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Humanities News

  • 8/21/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A land use plan adopted for the Sacramento, California, region aimed to get local governments to plan together for development in a way that discouraged sprawl.
  • 8/19/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Krannert Art Museum will exhibit a wide variety of works from its permanent collection – many of which have not been displayed publicly in a long time – as the museum opens its new season Aug. 27.
  • 8/13/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Robert Olshansky, a University of Illinois professor, head of the department of urban and regional planning and an expert in post-disaster recovery, closely followed the rebuilding efforts in New Orleans in the first few years following the hurricane.
  • 7/10/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Think of a scientist at work, and you might picture someone at a lab bench, doing a physical experiment involving beakers or petri dishes and recording his or her findings, which will eventually form the basis for a scientific paper.
  • 7/1/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The dance piece choreographed by Kemal Nance, a lecturer in the University of Illinois Department of Dance, imagines a mythical scenario in which trees are dancing from communal joy. The work – “SHADE! (The Secret Dance of Trees)” – also serves as a metaphor of African-American culture.
  • 6/15/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Mention traditional marriage and family and it’s easy to think you’re talking about age-old customs. Those “traditional” ideals and practices, however, are more likely a product of the last two centuries, says a University of Illinois history professor.
  • 6/8/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Japan entered a period of colonial expansion in the late 19th century, starting with its annexation of Taiwan in 1895. Within just a few years of this colonial conquest, an anti-imperialism movement began in Japan. One of the key figures in the movement was Kōtoku Shūsui, a journalist and anarchist who wrote a book opposing imperialism and who was executed by the Japanese government in 1911.
  • 5/6/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Krannert Art Museum and the School of Art and Design will display the work of graduating seniors in art and design. The School of Art and Design Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition opens May 9, with a public reception from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibition will be on display in the East and Gelvin Noel galleries through May 17.
  • 5/4/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Students of color at the University of Illinois say they hear racist remarks, are subjected to stereotypes, feel excluded in group projects or receive other negative messages based on race, according to a new report on race relations.
  • 5/4/2015Mike Helenthal, News Editor writer Mike Helenthal, News Editor by Mike Helenthal, News Editor published by Mike Helenthal, News Editor
    The effort to save a group of historic campus murals received a boost last week after officials agreed to help fund the project.
  • 4/20/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The spectrum of music at ELLNORA: The Guitar Festival this fall will range from traditional Mexican guitar to southern rock, and from jazz to classical guitar. And the diversity is not just in the style of music, but the instruments as well. The guitar festival also features banjo, sarod, Hawaiian slack key guitar and pipa, a four-stringed Chinese lute.
  • 4/16/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The longtime director of bands at Ithaca College will lead the University of Illinois concert and athletic bands, including the Marching Illini, beginning in August.
  • 4/13/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Seven faculty members and seven graduate students are recipients of Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities fellowships for the 2015-16 academic year. The fellowships support research and writing on topics chosen by the fellowship recipients.
  • 4/8/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    An ancient human skull and a jawbone found a few meters apart in a cave in northern Laos add to the evidence that early modern humans were physically quite diverse, researchers report in PLOS ONE.
  • 4/2/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Americans see a lot of Abraham Lincoln – on our money, in advertising, in photos and films. It’s easy to think we know the guy. But what we see in Lincoln may say more about us and our times than about him, said University of Illinois communication professor Cara Finnegan.
  • 4/1/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Krannert Art Museum will soon display a different kind of artwork. Its annual Petals & Paintings exhibition takes place April 11-12, with an opening gala April 10. The exhibition will feature 21 floral designs that complement or respond to a piece of artwork in the museum.
  • 3/26/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    “The End of the Tour,” a new film about a journalist’s five insightful days with “Infinite Jest” author David Foster Wallace, will be among the featured films at this year’s Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, running April 15-19 in Champaign-Urbana.
  • 3/12/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A multimedia production tells the story of U.S. Marines stationed in Afghanistan – not just the stresses they face from fighting a war, but also the emotional toll on their families and the struggles to readjust when veterans return home. “BASETRACK Live,” a documentary theater piece about the impact of war on veterans and their families, will come to Krannert Center for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. March 18.
  • 3/2/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A two-day symposium hosted by the University of Illinois School of Music will look at creative responses to World War I, starting with the musical interpretations of the iconic poem “In Flanders Fields.”
  • 2/27/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Artist William Wegman is best known for his photographs of his Weimaraners, but his work also includes painting, drawing and video. Wegman received his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Illinois in 1967, and he’ll return to campus next week to speak at Krannert Art Museum, 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, at 5:30 p.m. March 5.
  • 2/13/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    While it may be tempting to dismiss as a censor anyone who wants to restrict access to a book, such individuals understand that books are powerful and have the potential to change lives, said Emily Knox, who recently wrote about the people who raise challenges to reading material.
  • 2/11/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois School of Architecture is a charter member of a new research consortium of the American Institute of Architects, focusing on issues of design and health.
  • 2/2/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Christos Tsitsaros, a professor of piano pedagogy at the University of Illinois School of Music, has been named the 2014 Distinguished Composer of the Year by the Music Teachers National Association.
  • 1/28/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The artwork in the comic books would look familiar to any comic book fan. A well-muscled, green-skinned man and a Wonder Woman-type character square off against several figures with the faces of humans and bodies of snakes. The comic book – written in Hindi and published by Raj Comics – is one of about 1,000 Indian comic books in the University of Illinois library system. South Asian Studies librarian Mara Thacker began collecting the comics for the University of Illinois in 2012, and its libraries now have what she believes is the largest collection of Indian comics in North America.
  • 1/14/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Modernism has ignited a new passion among designers and collectors, who value the movement’s objects as historical icons. It also has inspired artists who are using modernist design objects in their own work to comment on the movement’s cultural significance. That artwork forms the exhibition “MetaModern,” opening at Krannert Art Museum on Jan. 29.
