Health News

Health News

  • 8/27/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.
  • 8/24/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    One day soon, doctors may be able to determine how physically active you are simply by imaging your brain. Studies have shown that physically fit people tend to have larger brain volumes and more intact white matter than their less-fit peers. Now a new study reveals that older adults who regularly engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity have more variable brain activity at rest than those who don’t. This variability is associated with better cognitive performance, the researchers say.
  • 8/17/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    In the summer of 2012, Olga Kotelko, a 93-year-old Canadian track-and-field athlete with more than 30 world records in her age group, visited the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois and submitted to an in-depth analysis of her brain.
  • 8/12/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study reveals that 9- and 10-year-old children who are aerobically fit tend to have significantly thinner gray matter than their “lower-fit” peers. Thinning of the outermost layer of brain cells in the cerebrum is associated with better mathematics performance, researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE.
  • 8/3/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    It might not be possible to convince someone who believes that vaccines cause autism that they don’t. Telling skeptics that their belief is not scientifically supported often backfires and strengthens, rather than weakens, their anti-vaccine views. But researchers say they have found a way to overcome some of the most entrenched anti-vaccine attitudes: Remind the skeptics – with words and images – why vaccines exist.
  • 7/28/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests.
  • 7/22/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey.
  • 7/1/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home.
  • 7/1/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study looks at how leaf litter in water influences the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can transmit West Nile virus to humans, domestic animals, birds and other wildlife.
  • 6/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Pet dogs may be humans’ best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, said University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs, he said.
  • 6/10/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Forget those ageist stereotypes that senior citizens have little interest in sex and are befuddled by technology. Many older adults are going online to dish about the joys of sex and swap advice about keeping their mojos working well into their twilight years, a new study found.
  • 6/1/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    New compounds that specifically attack fungal infections without attacking human cells could transform treatment for such infections and point the way to targeted medicines that evade antibiotic resistance.
  • 5/19/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility – the ability to efficiently switch between tasks – and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility.
  • 5/4/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Infectious disease expert Mosoka P. Fallah, one of five “Ebola fighters” honored as a Person of the Year by Time in 2014, will be among the speakers at an upcoming symposium at the University of Illinois.
  • 4/28/2015Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Scientists have mapped the human genes triggered by the phytonutrients in soy, revealing the complex role the legume plays in both preventing and advancing breast cancer.
  • 4/15/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.
  • 2/26/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma.
  • 1/6/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study finds that smokers and the obese ring up substantially higher annual health care costs than their nonsmoking, non-obese peers. The added costs are highest among women, non-Hispanic whites and older adults, the study reports.
  • 11/21/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates.
  • 11/5/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Being accountable to another person and receiving social support may be vital in motivating some women to lose weight and keep it off, a new Illinois study says.
  • 10/23/2014A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. writer A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. by A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. published by A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.
    A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.
  • 10/21/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Writers, outdoor enthusiasts and leaf-peeping tourists have known for centuries that nature has restorative powers that reduce feelings of stress and promote a sense of tranquility. A study led by researchers at the University of Illinois is believed to be the first study to describe a dose-response curve derived from exposure to nature.
  • 9/26/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Will members of the “Facebook generation” learn to eat their broccoli and take more walks if the messages come from electronic games and peers in videos instead? Researchers at the University of Illinois explored that possibility in a recent study that included more than 200 middle-school youth who were at risk for diabetes or already had the disease. The study compared the effectiveness of interactive online media with that of a passive-learning website at helping young people improve their eating and exercise habits.
  • 5/6/2014Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    By simply carrying around their cellphones, patients who suffer from chronic disease could soon have an accurate health monitor that warns their doctors when their symptoms worsen.
  • 4/17/2014Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.
  • 4/3/2014Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Wearing a fitness tracker on your wrist or clipped to your belt is so 2013. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin and incorporate commercial, off-the-shelf chip-based electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring.
  • 3/17/2014Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Many characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders can be identified by the age of 2 and are predictive of which children will be diagnosed with these disorders when they’re older, a new study suggests.
  • 3/6/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    The infant mortality rate set forth as a national goal in the federal government’s Healthy People 2020 initiative is likely to be attained by only one demographic group – highly educated white mothers, the authors of a new study say.
  • 2/26/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers report that one tiny variation in the sequence of a gene may cause some people to be more impaired by traumatic brain injury (TBI) than others with comparable wounds.
  • 2/25/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad cholesterol” that doctors consider a sign of potential heart disease, is merely a marker of a diet lacking all of the essential amino acids, says University of Illinois comparative biosciences professor Fred Kummerow, 99, a longtime opponent of the medical establishment’s war on cholesterol.
  • 2/24/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Women with estrogen-responsive breast cancer who consume soy protein supplements containing isoflavones to alleviate the side effects of menopause may be accelerating progression of their cancer, changing it from a treatable subtype to a more aggressive, less treatable form of the disease, new research suggests.
  • 2/20/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor

    Older adults’ causal beliefs about their high blood pressure may vary according to where they live and other demographic variables, a new study finds. Elise A.G. Duwe, an M.D./Ph.D. candidate in the Medical Scholars Program, led the study. Daniel G. Morrow, a faculty member in the College of Education and the Beckman Institute, was a co-author.

