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Engineering News

Engineering News

  • 5/21/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois researchers have developed heat-triggered self-destructing electronic devices, a step toward greatly reducing electronic waste and boosting sustainability in device manufacturing. They also developed a radio-controlled trigger that could remotely activate self-destruction on demand.
  • 5/6/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Technology in common household humidifiers could enable the next wave of high-tech medical imaging and targeted medicine, thanks to a new method for making tiny silicone microspheres developed by chemists at the University of Illinois.
  • 4/20/2015Austin Keating, News Bureau intern writer Austin Keating, News Bureau intern by Austin Keating, News Bureau intern published by Austin Keating, News Bureau intern
    A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by University of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology.
  • 4/2/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Giving new meaning to the term “sonic boom,” University of Illinois chemists have used sound to trigger microscopic explosions.
  • 3/24/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    One infrared scan can give pathologists a window into the structures and molecules inside tissues and cells, enabling fast and broad diagnostic assessments, thanks to an imaging technique developed by University of Illinois researchers and clinical partners.