  • 1/9/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH) has been awarded a $2,050,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to create research groups in three emerging areas in the humanities.
  • 1/7/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    If it seems as if most terrorists are Muslims and almost all immigrant lawbreakers are Latinos, it may be because you’re watching national TV news – not because those things are true. That’s one implication of a study of five years of network and cable crime news led by University of Illinois communication professor Travis Dixon.
  • 1/5/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A University of Illinois music professor who developed a computer application for teaching music theory has received a National Science Foundation grant to complete development of a prototype and test it in a classroom next fall.
  • 12/22/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor
    In a review of the scholarly research that captured the most public attention online this year, three of the top 100 articles had authors from the University of Illinois.
  • 12/22/2014The Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has received a grant of nearly a half million dollars to catalog rare Italian books and make them accessible to scholars. writer The Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has received a grant of nearly a half million dollars to catalog rare Italian books and make them accessible to scholars. by The Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has received a grant of nearly a half million dollars to catalog rare Italian books and make them accessible to scholars. published by The Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has received a grant of nearly a half million dollars to catalog rare Italian books and make them accessible to scholars.
    The Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has received a grant of nearly a half million dollars to catalog rare Italian books and make them accessible to scholars.
  • 12/9/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Five University of Illinois scholars have received National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2015. The U. of I. is the only institution to be awarded more than three of the fellowships for the coming year.
  • 8/19/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor; Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor; Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor; Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor; Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I with a cross-campus initiative that includes theater productions, a film series, concerts, lectures, symposiums, an art exhibition and a general education course. “The Great War: Experiences, Representations, Effects” is designed for Illinois students and the local community to gain a new understanding about the first industrialized conflict carried out on a global scale.
  • 6/26/2014Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    In 1989, when Gilbert Witte started working full-time at the University of Illinois library, he discovered that his new job had a strange effect on his leisure time: After spending eight hours surrounded by books, the last thing he wanted to do at home was read. Consequently, Witte took up a hobby – he taught himself to crochet.
  • 4/29/2014Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Among librarians and booksellers, hymnals and children’s books are infamous for their low survival rate, as a result of overuse and abuse. So when the staff at the University of Illinois Rare Book and Manuscript Library found an eight-page unbound copy of the ABCs and common prayers published in 1536 – more than 450 years ago – they immediately ran the title through several international databases to see if any other libraries had a copy. None did.
  • 4/2/2014Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The religious tradition that brought us yoga, meditation and the concepts of karma and reincarnation will be the topic of this year’s Marjorie Hall Thulin Lecture in Religion, an annual event sponsored by the University of Illinois department of religion. Vasudha Narayanan, the distinguished professor of religion at the University of Florida and author of “Hinduism” and “The Vernacular Veda: Revelation, Recitation and Ritual,” will deliver the lecture at 8 p.m. April 9 (Wednesday) at Spurlock Museum. Her topic, “Global Hinduism,” will touch on Southeast Asia, the Caribbean and the United States.
  • 3/20/2014Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The 200th anniversary of the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history will be marked by the publication of a new book by University of Illinois professor Gillen D’Arcy Wood. If you think the title character might be Vesuvius, or Krakatoa, or maybe Pinatubo, you’re wrong. Wood’s focus is Tambora – a mountain in the Indonesian archipelago that erupted so violently in April of 1815 that today, it is ranked as “super colossal” on the scientific Volcanic Explosivity Index. And the explosion was only the first dose of Tambora’s destructive power.
  • 1/14/2014Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities has been awarded a $3 million grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to fund a consortium of 15 humanities institutes.
  • 11/13/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Growing up in Chicago’s Hyde Park-Kenwood neighborhood, Audrey Petty lived about two miles from the Chicago Housing Authority’s Robert Taylor Homes. Those 28 high-rises, arranged in horseshoe clusters along the Dan Ryan Expressway, contained more than 4,400 apartments, giving the complex the dubious title of largest public housing development in the nation. But though she could practically see the drab concrete towers from her doorstep, Petty regarded the Robert Taylor Homes as a foreign, mysterious and impenetrable enclave.
  • 9/18/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The popular Pygmalion Music Festival, held annually at the University of Illinois Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Krannert Art Museum and other venues in Urbana-Champaign, has added a two-day literary festival this year. Among the writers who will be reading from their works: Matt Bell, the author of “In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods”; Dan Chaon, the author of “Among the Missing” and “You Remind Me of Me”; and James Greer, the author of “Artifical Light,” “The Failure” and “Guided By Voices: A Brief History.”
  • 9/18/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Best-selling author Kim Stanley Robinson will deliver the keynote lecture at “Writing Another Future,” a symposium on science fiction, the arts and humanities, Sept. 25-27 (Wednesday-Friday) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to presentations and panel discussions, the event will include several concerts. Organizers hope the symposium will spark interest in science fiction writing as part of the university’s ongoing explorations of science, technology and society.
  • 9/10/2013Jeff Unger writer Jeff Unger by Jeff Unger published by Jeff Unger
    Six Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars. The program recognizes excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The faculty members will be honored at a campus reception Tuesday (Sept. 10) from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois St., Urbana.
  • 6/10/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    John P. Wilkin has been named university librarian and dean of libraries at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, effective Aug. 16, pending approval by the U. of I. Board of Trustees at its July 24 meeting in Chicago.
  • 5/17/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Students in the University of Illinois Education Justice Project have received the Arcus Prize for Collaborative Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College in Michigan. The students project, Language Partners, was one of three entries honored last week from among 188 submitted by organizations in 23 nations. The $30,000 award will be split with two other social justice organizations.
  • 5/15/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    University of Illinois English professor Ted Underwood recently wrapped up a research project involving more than 4,200 books. Since that work revealed dramatic shifts in the English language between the 18th and 19th centuries, hes now expanding his research to include more than 470,000 books almost every English language book written during that era and preserved in a university library.