  • 2/5/2014Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama referred to an August 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that showed a decline in the obesity rate among low-income pre-school children, saying, “Michelle’s Let’s Move! partnership with schools, businesses and local leaders has helped bring down childhood obesity rates for the first time in 30 years, and that's an achievement that will improve lives and reduce health care costs for decades to come.”
  • 9/9/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Youth who diet at early ages and report at least mild depression are at increased risk of developing eating disorders and engaging in unsafe weight-loss behaviors in young adulthood, new research by Janet Liechty and Meng-Jung Lee at the University of Illinois suggests.
  • 7/31/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Twenty years ago, at the age of 78, Fred A. Kummerow retired from the University of Illinois. That didn't mean his research days were behind him, however. Now in a wheelchair most of the time, Kummerow still maintains a laboratory on campus where he and his colleagues chip away at the basic assumptions that guide most research into the causes of heart disease. (Watch a video about his life and work.)
  • 7/16/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Thanks to a new $2 million investment, a drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is on the road to human clinical trials. The compound, known as PAC-1, has so far proven safe and has promising anti-cancer effects in cell culture, in mouse models of cancer and in pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphomas and osteosarcomas.
  • 7/10/2013Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A bout with cancer can be the catalyst for growth and healing in mother-daughter relationships, suggests a new study by a University of Illinois social work professor.
  • 7/2/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study indicates that aerobic exercise can lessen -- or worsen -- the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis, depending on the circumstances under which the exercise is undertaken.
  • 6/5/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers report that a single, 20-minute session of Hatha yoga significantly improved participants speed and accuracy on tests of working memory and inhibitory control, two measures of brain function associated with the ability to maintain focus and take in, retain and use new information. Participants performed significantly better immediately after the yoga practice than after moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise for the same amount of time.
  • 5/13/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When trouble approaches, what do you do? Run for the hills? Hide? Pretend it isnt there? Or do you focus on the promise of rain in those looming dark clouds? New research suggests that the way you regulate your emotions, in bad times and in good, can influence whether or how much you suffer from anxiety.
  • 4/10/2013Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    A new class of tiny, injectable LEDs is illuminating the deep mysteries of the brain.
  • 3/11/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Fitness DVDs are a multimillion-dollar business, and those targeting adults over the age of 55 are a major part of the market. With names like Boomers on the Move, Stronger Seniors and Ageless Yoga, the programs promise much, but few have ever been rigorously tested.
  • 2/27/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A 98-year-old researcher argues that, contrary to decades of clinical assumptions and advice to patients, dietary cholesterol is good for your heart unless that cholesterol is unnaturally oxidized (by frying foods in reused oil, eating lots of polyunsaturated fats, or smoking).
  • 2/18/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    Exercise doesnt only strengthen your heart and muscles it also beefs up your brain. Dozens of studies now show that aerobic exercise can increase the size of critical brain structures and improve cognition in children and older adults.
  • 1/14/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD.
  • 1/8/2013Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    Family members may play a unique and influential role in buffering Mexican youth against the negative effects of stress as they transition into adulthood, suggests a new study by an interdisciplinary group of researchers at universities in Mexico and the U.S.
  • 1/7/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers have discovered a new compound that restores the health of mice infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an otherwise dangerous bacterial infection. The new compound targets an enzyme not found in human cells but which is essential to bacterial survival.
  • 12/21/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Six weeks of weight training can significantly improve blood markers of cardiovascular health in young African-American men, researchers report in the Journal of Human Hypertension.
  • 12/18/2012Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Those considering how to maintain a healthy weight during holiday festivities, or looking ahead to New Years resolutions, may want to think twice before reaching for traditional staples like cookies or candy or the car keys.
  • 12/10/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Agricultural researchers and health educators are using cellphone technology to help those in the developing world address some of the most challenging issues they face. The initiative, Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO), delivers educational materials in the form of narrated, animated videos to a global audience.
  • 10/24/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which can cause pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and sepsis likes to share its antibiotic-defeating weaponry with its neighbors. Individual cells can pass resistance genes to one another through a process called horizontal gene transfer, or by transformation, the uptake of DNA from the environment. Now researchers report that they can interrupt the cascade of cellular events that allows S. pneumoniae to swap or suck up DNA
  • 9/10/2012Diana Yates writer Diana Yates by Diana Yates published by Diana Yates
    Researchers report that myxoma a pox virus that afflicts rabbits but not humans, dogs or any other vertebrates so far studied infects several different types of canine cancer cells in cell culture while sparing healthy cells. The study adds to the evidence that viruses or modified viruses will emerge as relatively benign cancer treatments to complement or replace standard cancer therapies.
  • 8/27/2012Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Photos of happy, smiling faces on patient education websites may engage readers, but they also may have a negative impact on older adults comprehension of vital health information, especially those elderly patients who are the least knowledgeable about their medical condition to begin with, suggests a new study.
  • 7/9/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study of aged female rats found that long-term treatment with estrogen and a synthetic progesterone known as MPA increased levels of a protein marker of synapses in the prefrontal cortex, a brain region known to suffer significant losses in aging.
  • 7/5/2012Mackenzie Dankle writer Mackenzie Dankle by Mackenzie Dankle published by Mackenzie Dankle
    Rainfall and temperature affect the abundance of two mosquito species linked to West Nile Virus in storm catch basins in suburban Chicago, two University of Illinois researchers report.
