N.D. Orphy, will kick off a new science education outreach program jointly sponsored by the Orpheum and the University of Illinois that highlights the research of the universitys neuroscientists.
  • 3/6/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A new study by researchers in the College of Education at the University of Illinois suggests that social networking and video sharing applications could be effective in helping women transcend their computer anxiety and bridge the digital divide.
  • 2/21/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Companies that want to motivate workers to use electronic-based or digital training programs need to make training modules fun and stimulating whenever they can, and offer extrinsic incentives, such as wage increases and user support, when employees need extra enticement, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 1/18/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A program designed to boost cognition in older adults also increased their openness to new experiences, researchers report, demonstrating for the first time that a non-drug intervention in older adults can change a personality trait once thought to be fixed throughout the lifespan.
  • 1/9/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Families that have high amounts of unsecured debt, such as outstanding credit card balances and payday loans, diminish their childrens prospects of attending or graduating from college, according to a new study by social work professors Min Zhan at the University of Illinois and Michael Sherraden, the founder of the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis.
  • 12/19/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A new study of more than 346 middle-school children indicates that boys are less likely than girls to intervene to protect a bullying victim, especially if the boy is a member of a peer group in which bullying is the norm. The study also suggests that anti-bullying programs that focus on bystander intervention and empathy training arent likely to have much impact unless attention is given to reducing bullying perpetration within childrens peer groups.
  • 12/12/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The 3-year-old Illinois Professional Science Masters program got its start during a recession, but most of its 2010 graduates are already pursuing careers in the fields they chose. It took most a few months to find work, although some and at least two of the 2011 graduating class were offered jobs while still in school.
  • 10/24/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    With an increasing number of children wired from an early age, adept at playing computer games and surfing the Web by elementary school, future teachers need to know how to integrate educational games into their teaching practice, according to Wen-Hao (David) Huang, a professor in the department of education policy, organization and leadership in the College of Education.
  • 10/13/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth are at greater risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, bullying by their peers and truancy, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 10/10/2011Dusty Rhodes, News Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, News Editor by Dusty Rhodes, News Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, News Editor
    A panel of local educators who specialize in meeting the needs of immigrant children will discuss strategies for providing early childhood and elementary education to young Latinos at noon on Oct. 14 (Friday).
  • 9/27/2011Dusty Rhodes, News Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, News Editor by Dusty Rhodes, News Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, News Editor
    John Q. Easton will discuss his most recent book, Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons From Chicago, in two lectures at the University of Illinois next week.
  • 9/21/2011Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    African American children who have mainly African American friends may be viewed as cool and more popular by their classmates but white students who affiliate mostly with other white students may be perceived less positively, according to a new study co-authored by education professor Philip C. Rodkin.
  • 9/15/2011Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    Policymakers may want to rethink how they determine when children with limited English skills are fluent enough to learn in English-only classrooms, says a new study by an education professor at the University of Illinois.
  • 8/30/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Many wonder why bullies bully, but a new study looks at the other side of the equation: How do children respond to bullying and why? The answer, researchers say, may lead to more effective interventions to reduce the negative consequences and perhaps even the frequency of bullying.
  • 8/15/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Children who bully others are more likely to perpetrate sexual violence when they enter adolescence, according to a new study led by bullying expert Dorothy Espelage at the University of Illinois.
  • 8/2/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    A new study by a scholar at the University of Illinois suggests that the U.S. may not be falling as far behind its industrialized peers in educating future generations of scientists as previously thought. Significantly more female and minority college students are majoring in and obtaining degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields than reports have indicated if these disciplines, known by the acronym STEM, are viewed broadly.
  • 6/2/2011Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor
    Kindergartners who listen to stories about their similarities with children who have disabilities and engage in activities with peers who have special needs are more socially accepting, develop better communication skills and are less likely to engage in bullying behaviors, according to a new study by two special education professors.
  • 5/11/2011Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor
    For the U.S. to achieve President Barack Obamas goal of having the largest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020, educators, policymakers and families will need to address the barriers that discourage minorities from pursuing higher education. A new study by Lorenzo DuBois Baber, a professor of higher education at the University of Illinois, sheds light on the unique challenges facing African American and Latino males.
  • 3/24/2011Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Education professors Joseph P. Robinson and Sarah Lubienski say a gap in reading and math scores still exists in lower grades.