  • 4/29/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The demand for translators and interpreters is projected to increase by at least 20 percent by the year 2020, and a new program at the University of Illinois will offer a masters degree to equip graduates to fill those jobs. Elizabeth Lowe, the director of the U. of I.s Center for Translation Studies, says the program offers both on-campus and online options, and is accepting applications now for courses that will begin in the fall.
  • 2/11/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Behavioral problems among teenagers and preteens can be blamed on the violence, sex and gore portrayed in the media marketed to them that was the topic of televised public hearings held by the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency in 1954 to address the scourge of comic books. The hearings, which resulted in the decimation of what was an enormous comic book industry, had been inspired in large part by the book Seduction of the Innocent, by psychiatrist Fredric Wertham, based on his own case studies.
  • 1/29/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Kathleen Graber -- a former high school English teacher who was inspired to write poetry after taking students on a field trip -- will read from her critically acclaimed collections at 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 13 (Wednesday) at the Illini Union Bookstore.
  • 1/18/2013Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    In an apparently unpublished and previously unknown poem, Carl Sandburg addressed the topic of guns. Titled A Revolver, the short piece was discovered last week among Sandburgs archives, housed in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 11/27/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Holiday shoppers hoping to please the youngsters on their gift lists can turn to the Guide Book to Gift Books published by the Center for Childrens Books at the University of Illinois.
  • 11/12/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Zong-qi Cai, a professor of East Asian languages and cultures at the University of Illinois, has created a unique scholarly journal in partnership with Peking University in Beijing and Duke University Press.
  • 10/19/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    England, Greece, heaven, hell, Portugal, Poland, purgatory and Russia all these locales will be on the itinerary Tuesday (Oct. 23) when the Italian studies program at the University of Illinois hosts a Dante marathon. Beginning at 9 a.m., Dantes Divine Comedy will be read aloud, in its entirety, following a tradition that dates back to the first circulation of the 14th-century text in Florence, Italy. In a gesture meant to engage the broader campus community, the reading will involve speakers of more than a dozen languages, ranging from the texts original Italian to Arabic, Catalan, Czech, English, French, Galician, German, modern Greek, Hungarian, Mandarin, Portuguese, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.
  • 9/13/2012Madeline Ley, News Bureau intern writer Madeline Ley, News Bureau intern by Madeline Ley, News Bureau intern published by Madeline Ley, News Bureau intern
    Overcoming the disparity of the "digital divide" -- the gap between people who have access to modern technology and those who do not -- is the subject of a lecture series sponsored by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois.
  • 9/13/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    This fall's Center for Advanced Study/MillerComm lectures will look back to the poetry of Yeats and forward to the future of Chinese fiction and the role of engineers and scientists in international security.
  • 9/12/2012Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    The war and military necessity are what prompted Lincoln to issue his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation 150 years ago, says historian Bruce Levine, but the Civil War itself was by then already working to dismantle slavery and upend the southern society built around it.
  • 4/2/2012Dusty Rhodes writer Dusty Rhodes by Dusty Rhodes published by Dusty Rhodes
    Martin E. Marty religion scholar, the author of more than 60 books and recipient of the National Humanities Medal will deliver the annual Marjorie Hall Thulin Lecture in Religion at the University of Illinois on April 12 (Thursday). He will speak on the topic, Because I Am a Citizen: Religion and the Common Good in Today's America.
  • 4/2/2012Dusty Rhodes writer Dusty Rhodes by Dusty Rhodes published by Dusty Rhodes
    The School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics will offer its Intensive Foreign Language Instruction Program this summer.
  • 3/27/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Tom Easton, an award-winning journalist and the Asia business editor of The Economist, will give the keynote address April 5 (Thursday) at a colloquium on the role Japan and China play in the American economy.
  • 2/29/2012Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The memes controversy exemplifies the type of issues that are the focus of the American University Meets the Pacific Century Project a social science research laboratory guided by U. of I. professors Nancy Abelmann (anthropology, Asian American studies, East Asian languages and cultures), Soo Ah Kwon (Asian American studies, human and community development), Tim F. Liao (sociology, statistics) and Adrienne Lo (anthropology).
  • 11/2/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    An ancient Egyptian mummy has had quite an afterlife, traveling more than 6,000 miles, spending six decades in private hands, and finally, in 1989, finding a home at the World Heritage Museum (now the Spurlock Museum) at the University of Illinois. The mummys travels did not end there, however. It has made two trips to a local hospital once in 1990 and again this year for some not-so-routine medical exams.
  • 10/18/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The Return of the Mummy: New Imaging Results on the Spurlock Museums Egyptian Mummy will be the most thorough public presentation yet of the many types of evidence collected in 1990 and again in 2011. The symposium will begin at 4 p.m. in the Knight Auditorium of the museum at 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana.
  • 9/8/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    The Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois will explore the impact of indigenous poetry on the expressive cultures of the Western Hemisphere with a poetry reading featuring Ins Hernndez-Avila and Heid Erdrich on Tuesday (Sept. 13).
  • 8/30/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    An author described by The New York Times Book Review as a writer for all readers will open the annual Carr Reading Series. Rolando Hinojosa-Smith who earned his doctorate at the U. of I. in 1969 and is the Ellen Clayton Garwood Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Texas in Austin is best known for Klail City Death Trip, which tells the stories of the residents of a fictional Lower Rio Grande Valley county in a series that so far numbers 15 volumes.
  • 8/22/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Luminarium a novel by University of Illinois creative writing professor Alex Shakar already is garnering glowing reviews. It will be released Tuesday (Aug. 23).