  • 7/2/2012Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    The news a cancer patient most fears is that the disease has spread and become much more difficult to treat. A new method to isolate and grow the most dangerous cancer cells could enable new research into how cancer spreads and, ultimately, how to fight it.
  • 7/2/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Young adult survivors of childhood cancer often have problems maintaining jobs and relationships, researchers have found. A new study of childhood brain tumor survivors by disability researcher David Strauser, a professor of community health at the University of Illinois, suggests that a battle with cancer during a critical developmental period in middle childhood may negatively affect career readiness and achievement as an adult by compromising childrens development of an effective work personality.
  • 5/29/2012Liz Ahlberg writer Liz Ahlberg by Liz Ahlberg published by Liz Ahlberg
    Doctors can now get a peek behind the eardrum to better diagnose and treat chronic ear infections, thanks to a new medical imaging device invented by University of Illinois researchers. The device could usher in a new suite of non-invasive, 3-D diagnostic imaging tools for primary-care physicians.
  • 5/2/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    People with mild or moderate disabilities who are creative, intellectually curious and attentive to their feelings those who score higher on the personality trait openness may be significantly more likely to maintain employment, suggests a new study co-written by David Strauser, a professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois.
  • 4/23/2012Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Real-time, 3-D microscopic tissue imaging could be a revolution for medical fields such as cancer diagnosis, minimally invasive surgery and ophthalmology. University of Illinois researchers have developed a technique to computationally correct for aberrations in optical tomography, bringing the future of medical imaging into focus.
  • 3/13/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Mothers participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC, are more likely to discontinue breastfeeding their infants before 6 months of age than non-WIC mothers, especially if they rely upon relatives to provide child care, according to a new study by Juhee Kim, a professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois.
  • 3/8/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Babies who are breastfed exclusively for their first six months of life may be less likely to become picky eaters as preschoolers, according to a recent study of 129 mothers and their children.
  • 2/27/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A chemically altered osteoporosis drug may be useful in fighting malaria, researchers report in a new study. Unlike similar compounds tested against many other parasitic protozoa, the drug readily crosses into the red blood cells of malaria-infected mice and kills the malaria parasite. The drug works at very low concentrations with no observed toxicity to the mouse.
  • 2/21/2012Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Hispanics living in the Midwest have the highest obesity rates among Latinos in the U.S., and in Illinois, the percentage of obese Latino children 6-11 years of age has doubled since 2001, standing now at 24 percent. However, an intervention program developed by a researcher at the University of Illinois shows promise in helping Latino parents and their children develop healthy eating and exercise habits that prevent or combat obesity.
  • 2/6/2012Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois researchers determined that an adult stem cell present in muscle is responsive to exercise, a discovery that may provide a link between exercise and muscle health. The findings could lead to new therapeutic techniques using these cells to rehabilitate injured muscle and prevent or restore muscle loss with age.
  • 9/12/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Living with a chronic disease, or being a caretaker for a loved one in failing health, can be frustrating as well as emotionally and physically draining.Live Well Be Well, a workshop series offered by the UI Wellness Center, offers people with chronic health problems and people who care for them support and strategies for fulfilling their physical potential and deriving more pleasure from life.
  • 8/16/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Sticking with an exercise routine means being able to overcome the obstacles that invariably arise. A key to success is having the confidence that you can do it, researchers report. A new study explores how some cognitive strategies and abilities influence this situation-specific self-confidence, a quality the researchers call self-efficacy.
  • 8/3/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Firefighting causes stiff arteries and cardiac fatigue, conditions also found in weightlifters and endurance athletes, according to two recent studies by researchers at the Illinois Fire Service Institute, located at the University of Illinois.
  • 6/28/2011Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor
    Reality television series such as Intervention that claim to provide unflinching portraits of addiction and treatment dont accurately depict either one, and, at worst, the shows focus on the most extreme cases may deter some viewers from seeking help, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 6/21/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study offers a detailed look at the status of Lyme disease in Central Illinois and suggests that deer ticks and the Lyme disease bacteria they host are more adaptable to new habitats than previously appreciated.
  • 6/20/2011Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor
    Eating meals with family may be the best recipe for promoting healthy eating behaviors and body weights in children and adolescents, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 5/26/2011Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    After breast cancer surgery, increased self-consciousness and perceptions of disfigurement prompt some women to shy away from involvement in group fitness and recreational activities during a time when they might benefit the most physically and emotionally.
  • 4/25/2011Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor
    Researchers have long known that children with disabilities are at increased risk of being abused by their caregivers. But a groundbreaking new study by Jesse Helton, a faculty member in the Children and Family Research Center in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois, indicates that the risk and degree of physical abuse varies according to the childs type and level of disability and those at greatest risk of maltreatment may be those with average functioning or only mild impairments.
  • 3/15/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    One of the tests used in diagnosing prostate cancer is so stigmatized within Latino culture that men may be risking their lives to avoid it, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 10/21/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new research center based at the University of Illinois will investigate whether regular exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates chemicals widely used in plastics and other consumer products can alter infant and adolescent development, cognition or behavior.
  • 9/7/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    An ongoing research initiative into the health effects of botanical estrogens will get an $8 million boost from the National Institutes of Health. The Botanical Research Center, based at the University of Illinois, will draw on the expertise of a multidisciplinary team of researchers to address the many unknowns associated with use of botanical estrogens.