  • 3/15/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    One of the tests used in diagnosing prostate cancer is so stigmatized within Latino culture that men may be risking their lives to avoid it, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 3/7/2011Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    While social media such as Facebook and Twitter have transformed the way people communicate, educational practices havent kept pace, relying on outdated, limited tools such as standardized tests that dont reflect the profound changes precipitated by the Web. An interdisciplinary team of experts at the University of Illinois is developing software that they believe will transform the practice of writing assessment and potentially eliminate cumbersome proficiency testing such as that mandated by state and federal agencies as a result of the No Child Left Behind Act.
  • 2/23/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Charter schools as agents of change in American education will be the focus of a March 15 symposium at the Illini Center in Chicago that will feature scholars who have varying perspectives on the issue.
  • 2/23/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    New teacher induction and mentoring will be the focus of the Illinois New Teacher Collaboratives sixth annual conference.
  • 2/10/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    The College of Education at the University of Illinois recently announced a restructuring that is expected to better support collaborative research and teaching by merging three departments. The merger also is expected to help the college maximize resources, be more competitive in obtaining external funding and address high-impact research and policy initiatives on the state and national levels. The restructuring, which took effect Jan. 1, created a department called Education Policy, Organization and Leadership from the former departments of educational policy studies, educational organization and leadership, and human resource education.
  • 2/9/2011Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    The Office of Community College Research and Leadership, a unit in the College of Educationat the University of Illinois, has begun a four-year project examining applied baccalaureate degree programs, which build upon historically terminal associate degrees, providing the upper-level course work and classes that help students progress through the baccalaureate level.
  • 2/4/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Parents of preschoolers who want to explore and ask questions about the opportunities available at the new Booker T. Washington Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics magnet elementary school in Champaign are invited to a panel discussion Feb. 16 (Wednesday) on the University of Illinois campus.
  • 1/25/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Anjali Forber-Pratt, a graduate student at the University of Illinois, won the gold medal in the 200-meter race Tuesday, the fourth day of the 2011 International Paralympic Committee Athletics World Championships, in Christchurch, New Zealand.
  • 11/29/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    African American college students who have internalized a positive racial identity yet feel connected to other social groups report higher levels of psychological well-being than peers who have externalized or conflicted racial identities and spurn cultural inclusivity, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 11/23/2010Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois indicates that children who spend in excess of 30 hours per week in non-relative care through the age of 4 1/2 may be exposed to a social environment that popularizes aggression, leading some children to become more physically aggressive than peers who spend less time in nonmaternal care.
  • 11/10/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Art Baroody, a professor emeritus of education, has developed a computer program to teach children math.
  • 10/25/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Maryann Romski, an expert in language disorders in children, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois on Thursday (Oct. 28).
  • 9/14/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Nationally known and emerging authors, illustrators, poets and storytellers will engage with their young readers and readers young at heart during the second Youth Literature Festival. The festival, to take place Oct. 9 at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on the University of Illinois campus, celebrates the ways in which written works enrich the lives of young people and promotes reading as a fun activity.
  • 8/10/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    Jennifer A. Delaney, a professor of educational organization and leadership at Illinois, says the timeline for restoring funding for higher education to pre-recessionary levels will inevitably lengthen, or in a worst-case scenario, the funds may simply never reappear.
  • 7/15/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    High schools need to work with community colleges to align their curricula better and to reduce the number of students who need to enroll in remedial courses, according to a University of Illinois expert who studies community college education policy.
  • 6/18/2010Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor
    Colleges and universities are under siege from an array of economic, political and cultural forces that are dramatically changing higher education as we know it but not for the better, according to Cary Nelson, a professor emeritus of English at the University of Illinois.
  • 5/20/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    A sink-or-swim mentality for socializing new employees will ultimately only drain organizations of its best talent over time, according to new research by Russell F. Korte, a University of Illinois expert in workplace dynamics.
  • 4/28/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    Brendesha Tynes, a professor of educational psychology and of African American studies at the University of Illinois, has been awarded a $1.4 million grant to study the effects of online racial discrimination. The grant is from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
  • 4/21/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    Images from racial theme parties that are posted on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace not only elicit different reactions from different people based on their race and their attitudes toward diversity, they also represent an indirect way to express racist views about minorities, according to published research by a University of Illinois professor who studies the convergence of race and the Internet.