  • 8/9/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Parents considering enrolling their young children in after-school piano lessons, ballet classes, gymnastics or martial arts now have another option for enriching their future a Spanish language course. Taught by native or near-native Spanish speakers, the curriculum presents Spanish to children ages 4 through 8 using games, crafts, stories and songs.
  • 8/8/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A large-scale project designed to bring old and often obscure books into the digital age has yielded a surprising bonus at University of Illinois: Not only will the text of the books become fully searchable online, but the original versions the old-fashioned kind a reader can hold are being rescued from the library stacks, repaired and preserved.
  • 5/16/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A new research center created by the University of Illinois and Indiana University, along with HathiTrust Digital Repository, will develop software to foster computer access to the growing digital record of knowledge.
  • 5/9/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Many parents enroll their young children in piano lessons, ballet class, gymnastics or martial arts, figuring that getting a jump-start on these skills will serve their children later in life. Silvina Montrul suggests that parents consider another option a foreign language course.
  • 3/29/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    John L. Esposito, the author of more than 30 books on the politics of Islam, will speak on The Future of Islam and Muslim-West Relations at the annual Marjorie Hall Thulin Lecture in Religion at the University of Illinois.
  • 3/3/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Illinois Poet Laureate Kevin Stein will be among the writers featured at the Early Spring Literary Festival at the University of Illinois March 13-16.
  • 2/28/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A few years ago, Robert Dale Parker was in a basement library reading microfilm he had ordered from the Library of Congress when he found a trove of poems written by an Ojibwe Indian. The fact that the poems were literate and lyrical pleased Parker, a literary critic, but the fact that they were from 1815 made him ecstatic.
  • 2/24/2011Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    The ability to search full-text sources is not the magical tool some scholars, laypersons and even some librarians would have us believe, say Kathryn LaBarre and Carol L. Tilley, professors of library and information science at Illinois.
  • 2/14/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Atomic Light in the Public Light, is a series of lectures and film screenings beginning Tuesday (Feb. 15) sponsored by the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. The series examines the use of film as a tool of science and propaganda in national efforts to develop and justify the world's most powerful nuclear weapons.
  • 1/24/2011Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A nonprofit publishing enterprise once described by its founder as a hopelessly quixotic venture has been named recipient of the National Book Critics Circles Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • 12/9/2010Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    The Spurlock Museum at the University of Illinois has made a major addition to its collections with a gift of more than 1,000 artifacts from Africa, Asia and Central America.
  • 10/6/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    A celebrated poet who spent five years living and working among the Amish and two authors whose work has explored topics ranging from the workings of historical figures' minds to circus life will be the speakers during the Fall 2010 Carr Reading Series on the University of Illinois campus.
  • 10/5/2010Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor
    Matti Bunzl, the director of the Program in Jewish Culture and Society at Illinois, has been appointed as the next artistic director of The Chicago Humanities Festival, the largest humanities festival in the U.S.
  • 9/30/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    About 70 noted scholars and practitioners from around the world will convene at the University of Illinois Oct. 14-16 for an international conference about translation and its effect on the humanities.
  • 9/20/2010Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    The proliferation of scientific research data is creating an urgent situation for organizations and professionals charged with data handling and stewardship, according to new research published by Melissa Cragin, a University of Illinois expert in information science.
  • 9/13/2010Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Robert Tierney's new book, Tropics of Savagery: The Culture of Japanese Empire in Comparative Frame (University of California Press), explores the theme of savagery in Japanese literary works during Japans colonial period (1895-1945).
  • 7/8/2010Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Dale E. Brashers, the head of the department of communication at the University of Illinois, died July 5 in his campus office. He was 50 years old.
  • 4/21/2010Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Arts Editor
    Although World War I has faded from cultural memory, overshadowed by more dramatic and unambiguous conflicts that both preceded and followed it, the Great War continues to shape Americans interpretations of their nation, its war-craft and its soldiers today.
  • 4/5/2010
    If you think Facebook, Twitter and other Web sites that foster online communication and interaction are merely vapid echo chambers of self-promotion, think again, say two University of Illinois professors who study computer-mediated communication and the Internet.
  • 2/24/2010Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    With the world awash in information, curating all the scientifically relevant bits and bytes is an important task, especially given digital datas increasing importance as the raw materials for new scientific discoveries, an expert in information science at the University of Illinois says.
  • 12/10/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    he impact of text messaging on the decline of formal writing among teens has been debated in pedagogical circles ever since cell-phone ownership became an adolescent rite of passage in the mid-2000s. But according to a University of Illinois expert in media literacy, not only are critics who argue that texting is synonymous with literary degradation wrong, they also often overlook the bigger role that texting and its distant cousin, tweeting, could play in education and research.
  • 11/20/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    You dont need to be a bibliophile to know that a book is quite possibly the perfect holiday gift for a child. As any lover of literature knows, books are just as immersive and entertaining as video games, they dont require batteries and wont crash while theyre being used.
  • 11/5/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Although comics have been published in newspapers since the 1890s, they still get no respect from some teachers and librarians, despite their current popularity among adults. But according to a University of Illinois expert in childrens literature, critics should stop tugging on Supermans cape and start giving him and his superhero friends their due.
  • 10/13/2009Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    Its harvest time in Illinois. But at the University of Illinois, members of the English faculty have been hard at work in their own field cultivating words and growing the departments reputation all year long.
  • 10/12/2009Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    A new initiative at the University of Illinois will bring together scholars from many disciplines to explore the Holocaust and other genocides as well as racism, memory and trauma. Shimon Attie, a Brooklyn artist famous for his work on Holocaust-related themes, and James E. Young, a leading scholar of Holocaust memorials, will stay at the U. of I. campus as the Krouse Family Visiting Scholars to help kick off the new Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide and Memory Studies.
  • 10/7/2009Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Irit Rogoff, a professor of visual cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London, will discuss how the arts are influencing globalization and are producing unexpected cultural phenomena and new knowledge during a lecture Thursday (Oct. 8) at Levis Faculty Center at the University of Illinois.