  • 8/26/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A group of professional couch potatoes, as one researcher described them, has proven that even moderate exercise in this case walking at ones own pace for 40 minutes three times a week can enhance the connectivity of important brain circuits, combat declines in brain function associated with aging and increase performance on cognitive tasks.
  • 3/24/2010
    Arrhythmic hearts soon may beat in time again, with minimal surgical invasion, thanks to flexible electronics technology developed by a team of University of Illinois researchers, in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Northwestern University. These biocompatible silicon devices could mark the beginning of a new wave of surgical electronics.
  • 3/12/2010Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    In a new study, Tom ORourke, a professor emeritus of community health at the University of Illinois, examined 25 variables in four categories to see how state policies might affect residents health.
  • 1/6/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers report that Helicobacter pylori, the only bacterium known to survive in the harsh environment of the human stomach, directly activates an enzyme in host cells that has been associated with several types of cancer, including gastric cancer.
  • 12/15/2009Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Physical activity is known to reduce depression and fatigue in people struggling with chronic illness. A new study indicates that this effect may stem from an individuals sense of mastery over or belief in his or her ability to achieve certain physical goals.
  • 10/21/2009Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Rats exposed to high doses of amphetamines at an age that corresponds to the later years of human adolescence display significant memory deficits as adults long after the exposure ends, researchers report.
  • 10/19/2009Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Taiji master Yang Yang, an adjunct professor of kinesiology at the University of Illinois, is featured in a new, permanent exhibit that opened Oct. 8 at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.
  • 9/30/2009Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Social marketing can sell kids on getting outside and getting active, according to Marian Huhman (WHO-mun), a professor of communication at Illinois. Her findings are based on recently published results on a five-year national campaign aimed at tweens aged 9 to 13 years old.
  • 8/6/2009Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Cancer drugs must be effective. But they must also target cancer cells and not healthy cells. And - ideally- they'll come with an easy antidote. University of Illinois researchers report that they have developed a cancer drug delivery system that achieves all of the above.
  • 7/28/2009Melissa Mitchell writer Melissa Mitchell by Melissa Mitchell published by Melissa Mitchell
    The Latino/a population in the United States is expected to triple by 2050, according to projections from the U.S. Census Bureau. And along with that growth, says University of Illinois professor Lydia Buki, will come a rise in the number of individuals from that population who are diagnosed with cancer.
  • 5/27/2009Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor writer Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor by Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor published by Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor
    Financial contracts to care for sick or aging relatives – nearly unthinkable just a decade ago – are drawing new interest as everyday Americans wrestle with the time and expense of providing long-term health care, a University of Illinois legal expert says.
  • 12/5/2008Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Those diagnosed with early stage dementia can slow their physical, mental and psychological decline by taking part in therapeutic programs that combine counseling, support groups, Taiji and qigong, researchers report. Some of the benefits of this approach are comparable to those achieved with anti-dementia medications.
  • 12/4/2008Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    With up to half of a person’s body mass consisting of skeletal muscle, chronic inflammation of those muscles – which include those found in the limbs – can result in significant physical impairment. According to an Illinois kinesiology and community health professor, past research has demonstrated that the antioxidant properties of Vitamin E may be associated with reduced expression of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines, in vitro, in various types of cells. Cytokines are regulatory proteins that function as intercellular communicators that assist the immune system in generating a response.
  • 9/30/2008Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    With childhood obesity expanding to epidemic proportions in the United States, educators, researchers and health practitioners are actively seeking to identify effective means of addressing this public-health crisis.
  • 9/23/2008Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Women taking aromatase inhibitors to treat breast cancer or prevent its recurrence should think twice before also taking a soy-based dietary supplement, researchers report.
  • 9/4/2008Kaushik Ragunathan, News Bureau intern writer Kaushik Ragunathan, News Bureau intern by Kaushik Ragunathan, News Bureau intern published by Kaushik Ragunathan, News Bureau intern
    A series of experiments conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois suggest that society’s emphasis on action over inaction may lead to unforeseen consequences.
  • 9/4/2008Matthew Freeman writer Matthew Freeman by Matthew Freeman published by Matthew Freeman
    A recent study by University of Illinois professor of psychology Dolores Albarracn and her colleagues at the University of Florida and the Alachua County Health Department in Florida found a method to increase enrollment among high-risk individuals in HIV prevention programs.
  • 8/28/2008Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    A new study co-written by a University of Illinois professor has confirmed what parks and recreation professionals have long suspected: Nationwide, their agencies are serving as effective partners with community health-care providers in promoting healthy, active lifestyles among residents.
  • 8/1/2008Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois researchers report this week that chronic exposure to estradiol, the main estrogen in the body, diminishes some cognitive functions. Rats exposed to a steady dose of estradiol were impaired on tasks involving working memory and response inhibition, the researchers found.
  • 7/11/2008Melissa Mitchell writer Melissa Mitchell by Melissa Mitchell published by Melissa Mitchell
    With more new mothers in the workplace than ever before, there has been a corresponding increase in the number of child-care facilities in the United States. At the same time, data from a variety of sources point to a growing prevalence of overweight infants and toddlers. Is there a connection?
  • 11/28/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    In recent years, researchers at the University of Illinois have uncovered a host of reasons for people to remain physically active as they age, ranging from better brain function to improved immune responses.