  • 4/15/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    An approach to teaching young children the principles of writing and literacy that prohibits them from borrowing from our common cultural landscape is a problematic one, according to a University of Illinois professor who studies childhood learning and literacy development.
  • 4/13/2010Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Despite growth in recent decades, unionization of higher education faculty remains contested, and its modern concerns can be traced back to the 1910s and 1920s, according to a University of Illinois expert in historical issues involving faculty work and faculty workers.
  • 3/15/2010Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor
    Mastering mathematics can be daunting for many children, but researchers have found that children with visual impairments face disproportionate challenges learning math, and by the time they reach the college level, they are significantly under-represented in science, technology, mathematics and engineering disciplines.
  • 2/22/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    The lack of affordable, high-quality on-campus day care programs that cater to undergraduate students who double as parents is a stealth issue that has the potential to harm both the student-parent and the child, says a University of Illinois expert in early childhood education.
  • 1/15/2010Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    What we learn from our siblings when we grow up has for better or for worse a considerable influence on our social and emotional development as adults, according to an expert in sibling, parent-child and peer relationships at the University of Illinois.
  • 12/15/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    A new study co-written by a University of Illinois expert in math education suggests that incorporating technology in high school-level geometry classes not only makes the teaching of concepts such as congruency easier, it also empowers students to discover other geometric relationships they wouldnt ordinarily uncover.
  • 10/28/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    The underlying similarities between teaching, research and music can be a powerful metaphor for education and qualitative inquiry, according to a University of Illinois professor of education.
  • 9/24/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    To adequately prepare todays students for tomorrows global economy, teacher education expert Mark Dressman favors transcultural education, which he defines as an experience that goes beyond the traditional rite-of-passage trip to western Europe.
  • 9/3/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Whether theyre found in a museum or a textbook, historical narratives about traumatic events such as war and genocide are better left to older students, who have typically developed a more refined historical consciousness, says a University of Illinois professor who studies and teaches historical instruction.
  • 8/12/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Mothers and fathers play different roles and make different contributions to a childs upbringing, but a fathers influence upon a childs academic success later in life is felt the most when hes involved from the very beginning, says a University of Illinois expert in early childhood education.
  • 7/23/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    A U. of I. professor who studies the sociology of education says that “soft skills” are better predictors of earnings and higher educational achievement later in life than having good grades and high standardized test scores.
  • 7/21/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    The story of the politics and policies of public education for newly freed slaves in post-bellum Mississippi is the subject of Christopher Span’s new book, “From Cotton Field to Schoolhouse: African American Education in Mississippi, 1862-1875” (The University of North Carolina Press). Span is a professor of educational policy studies at the University of Illinois.
  • 7/15/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    A market-based approach to increasing school choice actually leads to fewer educational opportunities, particularly for disadvantaged students in urban areas, according to a University of Illinois expert in education.
  • 7/14/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Popular culture may have an uncharitable attitude toward community colleges, but a University of Illinois expert in education says they are an underfunded community asset and an invaluable resource for first-generation college students, low-skilled adult workers and immigrants aspiring to enter college, and downsized workers and mid-career changers transitioning to a recession-proof career.
  • 6/18/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    David Brown, a professor in the U. of I. College of Education and expert in science education, says that interactive web-based science tutorials can be effective tools for helping elementary school teachers construct powerful explanatory models of difficult scientific concepts.
  • 5/4/2009Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor writer Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor by Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor published by Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor
    A persistent assault by the political right threatens to erode nearly century-old principles of academic freedom that have made U.S. universities a model for the world, a new book co-written by a University of Illinois legal expert warns.
  • 4/30/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    Applied baccalaureate degree programs at community colleges not only offer a path for non-traditional students to earn a bachelor’s degree, but they also help state and local governments address shortages in the workforce, according to a University of Illinois expert.
  • 4/21/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    African-American and Hispanic students placed in ability groups for reading instruction learned less compared to demographically similar minority students who weren’t grouped by ability, a new study by a University of Illinois expert in the sociology of education found.
  • 4/9/2009
    Universities need to embrace new online media, social networks and a culture of “openness” as part of their pedagogy, or they risk becoming seen as anachronisms in today’s hyper-connected world where information is available freely, says a University of Illinois expert who studies the knowledge economy’s effect on higher education.