  • 3/3/2009Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Despite the increased popularity of geek culture and the ubiquity of computers, the geek’s close cousin, the nerd, still suffers from a negative stereotype in popular culture. This may help explain why women and minorities are increasingly shying away from careers in information technology, says Lori Kendall, a professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science.
  • 11/20/2008Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    Whether you’re looking for a picture book, an age-appropriate nonfiction title or a page-turning thriller, let the 2008 edition of the Guide Book to Gift Books, now available as a downloadable PDF file be your book-buying guide.
  • 10/27/2008Phil Ciciora, News Editor writer Phil Ciciora, News Editor by Phil Ciciora, News Editor published by Phil Ciciora, News Editor
    What stands a better chance of surviving 50 years from now, a framed photograph or a 10-megabyte digital photo file on your computer’s hard drive? The framed photograph will inevitably fade and yellow over time, but the digital photo file may be unreadable to future computers – an unintended consequence of our rapidly digitizing world that may ultimately lead to a “digital dark age.”
  • 9/11/2008Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Many have speculated that the election of a black president would signal the arrival of a “post-racial” America, a country moving past its problems of race. But we’ve been here before, says University of Illinois historian David Roediger, the author of several books about race in U.S. history, including one published this month. Many previous events and forces have likewise promised and failed to resolve issues of race in the U.S.
  • 6/24/2008Melissa Mitchell writer Melissa Mitchell by Melissa Mitchell published by Melissa Mitchell
    It may not have the circulation of the Huffington Post – yet – but University of Illinois English and linguistics professor Dennis Baron’s “The Web of Language” is the best-read blog published using software created by the university’s Web Services.
  • 6/17/2008Sharita Forrest writer Sharita Forrest by Sharita Forrest published by Sharita Forrest
    This summer, a new book co-written by a University of Illinois librarian and faculty member is the foundation for an exhibition that explores the early history of the English language and the role that printing played in its development.
  • 4/23/2008Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Scholars who study visual culture on the Internet always see more than meets the eye, but one professor has widened her scope even more, trying to adjust the ways the rest of us look at race and gender on the Web – and off.
  • 12/17/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Geography students at the University of Illinois have literally mapped the clothes on their backs to examine regional patterns in apparel manufacturing.
  • 12/17/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    As a cautionary tale, the latest issue of Presidential Studies Quarterly could not make better reading for the '08 presidential candidates, blue and red.
  • 12/11/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Within only a few months of its release in English, a university press's exposé of the hidden "queer world" of Europe in the 1920s is going into a second printing.
  • 12/4/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If the part of your brain that controls gift-book-shopping for children hasn't clicked into gear yet, fear not. Experts in children's literature at the University of Illinois can jump-start the process with a comprehensive list of warm and fuzzy, cool and hip books for any kid on your list.
  • 11/8/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The World Series may be over, but the echo of baseball's deep past is very much in the air in LeAnne Howe's new novel, "Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story" (Aunt Lute Books).
  • 10/29/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    African films and filmmaking, including Nollywood, the burgeoning film industry in Nigeria, will be the focus of an international conference at the University of Illinois Nov. 8-10.
  • 10/29/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois has reshaped the study of language, literature and culture on campus by creating a new administrative unit, the School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics.
  • 10/26/2007Roxana Ryan, News Bureau intern writer Roxana Ryan, News Bureau intern by Roxana Ryan, News Bureau intern published by Roxana Ryan, News Bureau intern
    The dedication of the Cline Center for Democracy will take place from 1:30-3 p.m. Monday (Oct. 29) at the center's new home, 2001 S. First St., Suite 207. The center previously was known as The Center for the Study of Democratic Governance.
  • 10/25/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Questions about human migration from Asia to the Americas have perplexed anthropologists for decades, but as scenarios about the peopling of the New World come and go, the big questions have remained. Do the ancestors of Native Americans derive from only a small number of "founders" who trekked to the Americas via the Bering land bridge? How did their migration to the New World proceed? What, if anything, did the climate have to do with their migration? And what took them so long?
  • 10/4/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Jeff Corntassel will be the next speaker in the "Indigeneity as a Category of Critical Analysis Speaker Series" at the University of Illinois.
  • 10/4/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Three award-winning fiction writers - Susan Power, Roy Kesey and Katharine Min - will visit the University of Illinois on Oct. 15, Nov. 5 and Nov. 7, respectively, to read from and talk about their work.
  • 9/27/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Evelyne Bloch-Dano, the author of "Madame Proust: A Biography," will give a lecture about her new book Oct. 15 on the U. of I. campus.
  • 9/26/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Hollywood doesn't give librarians much of a break.
  • 9/18/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois Press is hosting a book show and a book TV bus this month.
  • 9/7/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Virginia R. Dominguez, recruited as an "excellence hire" by the University of Illinois anthropology department in January, has been elected president-elect of the American Anthropological Association. Her term as president-elect begins Dec. 2; she becomes president in two years.
  • 8/29/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Spectacular items of material culture - some going back more than 10,000 years and all of them made by the Native Peoples who lived on the land that became Illinois - will be on display in an exhibition at the University of Illinois.
  • 8/21/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Who will rescue digital granddaddies such as "Pac-Man" and "Mario" and hundreds of other digital game superheroes from oblivion? Who ultimately will save the creative and popular virtual worlds from (self) destruction?
  • 8/14/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Overwhelmed by all the chaos - personal or planetary? Then dust off your Plato and put a little cosmology in your life. That's what some top thinkers are doing.
  • 8/2/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Those old 8 mm, Super 8 or 16 mm home movies collecting dust in attics and basements across Champaign-Urbana could be valuable sources of history, if they were restored to first-rate condition or preserved.