  • 11/16/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    If Americans spent the same amount of money on health care as counterparts in Canada and a number of other countries, the difference between what they spend now and what they would save annually would be enough to pay for two plasma TVs or three Big Macs a day.
  • 9/27/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    As they root for the home team from their bleacher seats this fall, high school gridiron fans in the small Illinois town of Tolono don't necessarily see anything out of the ordinary down on the field.
  • 8/22/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Restless legs syndrome is a common problem in children 8 years of age and older in the United States and the United Kingdom, according to a new report from an international team of researchers.
  • 8/13/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Move on mosquitoes. Step aside sweat bees. Before long, another unwelcome, but predictable, pest will return: the dreaded, oft-spotted flu bug.
  • 8/7/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Is it me, or are you a less than ideal partner? For psychologists studying how people manage romantic relationships, that's not an easy question to answer. What if one of the partners is deeply afraid of intimacy? Could she be acting in ways that undermine the relationship? Or is her partner contributing to the problem?
  • 7/5/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Although a number of studies have suggested that regular exercise reduces inflammation - a condition that is predictive of cardiovascular and other diseases, such as diabetes - it's still not clear whether there is a definitive link. And if such a link exists, the nature of the relationship is by no means fully understood.
  • 6/14/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    In a study appearing this month in the Journal of Immunology, researchers at the University of Illinois describe how an impaired anti-inflammatory response plays a role in the pathology of type 2 diabetes.
  • 5/29/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    All anxiety is not created equal, and a research team at the University of Illinois now has the data to prove it. The team has found the most compelling evidence yet of differing patterns of brain activity associated with each of two types of anxiety: anxious apprehension (verbal rumination, worry) and anxious arousal (intense fear, panic, or both).
  • 5/25/2007Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor
    It's time for Congress to re-examine the ban on experimental or alternative medicine that is not approved by federal regulators, especially drugs and devices aimed at seniors who suffer from life-threatening diseases, a legal scholar says.
  • 5/1/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers in Illinois and Singapore have found that the aging brain reflects cultural differences in the way that it processes visual information. This study appears this month in the journal Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience. This paper and another published by the same group in 2006 are the first to demonstrate that culture can alter the brain's perceptive mechanisms.
  • 4/24/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Many women in the menopausal transition experience hot flashes: unpredictable, sometimes disruptive, periods of intense heat in the upper torso, neck and face. Although generations of physicians have prescribed hormones to reduce these symptoms, very little research has focused on the underlying causes of hot flashes.
  • 4/23/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The culture of a school can dampen - or exacerbate - the violent or disruptive tendencies of aggressive young teens, new research indicates. A large-scale study from the University of Illinois found that while personal traits and peer interactions have the most direct effect on the aggressive behavior of middle school students, the school environment also influences student aggression.
  • 3/12/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers at the University of Illinois have found that adolescence is a time of remodeling in the prefrontal cortex, a brain structure dedicated to higher functions such as planning and social behaviors.
  • 2/15/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Few situations place people at greater risk for the debilitating after-effects of traumatic brain injury than combat.
  • 1/24/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Estrogen is known to enhance the growth and migration of breast cancer cells. Now researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that estrogen also can shield breast cancer cells from immune cells.
  • 12/18/2006Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    As an expanding body of work continues to confirm links between exercise and improved brain function in older adults, a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam suggests similar improvements among younger populations as well.
  • 12/1/2006Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    A new study that tracked the health of thousands of female textile workers in China indicates that women who have had an abortion do not have an increased risk of developing cancer.
  • 11/20/2006Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    The wait for an anti-aging treatment is over, according to cognitive neuroscientists and kinesiologists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While not as effortless as popping a pill, the treatment - in the form of moderate exercise - may be a simple and effective way to reverse age-related brain deterioration.
  • 7/17/2006James E. Kloeppel, Science Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Science Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Science Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Science Editor
    Adults who are highly anxious can perceive changes in facial expressions more quickly than adults who are less anxious, a new study shows. By jumping to emotional conclusions, however, highly anxious adults may make more errors in judgment and perpetuate a cycle of conflict and misunderstanding in their relationships.
  • 6/28/2006Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    New work by researchers at the University of Illinois lends strength to previous research documenting the health benefits of Qigong and Taiji among older adults who practice these ancient Chinese martial-arts forms.
  • 6/7/2006Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Research by scientists based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may lead to the development of a new breed of "multimodal" contrast agents that could work within a host of medical imaging platforms - from ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) to magnetic resonance imaging and molecular imaging.
  • 4/10/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A courtroom jury views a computer animation of a vehicle accident or heinous crime. Does it help bring a conviction or acquittal? With no clear standards for animations that re-create incidents, the verdict is still out, and, for now, it may depend on which side created the simulation, researchers say.
  • 2/16/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Too old to learn new skills? By golly, think again. New research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign shows that training re-ignites key areas of the brain, offsetting some age-related declines and boosting performance.
  • 1/24/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Women pondering hormone-replacement therapy also should consider regular exercise. A new study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suggests that being physically fit offsets cognitive declines attributed to long-term therapy.
  • 1/4/2006Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Throughout the land, glossy new calendars adorn kitchen walls and office desktops. And for many people, the new year prompts thoughts of an old tradition: making - and, in many cases, ultimately breaking - New Year's resolutions.