  • 2/25/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    In another “Freakonomics”-style study that turns conventional wisdom about public- versus private-school education on its head, a team of University of Illinois education professors has found that public-school students outperform their private-school classmates on standardized math tests.
  • 2/12/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    As fans of talk-show host Jay Leno’s man-on-the-street interviews know, Americans suffer from a national epidemic of historical and civic ignorance. But just because most Americans know more about “American Idol” than they do about American government doesn’t necessarily mean it’s entirely their fault.
  • 1/26/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    Parents and educators who favor traditional classroom-style learning over free, unstructured playtime in preschool and kindergarten may actually be stunting a child’s development instead of enhancing it, according to a University of Illinois professor who studies childhood learning and literacy development.
  • 1/8/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    According to a new study published by a University of Illinois professor who studies race and the Internet, adolescents are increasingly experiencing both individual and vicarious discrimination online, which in turn triggers stress, depression and anxiety.
  • 1/6/2009Phil Ciciora, Education Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Education Editor by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Education Editor
    According to an Illinois education professor, one standardized test should not be taken as a final verdict on the quality of math and science education in U.S. elementary schools.
  • 12/16/2008Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    The naming of Arne Duncan, chief executive of the Chicago public school system, to run the U.S. Department of Education signals that education will not be second-tier issue in a Barack Obama presidency, says James D. Anderson, the Gutsgell Professor of educational policy studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 12/9/2008Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Much more cross-gender bullying – specifically, unpopular boys harassing popular girls – occurs in later elementary school grades than previously thought, meaning educators should take reports of harassment from popular girls seriously, according to new research by a University of Illinois professor who studies child development.
  • 11/26/2008Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Traditional classroom teaching in higher education could learn a thing or two from online teaching, otherwise known as e-learning, according to a University of Illinois professor who studies computer-mediated communication, information exchange and the Internet.
  • 6/23/2008Jim Paul, IGPA writer Jim Paul, IGPA by Jim Paul, IGPA published by Jim Paul, IGPA
    While a large majority of Illinoisans say higher education is very important to achieve success, most of them believe the state’s colleges and universities are good but not great, according to a survey conducted for the University of Illinois.
  • 5/23/2008Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    tudents in public schools learn as much or more math between kindergarten and fifth grade as similar students in private schools, according to a new University of Illinois study of multi-year, longitudinal data on nearly 10,000 students.
  • 11/6/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Is there such a thing as being too safe on the Internet? One University of Illinois education researcher believes there is, at least when teenagers are concerned.
  • 10/18/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    How to spot the early signs of autism and intervene will be the subject of a pubic talk Nov. 1 on the University of Illinois campus.
  • 8/10/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    In the battle against drugs in the 1980s and '90s, schools overwhelmingly embraced the DARE program before research came to seriously question its effectiveness.
  • 8/2/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Aging adults may joke about memory lapses and "early Alzheimer's." They may worry when they can't understand a drug plan or lose track of the characters in a novel.
  • 7/25/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Eighty local teachers, nearly double the number from last year - along with more than 40 school administrators - are expected to take part in the third annual Chancellor's Academy, which starts Monday (July 30).
  • 5/31/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    It is the central argument in many recent desegregation and affirmative action lawsuits, including school cases now before the U.S. Supreme Court: The 14th Amendment was written to make the Constitution color-blind and race-neutral.
  • 4/25/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The assessment of college knowledge - what students have learned during their time on campus - has been moved to the forefront in many discussions on the future of higher education.
  • 4/23/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The culture of a school can dampen - or exacerbate - the violent or disruptive tendencies of aggressive young teens, new research indicates. A large-scale study from the University of Illinois found that while personal traits and peer interactions have the most direct effect on the aggressive behavior of middle school students, the school environment also influences student aggression.
  • 4/11/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    There is no certainty in science, no such thing as "the truth." Nor is science completely rational, objective or free of cultural influence. There is no step-by-step procedure for doing science, no "scientific method," says University of Illinois education professor Fouad Abd-El-Khalick.
  • 2/19/2007Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Keeping quality teachers in Illinois classrooms will be the agenda for a statewide conference Feb. 27-28 in Springfield, Ill., expected to draw more than 350 educators and policymakers.
  • 2/15/2007Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    A new, three-way partnership joins the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Tsinghua University in Beijing and several multinational corporations with the goal of educating a new breed of professionals better prepared for success in the global marketplace.