  • 8/2/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Blogged your way through the history of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair lately? How about the history of the Spanish American War in Cuba as seen through the eyes of an African-American physician from Illinois?
  • 7/25/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Spouses who experience doubts about their marriage, even weak doubts, make pessimistic judgments about their partner's behavior in conversation.
  • 7/6/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Despite the wealth of information available to them, baseball writers, historians and aficionados somehow have managed to bench one of the game's greatest stories.
  • 6/19/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois is gearing up to build hundreds of new bridges to other countries and cultures - but it won't be using any of the traditional materials of construction.
  • 6/19/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    For students of African languages who want an immersive learning experience that also emphasizes the rich, diverse cultures of the African continent, this summer the University of Illinois is where it's at.
  • 6/12/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Although he's not yet 25 and has only just entered the profession, Christopher Cook already is regarded as an expert in his trade.
  • 5/31/2007Melissa Mitchell, News Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, News Editor by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
    The wife of Nobel Prize-winning Russian author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn will be the featured speaker at a University of Illinois conference devoted to her husband's contributions to modern Russian literature, history and political life.
  • 5/30/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    An international who's who of pioneers and practitioners in the field of digital humanities will gather at the University of Illinois for a major conference.
  • 5/9/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois, home to one of the world's biggest libraries, the nation's top-ranked library and information school, a nascent Center for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, a supercomputing center and key scholars, is poised to become a leader in the effort to "digitize the humanities."
  • 4/30/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Scholars will gather at the University of Illinois for a conference that will explore some of the spicier aspects of 15th-century England, including saints, sexualities, sieges and sins.
  • 4/17/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Despite their reputations for being prudes and their Queen's famous comment to the contrary, Victorian folks could be amused. Quite, in fact.
  • 3/15/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    As many Americans know, Sam Clemens led a rich and complex life - sometimes as Mark Twain, sometimes not. He usually is remembered as a journalist, stand-up comic, world traveler, philosopher, and literary giant.
  • 2/20/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois has joined an alliance of educational institutions, Internet companies and other groups in the U.S. and abroad that is building a massive digital archive of public domain books for universal and free public access.
  • 2/5/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    "The True Story of Stellina,"written and illustrated by Matteo Pericoli, has won the 2007 Gryphon Award for Children's Literature.
  • 2/5/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Hold on to your bearskin hats and your macramé snoods, readers: You are in for a wild verbal ride through your deep, deep past.
  • 1/18/2007Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    American literary history is about to change. An early Native American writer who has been a largely forgotten figure is entering the canon and getting the recognition she has long deserved.
  • 12/13/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Researchers have discovered a subtle new difference between men and women - this one occurring in the realm of eating.
  • 12/7/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Misunderstood genius or misogynist? Playwright or novelist? Alchemist or artist? Beyond being the unquestioned father of modern prose drama, who was the real August Strindberg and what was he really trying to communicate?
  • 12/5/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If children's books are on your holiday shopping list, but you're already snowed under with shopping, or worse yet, paralyzed by the avalanche of books out there, professional help is on the way.
  • 12/1/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The leading independent publisher specializing in literary translations of contemporary international titles, mostly fiction, will make its new home at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 11/9/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Ediitor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Ediitor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Ediitor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Ediitor
    A new study finds that recent Mexican immigrants in Chicago possess a wealth of artistic, cultural, and networking assets and that those assets contribute to the social, cultural and economic well being of many Chicagoland neighborhoods, organizations and institutions.
  • 11/1/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    On the 60th anniversary of the "departmentalization" of four of France's overseas colonies, scholars from across the United States and from abroad are coming to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to explore the consequences of this rare form of colonialization.
  • 11/1/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Six students at the University of Illinois are wearing white gloves in class this semester. They're learning to handle issues of age and fragility with aplomb and to make excellent first impressions.
  • 10/16/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois' top-rated library school has won another award for its excellence in online teaching and learning.
  • 10/2/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Archaeologists believe they have found the Illinois home of the founder of St. Louis.
  • 9/14/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A professor of American Indian Studies and of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is taking her show on the road quite literally this fall, shifting her venue, if only temporarily, from the classroom to television and movie theaters.
  • 8/16/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Hang in there, parents. There is some hopeful news on the video-gaming front.
  • 8/1/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has added a new service.
  • 7/25/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Robber barons apparently didn't come by their titles easily. Just how hard they had to work - on both sides of the law - to hold on to their empires is revealed in a new book about one particularly ingenious and controversial tycoon.
  • 6/21/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A top U.S. rare book and manuscript library has begun taking the embarrassment out of its embarrassment of riches by making all of its collection accessible.
  • 6/13/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    There still are many realms where communications between the United States and China are strained or non-existent, but the realm that includes libraries, librarians and librarianship is not among them.
  • 5/31/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    How does an imaginative but irascible writer - the future author of 100 books and the grandfather of science fiction - thank his literary partner and wife for her steady, selfless and sterling contributions to his career?
  • 5/15/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    President George W. Bush frequently has been criticized for being verbally challenged, but a new rhetorical analysis of the Bush White House, based on the public record, argues that the president and his colleagues have demonstrated an impressive facility with the language.
  • 4/28/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    In his new volume of poetry, Laurence Lieberman again beckons readers to explore the islands that have bewitched him for more than 40 years.
  • 4/7/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A race to find early Christian writings before fanatical groups discover and destroy them, sinister Bedouins and spirited archaeologists, papyrus writings by a "Deborah of Damanhur," one of 12 female apostles of Christ.
  • 3/2/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    What's not to like about today's youth films, titles like "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire?"
  • 2/21/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    One of the 12 people who will vote in a historic special election for Negro League inductees into the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Feb. 27 says that the research involved in choosing the candidates changed history.
  • 2/20/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Thousands of endangered materials spanning at least seven centuries will be rescued at the Library of the University of Illinois of Urbana-Champaign.