  • 12/19/2005Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Women who were victims of childhood sexual abuse have long been assumed to be at a higher risk for eating disorders. The results of research, however, have been mixed, with some studies showing a link and others none.
  • 11/10/2005Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Exercise is a lot like spinach ... everybody knows it's good for you; yet many people still avoid it, forgoing its potential health benefits.
  • 10/26/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    When it comes to focusing on a task amid distractions, some folks more than 60 years old are as mentally sharp as 22-year-olds. Others struggle. Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have shed some light on why that is.
  • 10/18/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Keep pet cats inside, stop feeding strays, cook meat sufficiently and reconsider the way the veterinary profession and public health agencies think - and teach - about the zoonotic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii.
  • 10/11/2005Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    Aging may intensify and prolong feeling run down when common infections like the flu occur, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/10/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    With a four-year, $450,000 grant from the James S. McDonnell Foundation, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are working to develop an immunotherapy that would be a safe alternative to surgery for brain cancers.
  • 10/6/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Dietary supplements containing vanadium are used by body builders to help beef up muscles and by some diabetic people to control blood sugar. New research now suggests the naturally occurring but easily toxic element may help prepare the body to recover speedily from infections from gram-negative organisms such as E. coli.
  • 7/18/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    When faced with a challenging situation, a bicultural person may decide how to respond based on the cultural mindset that is active at the time, researchers have concluded.
  • 7/11/2005Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    Dr. Hugo C. Avalos, a small-town physician who has been retired for nearly four years, is helping the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign tackle a series of challenges facing the medical profession.
  • 4/14/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    According to conventional wisdom, babies don't begin to develop sophisticated psychological reasoning about people until they are about 4 years old. A study of 15-month-olds at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign proves otherwise.
  • 3/14/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Your child has a homework assignment, doesn't understand it and is acting helpless. So what's a parent to do? Help, but stay loving and make the process fun, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 1/24/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Have regrets? Don't push them away. Harness them and move on as a smarter person, says Neal Roese, a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 11/12/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Driving with one hand on the wheel and another on a cell phone has led to legal restrictions and proposals to require drivers to use hands-free phones.
  • 11/12/2004Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor
    Health educators and dietitians ought to be more precise the next time they advise Americans that "vegetables and fruit are good for you," according to a study by a nutritional expert at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/18/2004Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    The health benefits of exercise - across the lifespan - have been well documented. More recently, scientists have begun to demonstrate that exercise also may improve cognitive functioning in older adults.
  • 8/31/2004Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    A well known anti-cancer agent in certain vegetables has just had its reputation enhanced. The compound, in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been found to be effective in disrupting late stages of cell growth in breast cancer.
  • 8/27/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Kids with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) should spend some quality after-school hours and weekend time outdoors enjoying nature, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 8/27/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Does estrogen help cognition? Many women ponder that question as a quality-of-life issue while deciding on estrogen therapy since it has been linked to potential disease complications. Now, a new study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suggests that the stress of any given task at least partially determines if hormones will help the mind.
  • 7/30/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Isolated soy protein added to the diets of 14 men, all military veterans under treatment for advanced stages of type 2 diabetes, significantly lowered unwanted proteins in their urine and slightly raised desired HDL cholesterol levels in their blood, researchers say.
  • 7/27/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    After a series of studies in the laboratory of Dr. Gregory Freund, a clearer picture is emerging: A disruption of signaling proteins in the immune system may be responsible for the inflammation that makes someone with type 2 diabetes feel sick and increases the risk of serious complications.
  • 7/27/2004Molly McElroy, News Bureau writer Molly McElroy, News Bureau by Molly McElroy, News Bureau published by Molly McElroy, News Bureau
    Feeling sick can be "all in the head" for people with inflammatory disorders or for those receiving immunotherapy, say Robert Dantzer and Keith Kelley, professors in the department of animal sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 7/26/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Adolescents who think little of themselves tend to shy away from interactions with peers. This uncertainty and withdrawal then draws negative feedback from other students, prompting even more withdrawal and leaving them with few chances to have close friends and as targets for teasing or bullying.
  • 6/8/2004Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Oral cancer probably hasn't been high on the average pot smoker's list of concerns - despite the fact that marijuana smoke contains known carcinogens. It may be even less of a concern now in light of new research that found no link between marijuana use and risk of developing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).
  • 2/16/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Aging adults who give up a sedentary lifestyle and replace it with a cardiovascular fitness regimen as simple as brisk walks reap greater focus and reduced decision-making conflict as they perform a variety of tasks, scientists say.
  • 2/2/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The nationwide rise in induced labor and Caesarean deliveries could be eased by an experimental dual drug approach that not only safely jump-starts labor but also remodels the cervix to allow for speedy natural delivery, scientists report.
  • 11/4/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    New research suggests that lycopene - a carotenoid in tomatoes that has been linked to a lowered risk of prostate cancer - does not act alone. Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Ohio State University say that lycopene's punch is stronger in combination with other phytochemicals in the fruit.
  • 8/1/2003Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    As they age, people tend to become more prone to slipping, tripping and falling. And the results of such missteps and tumbles sometimes can be catastrophic.
  • 7/1/2003Mark Reutter, Business and Law Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business and Law Editor by Mark Reutter, Business and Law Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business and Law Editor
    Perhaps men are from Mars and women from Venus, at least in the eating department. When it comes to foods that bring them psychological comfort, men like hearty meals, while women look for snacks that require little or no preparation, though they may cause pangs of guilt.