  • 10/18/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    What could an English-speaking American reading expert hope to discover from studying how Chinese learn their language? And what might he and his colleagues have to offer as a result?
  • 9/29/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    In a small public library not far from the University of Illinois campus, talking is encouraged, and animated discussions not only are tolerated, they are provoked.
  • 9/27/2006Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Curious minds over age 50 will soon find new opportunities to learn and explore, thanks to the establishment of an Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 8/23/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Can a devastating flood set the stage for the transformation of a school system?
  • 7/17/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Animation is a proven vehicle for biting comedy, a la ?"The Simpsons" and "South Park."
  • 6/1/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Whether it's prayer in schools, alternatives to evolution, or courses on the Bible, the debate continues on the role of religion in public schools.
  • 2/24/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    It's a central premise of the "No Child Left Behind" Act and proven in numerous studies: Quality teachers influence student learning perhaps more than any other factor. Yet up to half of new teachers, including many highly qualified teachers, leave the profession within their first five years.
  • 2/20/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    More women are pursuing higher education and doctoral degrees than ever before, but women still are rare in the math-oriented professions. Yet, researchers say, girls perform just as well as boys on achievement tests and tend to earn better grades in math than do boys during the earlier school years.
  • 2/13/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Why is public education and its proper funding so essential? Is American education adequately funded? How do we determine and measure what is adequate? What are the trends in Illinois?
  • 1/23/2006Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Contrary to common wisdom, public schools score higher in math than private ones, when differences in student backgrounds are taken into account.
  • 11/17/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    College is becoming a requirement for more and more jobs.
  • 11/9/2005Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor
    University Institutional Review Boards, which oversee research involving human subjects, need to be revamped to avoid the "mission creep" that is threatening academic freedom and restricting research on the nation's campuses, according to a report by University of Illinois researchers and scholars.
  • 8/15/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    New teachers in Illinois will get help where they need it, and access to mentoring from veteran and National Board Certified teachers. Administrators will get advice on supporting new teachers during their first crucial years in the classroom.
  • 7/26/2005Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    A survey of middle school girls reveals that their self-confidence in math suffers when their parents believe the gender stereotype that holds that math is a male domain and when the parents give unsolicited help with homework.
  • 7/5/2005Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor
    The composition of governing boards of most U.S. public universities does not reflect the expanded mission, programs and sources of support of higher education, the former president of the University of Illinois writes in an article.
  • 6/16/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    About 400 Illinois teachers and administrators are going to school this summer, the first of them this week (June 13-17), to upgrade their technology and teaching skills at seven sites throughout the state.
  • 6/3/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Teachers in several Champaign and Urbana public schools will have a new opportunity for professional development starting this summer, as a result of a partnership between local school districts and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 6/1/2005Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    Advancements in science education will bloom on the prairie as middle school teachers from mostly rural Illinois school districts converge at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on June 13 to participate in the two-week Prairie Flowers Program.
  • 4/18/2005Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Puzzles, brain-teasers, games and creative problem-solving. For many, they're a fun diversion, but could they also help keep seniors mentally vibrant as they age?
  • 4/11/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Students do better in private schools, according to common wisdom - and some well-regarded data now more than two decades old.
  • 4/4/2005Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    All education is global. At least that's the perspective of a new online master's degree program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/25/2004Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Sexuality is not an easy topic for discussion as it relates to schools, but what is left unsaid can cause a lot of harm, says Cris Mayo, a professor of education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the author of a new book.
  • 9/13/2004Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    High school students in technology education courses will start thinking more like engineers if a new $10 million National Science Foundation grant, involving the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has the desired effect.
  • 8/2/2004Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Science is not just evidence, but intuition. It is not just procedures, but creativity. Its conclusions are not set in stone, but ever-changing and open to question as part of a dynamic social enterprise.
  • 4/23/2004Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    The Title IX legislation of 1972 has been celebrated for the dramatic benefits it brought to girls in school sports.
  • 3/15/2004Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Access to assistive technologies (AT) may be a critical factor in the employment success of persons with spinal cord injury or disease (SCID), according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/15/2004Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has long been known for its pioneering programs and services for students with disabilities. And judging by results of recent studies of employment outcomes for university graduates with severe disabilities, those programs are continuing to make their mark.