  • 2/6/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Nigerian librarians are wrestling with serious problems - insufficient bandwidth, unstable power and limited access to research materials, but they are about to receive some help thanks to a new grant to the Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 1/20/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The winner of the 2006 Gryphon Award for Children's Literature is Michelle Edwards for her easy-to-read book, "Stinky Stern Forever." Edwards also illustrated the book, published last year by Harcourt.
  • 1/17/2006Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The New Year has brought two changes for the Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - a name change and the creation of a bibliophiles' club.
  • 12/14/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Creatures ugly, endearing and dangerously curious, including a monster named "Bobo," a legendary "She" sea spirit and a "Traction Man," are among hundreds of protagonists book experts are recommending kids get to know this year, and they all appear in the 2005 edition of the "Guide Book to Gift Books."
  • 12/7/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois Library got the scholarly equivalent of a grand slam late Tuesday night.
  • 12/5/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign would like to say it ain't so, but it is.
  • 11/10/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    With the benefit of computer imaging and macro-photography, a scholar who has spent two years studying six fragmented clay tablets from the ancient Canaanite civilization is proposing some new interpretations of the tablets.
  • 10/25/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    An author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist has given his professional papers to the Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 9/27/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Lewis and Clark traveled 4,000 miles over more than two years on their epic journey west. But, says the curator of a new exhibition celebrating the 200th anniversary of their odyssey, they weren't often blazing trails. Far from it.
  • 9/20/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The 159-year-old Smithsonian Institution has opened its doors - and collections - to a slightly younger cousin across the country.
  • 9/9/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Acting out of a sense of both personal trauma and political distress at the scope of the Katrina Hurricane catastrophe and what he calls the "failure of the response," a professor who taught at Tulane University in New Orleans has set up a public online forum to address the disaster.
  • 8/24/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    For young Americans, the "food landscape" in television advertising is packed with junk food, according to a new study.
  • 8/9/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Results from the first long-term study of online videogame playing may be surprising.
  • 7/27/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    What adults don't know about teens' use of the Internet and other high-tech services could fill a book.
  • 7/12/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    On Friday (July 15) a dozen or so Americans are going to Russia, openly in search of "Soviet secrets and Russian revelations."
  • 7/7/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Little did the ancient Egyptians know that the afterlife they were preparing one mummy for would be as a key character in a new mystery novel.
  • 6/6/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Despite - or perhaps because of - the barrage of information about food that they consume while watching television, kids are getting the wrong message about healthy eating.
  • 6/1/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Valerie Hotchkiss has been selected to head the Rare Book and Special Collections Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 6/1/2005Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    As they have each summer since 1973, scholars soon will converge on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from all compass points to participate in the annual Summer Research Laboratory on Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia.
  • 5/20/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If it's possible to know a person by the books he reads, patrons of one of the world's largest libraries soon could be on a first-name basis with an award-winning author, commentator and observer-provocateur.
  • 5/11/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    This summer, millions of Americans will morph overnight.
  • 5/2/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A scholar working on a book about the war in Iraq agrees with a recent Human Rights Watch report that described Abu Ghraib as only the "tip of the iceberg" in terms of U.S. involvement in prisoner abuse.
  • 4/21/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The Mortenson Center for International Library Programs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant that will, through the development of automated systems, assist it in helping African librarians to better serve the research needs of their users.
  • 4/13/2005Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Students at Urbana Middle School are being encouraged to turn off their televisions for one week at the end of April. They're also learning how to be wiser about what they watch, with help from teachers, administrators and the College of Communications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 2/4/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The winner of the 2005 Gryphon Award for Children's Literature is Monika Bang-Campbell, for her easy-to-read book, "Little Rat Rides" (Harcourt, 2004). Molly Bang illustrated the book.
  • 2/2/2005Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Like the mangoes that splash across his beloved spiritual home in the islands of the Caribbean, the poems in Laurence Lieberman's latest collection are colorful, lush, seductive and rich with cultural and restorative qualities.
  • 12/23/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    On the eve of the 103rd anniversary of her death on Jan. 22, the woman whose name defined an age - arguably the most famous woman of modern times - comes to life in a new and myth-shattering biography.
  • 12/8/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If the second issue of Ninth Letter were candy, it would be a 10-pound box of assorted chocolates.
  • 12/7/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A lazy fat cat, a fragrant but soulful garbage truck and sin - in many of its incarnations - are just three of the intriguing subjects explored in the 2004 edition of the "Guide Book to Gift Books," an annual annotated list of recommended books for children.
  • 12/4/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    First there was "Sex and the City," the television show - a hit and hip cable comedy celebrating women's sexuality and the urban experience. And soon there will be "Sex and the City," the college course - arguably a more cerebral incarnation of the racy and controversial show.
  • 10/28/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has launched a multi-year study to learn how Korean immigrant families achieve academic and economic success in the face of the challenges and struggles they encounter in the United States.
  • 10/25/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Using cutting edge "tools of discovery" and a diamond-sharp new process called data-mining, information scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are beginning work that eventually will help scholars carve out new literary knowledge in the works of writers across languages, cultures and time.
  • 10/3/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A national treasure is adding another gem to its collection
  • 10/1/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been chosen as one of the lead institutions in a massive new Library of Congress project to save at-risk digital materials nationwide.
  • 9/1/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Professor John Jakle continues to be a fearless Roads Scholar.
  • 8/30/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the new editorial home of the prestigious Journal of Women's History (JWH).
  • 8/23/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Although frequently ignored by the literary establishment during his lifetime, a self-described "peoples' poet" and outspoken-but-loyal critic of the United States is celebrated posthumously in a new anthology of his work.
  • 7/22/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The Spanish Civil War explodes to life again - in all its heroics and horror - in a new acquisition and exhibit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 7/19/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Page by page, America's rich agricultural history is being ravaged, not by boll weevils, not by locusts, not by critters of any kind, but by time.