  • 7/1/2003Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Diners and dieters who look only at a target food and disregard other factors in meal selection can hinder a healthy diet, a food specialist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.
  • 7/1/2003Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    An increasing number of doctors and other health experts have been encouraging older adults to rise from their recliners and go for a walk, a bike ride, a swim, or engage in just about any other form of physical activity as a defense against the potentially harmful health consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.
  • 6/2/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Adding fiber to the diet for bowel health is standard advice for adults. Such wisdom also may benefit babies, say researchers who are testing the impact of fiber added to milk-replacement formulas of newborn piglets.
  • 3/1/2003Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Because physical education generally has not been considered a "core" subject by educators and policymakers, national and state-based school reform efforts launched within the past decade often have left P.E. sitting on the bench. But when lawmakers in South Carolina began considering legislation to mandate the establishment of state education standards, physical education professionals there stepped up to the plate to ensure their place at the reform table.
  • 2/6/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    As nutrition experts debate the ideal combination of protein, carbohydrates and fat that people should eat, new research explains for the first time how and why a moderately high protein diet may be the best for losing weight.
  • 2/1/2003Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    With more and more households reporting access to home computers and Internet connections, activities such as purchasing products, tracing family histories and planning vacations online have become commonplace. Janet Reis hopes one segment of the public - prostate cancer patients and their caregivers - will add another activity to that list: building skills to more effectively manage the disease.
  • 1/27/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Three key areas of the brain adversely affected by aging show the greatest benefit when a person stays physically fit. The proof, scientists say, is visible in the brain scans of 55 volunteers over age 55.
  • 12/1/2002Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Making family meals more healthy requires more than watching the Cooking Channel, according to a marketing researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 11/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    Recent reports citing childhood obesity as one of the nation's latest health epidemics are generating calls for action by physical education experts, among them, Kim Graber, a kinesiology professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/22/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Work and home: Two worlds that most parents juggle daily. How to balance the two so the pressure of one doesn't overwhelm the other is the focus of a five-part program under development by University of Illinois Extension.
  • 10/17/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Broccoli packs a healthy punch, but not necessarily every time you eat it, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • 9/1/2002Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Exercise not only improves your health, it makes you feel good. It's a message constantly reinforced through research, advertisements and the news media.
  • 8/7/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Complex physical learning may help children overcome some mental disabilities that result from prenatal alcohol consumption by their mothers, say researchers whose experiments led to increased wiring in the brains of young rats.
  • 8/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The world AIDS conference last month offered a large dose of grim news about the disease and its precursor, HIV.
  • 7/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Nearly a decade after the Clinton administration's unsuccessful efforts to reform the nation's health-care system, that system is still ailing - and failing many Americans.
  • 6/26/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    At-risk inner-city girls who see nature through the windows of their homes may have a better chance for success than those girls whose views are not as green, say scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 6/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    The senior citizen who swims, jogs, plays tennis or participates in some type of regular exercise program is likely to be better prepared to respond to situations requiring quick thinking than a peer who logs too much time in the recliner.
  • 5/15/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Deciding on hormone-replacement therapy - weighing the far-reaching benefits and risks - can give a woman a headache. Now researchers say estrogen may dictate what problem-solving strategies the brain uses to solve problems.
  • 5/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    It's no secret that women begin to lose bone mass and density as they exit their childbearing years, but other changes in body composition associated with menopause may trigger additional health problems, says University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign kinesiology professor Ellen Evans.
  • 4/8/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Four infant vaccines. One injection. How much will the industry charge? How much is a parent willing to pay? How much will government and insurance cover? Such issues are becoming real, says a University of Illinois researcher who has developed a mathematically based analysis tool to help pinpoint acceptable pricing.
  • 4/8/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Two new University of Illinois studies are sweet news to honey lovers. One shows that honey's antioxidant qualities preserve meat without compromising taste. A just-published study says that honey - at least based on work done on human blood in the lab - slows the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a process that leads to atherosclerotic plaque deposition.
  • 3/21/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Sunlight and PCB exposure can hit you where you least expect it. The combination enhances the development of non-melanoma skin cancer on parts of the body not directly exposed to the sun, according to a University of Illinois study.
  • 12/1/2001Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    When trying to engage and interact with children with severe, multiple disabilities, therapists have found that nothing gets their patients' attention like a visit with Fido, Fluffy or Flicka.
  • 11/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    A new approach to improving the detection and removal of tumors has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois.
  • 11/1/2001Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Since the Sept. 11 attack on the World Trade Center, images of exhausted firefighters have been imprinted on the national psyche, increasing public awareness of the arduous nature of rescue workers' jobs.
  • 11/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The increasingly consumed isoflavone genistein - a plant estrogen linked to the health benefits of soy - has been shown in a series of University of Illinois studies to stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent human breast-cancer cells implanted into laboratory mice.
  • 11/1/2001Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Each year, an estimated 500,000-600,000 people suffer strokes in the United States. Afterward, about 40 percent of them experience dysphagia - difficulty swallowing - says Adrienne Perlman, a professor of speech and hearing science at the University of Illinois.
  • 9/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Ending workplace discrimination against people with disabilities was a key aim of the Americans with Disabilities Act passed in 1990.
  • 9/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Sun-worshippers beware: Most sunscreen products offer inadequate protection against the harmful effects of the sun's ultraviolet radiation.