  • 12/11/2003Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Whether in the classroom or the boardroom, chalkboards have been replaced nearly universally by computer-aided audiovisual presentations that commonly involve a laptop computer and Microsoft PowerPoint software. And while that change has proved beneficial for most presenters and their audiences, a notable exception is for people with disabilities.
  • 10/21/2003Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Baseball is pitching, hitting, running the bases.
  • 9/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Internet filters may help protect parents from their fears, and schools from lawsuits, but they're "highly imperfect" tools for protecting children, says Nicholas Burbules.
  • 8/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    On the road to trigonometry and calculus, children must first comprehend 1, 2 and 3.
  • 8/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Suicide is said to be a "cry for help," but the evidence suggests the contrary. Most college students who threaten or attempt to kill themselves will adamantly, even defiantly, resist any counseling that's offered.
  • 7/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    An innovative program for online group mentoring of new teachers, one of a handful in the United States, is branching out from East Central Illinois to other parts of the state.
  • 6/17/2003Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    More than 400 Illinois teachers are upgrading their computer and technology skills this summer at eight sites throughout the state.
  • 6/1/2003Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    When Jimmy first came in contact with Cody, a black, backpack-toting Labrador retriever assigned to assist with the severely disabled 16-year-old's therapy, he wasn't exactly afraid of the dog. But he didn't want to touch Cody, and he cried a lot when the dog got close.
  • 4/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has become a center of research and assistance on the education and care of young children.
  • 4/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Most U.S. educators believe that equality in education and citizenship rights are necessary elements for a vital and working democracy.
  • 3/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Oral arguments are to be made next month in two University of Michigan affirmative action cases now in the U.S. Supreme Court. No matter what the eventual outcome, Michigan succeeded in shifting the debate on the issue, says Denise Green, a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It also may have set a new standard for how universities respond to similar cases or other significant public challenges.
  • 3/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Hundreds of special education jobs sit vacant in Chicago, as they do throughout the country. Other jobs are filled by teachers who need a higher certification, but can't easily leave their jobs to get it.
  • 2/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Peer-group influence on adolescents is well established, especially regarding drugs and alcohol. New research indicates it also extends to bullying behavior.
  • 1/21/2003Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Peer-group influence on adolescents is well established, especially regarding drugs and alcohol. New research indicates it also extends to bullying behavior.
  • 12/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Next semester, students at the University of Illinois will have the opportunity to look beyond today's headlines to explore in-depth topics such as homeland defense, terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.
  • 12/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Preparing preschoolers to read - and to love reading - means more than minding their Ps and Qs.
  • 11/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Does sexual harassment among classmates have its roots in elementary school? Is it really about sex or about gaining power and status among peers? Could sexual harassment in schools be a "training ground" for later domestic violence?
  • 10/1/2002Karen Green, public information officer, NCSA writer Karen Green, public information officer, NCSA by Karen Green, public information officer, NCSA published by Karen Green, public information officer, NCSA
    A new program led by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) in Illinois and East Carolina University (ECU) in North Carolina will introduce teachers in rural areas of those states to cutting-edge technologies that can expand the scope of science and mathematics education in small-town middle and high schools.
  • 10/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Illinois schools that have moved to implement state learning standards are seeing higher test scores, more-focused instruction, and more equity in the classroom, according to the final report from a unique four-year study by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    Like the rest of the population, college students typically engage in a wide range of traditional leisure pursuits - from reading and listening to music to participation in sports. But there's a whole "other" side to leisure among this population that leisure scholars have only recently begun to examine more closely.
  • 8/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Parents, teachers and caregivers of young children have plenty to worry about, and the approach of another school year often heightens their anxiety. They know a child's early years can be key to development and school success.
  • 6/26/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Girls generally make better grades than do boys, but a new study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign shows that girls also experience more internal costs -- worry, anxiety and depression -- despite their academic success. "
  • 6/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Getting into this special summer math class was easy: All students had to do was fail the entry exam.
  • 5/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    Research on stuttering conducted during the past 13 years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has produced a wealth of new knowledge about the cause, onset, early characteristics, and developmental course of the disorder. And, according to Ehud Yairi, professor of speech and hearing science and director of the Stuttering Research Project at Illinois, that work has resulted in a re-examination of traditional therapeutic strategies for treating young children who stutter.
  • 5/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Plagiarism isn't just a problem for publishers and best-selling historians. It's also a pain for professors, whose students can buy essays over the Internet, rather than write them.
