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Health News

  • 2/25/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad cholesterol” that doctors consider a sign of potential heart disease, is merely a marker of a diet lacking all of the essential amino acids, says University of Illinois comparative biosciences professor Fred Kummerow, 99, a longtime opponent of the medical establishment’s war on cholesterol.
  • 2/24/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Women with estrogen-responsive breast cancer who consume soy protein supplements containing isoflavones to alleviate the side effects of menopause may be accelerating progression of their cancer, changing it from a treatable subtype to a more aggressive, less treatable form of the disease, new research suggests.
  • 2/20/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor

    Older adults’ causal beliefs about their high blood pressure may vary according to where they live and other demographic variables, a new study finds. Elise A.G. Duwe, an M.D./Ph.D. candidate in the Medical Scholars Program, led the study. Daniel G. Morrow, a faculty member in the College of Education and the Beckman Institute, was a co-author.

  • 2/5/2014Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama referred to an August 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that showed a decline in the obesity rate among low-income pre-school children, saying, “Michelle’s Let’s Move! partnership with schools, businesses and local leaders has helped bring down childhood obesity rates for the first time in 30 years, and that's an achievement that will improve lives and reduce health care costs for decades to come.”
  • 9/9/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Youth who diet at early ages and report at least mild depression are at increased risk of developing eating disorders and engaging in unsafe weight-loss behaviors in young adulthood, new research by Janet Liechty and Meng-Jung Lee at the University of Illinois suggests.