  • 9/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Are Asian Americans troubled by social anxieties and in need of therapy more than their white counterparts? University of Illinois researchers believe that such a conclusion may seem clear based on standard assessment techniques, but that view may actually be out of focus.
  • 8/27/2001Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    The University of Illinois, in conjunction with the American College of Sports Medicine, has received a grant of $568,767 from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for a project aimed at making older Americans more active and healthy.
  • 7/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Food-borne pathogens long considered rare on North American plates are an emerging problem, and restaurant and home chefs should be more diligent about washing their fresh produce, University of Illinois food scientists say. Such is the message gleaned from follow-up work on a Shigella-infected bean salad that sickened customers at a Chicago restaurant in 1999.
  • 7/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Men should already know that sex with multiple partners, especially unprotected sex, can increase their risk of contracting HIV and various venereal diseases.
  • 6/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Next time an older person says that thinking is exhausting, believe it. Concentration, researchers say, drains glucose from a key part of the brains of young and old rats, but dramatically more from older brains, which also take longer to recover.
  • 6/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    PCB-laden fish from Lake Michigan affect not only young children but also adults over age 49, researchers say. Many of the former big eaters of sport-caught fish now have high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in their blood and problems with learning and memory.
  • 4/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    New research suggests a diet higher in protein and lower in carbohydrates than currently recommended may help people maintain desirable body weight and overall health.
  • 4/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    New research suggests a diet higher in protein and lower in carbohydrates than currently recommended may help people maintain desirable body weight and overall health.
  • 4/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The campus that led the way 50 years ago in making college accessible to people with disabilities now promises to play a lead role in disability-related research.
  • 2/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Flee, freeze or fight. A response to a threat is based on experience and memory. Now scientists have discovered that an area of the brain, the amygdala, which was thought to store painful and emotion-related memories, also initiates memory storage in other brain regions.
  • 2/1/2001Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    Valentine's Day is fast approaching, a time for romance and sex -- and more than a few lies.
  • 2/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Legumes often fall far below popular grains and moisture-laden fruits and vegetables on the list of foods Americans eat to try to meet the American Dietetic Association-recommended 25 to 35 grams of dietary fiber per day.
  • 12/20/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    'Tis the season for holiday parties, and drinkers are urged to "know when to say when" before getting behind the wheel
  • 12/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The new year awaits, but many senior citizens, along with their younger counterparts, have given up on any resolution to start an exercise program. Or maybe they gave up years ago, intimidated by what they thought was required, and now assume it's too late.
  • 12/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The new year awaits, but many senior citizens, along with their younger counterparts, have given up on any resolution to start an exercise program. Or maybe they gave up years ago, intimidated by what they thought was required, and now assume it's too late.
  • 12/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    People with total cholesterol levels exceeding 240 could benefit substantially by eating 25 to 50 grams of soy protein daily, according to a scientific advisory directed to health-care professionals across the United States.
  • 12/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    People with total cholesterol levels exceeding 240 could benefit substantially by eating 25 to 50 grams of soy protein daily, according to a scientific advisory directed to health-care professionals across the United States.
  • 12/1/2000Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    You not only are what you eat, you also are what you slurp, at least according to Brian Wansink, who has done a study that links soup choices to personality types.
  • 11/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    They are age-old questions: Who am I? Who do I want to be? A new study suggests that both questions -- one involving a person's disposition and the other encompassing a person's goals -- should be considered when counseling young people on career choices.
  • 9/1/2000Mark Reutter, Business Editor writer Mark Reutter, Business Editor by Mark Reutter, Business Editor published by Mark Reutter, Business Editor
    Why do people eat what they eat? In addition to a well-documented craving for sweet foods and salty foods, people eat foods that trigger happy past associations. Brian Wansink classifies such foods as comfort foods.
  • 8/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Reaction time can be crucial, and children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can be out of step.
  • 6/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A new study finds that for people living with AIDS or HIV, the conventional wisdom about "more information being better than less," doesn't always apply.
  • 5/19/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The University of Illinois will be the site of a new national Disability Research Institute supported by the U.S. Social Security Administration.
  • 5/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Why do we do the things we do? Is our daily behavior essentially a reaction to outside occurrences? Might our actions instead be primarily driven by what's inside us? Or maybe, does what we do emerge from a combination of both internal and external factors?
  • 5/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Why do we do the things we do? Is our daily behavior essentially a reaction to outside occurrences? Might our actions instead be primarily driven by what's inside us? Or maybe, does what we do emerge from a combination of both internal and external factors?
  • 4/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Improving education about available mental health services for Asian Americans can break down cultural barriers that may contribute to delayed treatment for serious disorders such as schizophrenia and manic depression, a University of Illinois researcher says.
  • 4/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    For people with hypernasal speech, many of them with repaired cleft palates, there have been few remedies other than surgery, and the surgery comes with risks.
  • 4/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    For people with hypernasal speech, many of them with repaired cleft palates, there have been few remedies other than surgery, and the surgery comes with risks.
  • 3/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Cholesterol levels may reflect a person's diet, but they say little about cardiac health, researchers say. In a new study, cholesterol levels were found to be under so-called danger levels for 750 men and women who were diagnosed with serious blockage of coronary arteries and had bypass surgery after complaining of chest pains and undergoing cardiac catheterization.