  • 3/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Bullies, video carnage, uncaring parents, access to guns. All have been pegged as a major cause - even the only cause - of violence among children and youth.
  • 2/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Sixty years ago this month - shortly after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor - an executive order was signed that imprisoned Japanese-Americans until World War II ended.
  • 2/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    New teachers often find themselves alone and overwhelmed, needing advice they either can't find or are afraid to seek.
  • 12/1/2001Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Educators at the University of Illinois believe that now, more than ever before, there is a critical need for Americans to have a deeper knowledge and understanding of international issues. And one way to accomplish that in Illinois is through the new International High School Program.
  • 12/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The past decade brought a rush of technology to education. Many teachers, however, still lack the know-how to use the new tools effectively.
  • 12/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Parents, caregivers and teachers of preschoolers in Illinois and beyond have a new online resource to help them educate children and prepare them for school.
  • 10/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Firefighters have to learn certain things hands-on - about hoses and pumps and working in smoke-filled buildings. But there's a lot to learn in the classroom, too, and Illinois firefighters now can study online through the University of Illinois. For cash-strapped fire departments and time-strapped firefighters - most of them volunteers - it means a new route to critical training.
  • 9/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    In the 1930s, many, if not most, African Americans in the South had no high school to attend, separate or otherwise. Only one in five was even enrolled. By the 1950s, fewer than one in five were receiving a diploma.
  • 8/1/2001Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Everybody knows that good teaching is an art, but can it be improved by science?
  • 6/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Intensive sensitivity training aimed at teachers has put a hole in the myth that father figures aren't there or don't care when it comes to kids enrolled in early education programs geared for low-income, at-risk households
  • 4/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Newsreels of the Great Depression typically depict scenes of extreme hardship - soup lines, dust storms, even suicides. Yet despite the financial crisis, most people went on with their daily lives, doing the routine, ordinary things, albeit often in scaled-back ways.
  • 2/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Private schools produce higher student achievement than their public counterparts, advocates for school vouchers argue. And fostering school choice and competition will raise educational standards overall, they say.
  • 2/1/2001Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    At some nursing homes across the country, bingo, craft-hour and popcorn-making parties are rapidly becoming pass´. Instead, today's residents are getting with the program and engaging in much hipper activities: surfing the Web and sending and receiving e-mail.
  • 11/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The business world has embraced e-commerce as a valuable tool for selling, but it has been slow to develop e-learning as a tool for training, despite some obvious benefits, a University of Illinois professor says.
  • 11/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    An autocratic president, a frustrated faculty, a miserly state legislature, a "comatose" major program (agriculture) and a rowdy student body with a penchant for secret societies and hazing -- these were the earmarks not of a current seat of learning, but of one 100 years ago.
  • 11/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    State learning standards are moving forward in Illinois schools, but very slowly, according to a recent University of Illinois report. One thing holding back implementation, ironically, is the test intended to measure how well the standards are being taught.
  • 9/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Most of the youngsters walking eagerly into kindergartens across America this fall expect school to be fun. Mom or Dad probably told them it would be.
  • 9/1/2000Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    When University of Illinois student Emily Kline arrived in India this summer to take part in an intensive, monthlong study-abroad program, culture shock set in almost instantly - despite the fact that Indian-American friends had briefed her on what to expect.
  • 8/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Previous research says the boys who bully most in grade school are often on the social fringe. In sixth grade, the first year of middle school, however, bullying apparently becomes popular, says Dorothy Espelage, a University of Illinois professor.
  • 8/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Gifted programs are providing valuable benefits to students, but are saddling them with undesired labels, according to many such former students in a recent University of Illinois study.
  • 7/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    A University of Illinois department that has specialized in teaching community college educators is bringing that expertise online.
  • 4/1/2000Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Go to college in Illinois. Collect $590,000. That's how much more a bachelor's degree at an Illinois college or university provides the average student over a lifetime compared with the earnings of a high school graduate, according to a study headed by economists at the University of Illinois.
  • 3/1/2000Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Unlearning what is already known is often more difficult than learning new information.
  • 2/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Are computers in the classroom good or bad for teaching? Will hooking schools to the Internet save or destroy education?
  • 2/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Are computers in the classroom good or bad for teaching? Will hooking schools to the Internet save or destroy education?