  • 7/14/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    As most librarians know, time has a way of destroying history. Age can yellow and stain the paper history is written on; it can dry it out and embrittle it; it can tear it, and ultimately reduce it to powder.
  • 7/1/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Independence Day has taken on new layers of meaning for a team of archaeologists who've been digging in western Illinois this summer.
  • 6/16/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Despite his roving bohemian soul, his penchant for abandoning people and places, and his radical politics, which kept him one step ahead of intelligence agents, Claude McKay could not outrun one thing: fame.
  • 4/29/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Roger Ebert, the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, will give his papers to his alma mater, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 4/21/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    In the trade, they're often called "little" literary magazines.
  • 4/13/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The John Philip Sousa collection at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is marching to the beat of a different drummer, and by all appearances, it is a quick march.
  • 4/7/2004Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    In today's landscape of popular culture - in which Michael Jackson and sister Janet, Britney Spears, and cast members from the latest reality-TV show are the gods and goddesses of the moment - the name Richard Wagner appears on few billboards or marquees.
  • 4/6/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    At a time of year when people are firming up their summer plans, students in a college history course are wrapping up a three-month journey.
  • 3/19/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Ira Berlin, a historian and the Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, has been named a Mellon Distinguished Senior Fellow for the spring semester at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/19/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The first winner of the new Gryphon Award for Children's Literature is Douglas Florian, for his collection of poetry, "bow wow meow meow: it's rhyming cats and dogs" (Harcourt, 2003).
  • 2/17/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    International library experts at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded a grant that will allow them to work with seven African university libraries.
  • 2/16/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Advances in genetics during the last decade not only have influenced modern medicine, they also have changed how human evolution is studied, says an anthropologist from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 2/13/2004Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Long-lost stories about one of the most complex, secretive, dangerous and successful collaborations among black freemen, slaves and white abolitionists are told in a new book, "Fleeing for Freedom: Stories of the Underground Railroad" (Ivan R. Dee).
  • 11/4/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Two chatty critters and one very verbal vehicle - that is, a wolf who cried "boy," a worm who kept a diary and a garbage truck who talked and talked and talked - are among the protagonists, probable and less so, who made it into this year's "Guide Book to Gift Books," an annual annotated list of recommended books for children.
  • 10/14/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    One would expect the library of the future to look moderately, perhaps even extremely, different from its current incarnation.
  • 9/26/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A conference focusing on the Shaw Brothers Studio, a path-breaking filmmaking enterprise that was founded in Shanghai, and later based in Singapore and Hong Kong, runs Oct. 2-4 (Thursday through Saturday) on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 9/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Professor Helaine Silverman's "death course" will have a new twist this semester.
  • 8/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    What began in April as a simple Web site to provide background information for a campus forum on the war in Iraq, is today a rich blueprint for tracing the war, the peace and the complex aftermath, including the basis for those "16 words" about uranium and Africa that President Bush and the world have been buzzing about.
  • 8/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    A giant of a book has just joined a crowded field - a field that already enjoys, according to its editors, "a vast range and profound depth of contributions that continues to grow exponentially."
  • 8/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Certainly few literary correspondences more movingly trace the friendship between a mentor and a protégé than that of Carl Sandburg and Kenneth MacKenzie Dodson. The letters glow with the details of a quick, deep relationship set against the backdrop of World War II and based on mutual awe for each other-s work - and code of ethics.
  • 7/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Thanks in part to new spectroscopic technology, researchers have solved a great mystery concerning some of North America's oldest pieces of sculpture.
  • 6/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    As scholars know so well, special collections have a funny way of winding up half a world away from where they originated. Which is why, for example, the papers of the late British novelist Rebecca West are at the University of Tulsa, and those of her fellow countryman and lover, the late novelist H.G. Wells, are at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 6/1/2003Craig Chamberlain, News Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, News Editor by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, News Editor
    Thirty years ago this month, the nation's attention was riveted on the Watergate hearings in the U.S. Senate, and the testimony there would help bring down a president.
  • 6/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    In his new book about battle, a military historian may surprise, even shock, some readers - including top members of the military and the Bush administration - with some of his claims and rejections. It is fair to say that he goes into battle against some current sacred cows.
  • 5/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    The Illinois Newspaper Project (INP) is both finding and making news.
  • 5/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Like the fictional ugly ducking, there is an area of literature for children that has been overlooked. In the trade, that area is called "transitional reading."
  • 5/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Historians keep an assortment of theories in their toolboxes to explain the causes of major events - Marxism, the "Cyclical Theory," the "Great Man Theory," among them.
  • 4/28/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    After many decades of operating out of modest quarters in a remote, cramped, low-ceilinged part of a basement, one of the world's largest libraries of its kind is moving up in the world - into a large and totally remodeled space.
  • 4/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    The problem has long vexed librarians: How do you give scholars and other patrons free reign to use old, precious and rare materials without taking the chance that they will damage them through use or, worse yet, carelessness?
  • 3/21/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The problem has vexed librarians for centuries: How do you give patrons free reign to use precious and rare materials without taking the chance that they will damage them through normal use or carelessness?
  • 3/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    The often-mythologized tale of one slave's struggle for freedom has only now - 163 years later - been stripped of its many fictions.
  • 3/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Now there was an autopsy - one even the clever medical examiners of "CSI," television's prime-time hit show, haven't yet attempted.
  • 3/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    One of America's most disastrous - and unauthorized - military campaigns was chronicled, oddly enough, in a historical novel written by a femme fatale/Southern Belle.
  • 3/1/2003Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor
    Consider two countries - both caught in the vise grip of revolution, both grappling with standards of citizenship and minority populations challenging those standards. One country has democratic/liberal pretensions, the other, authoritarian tendencies.
  • 12/17/2002Andrea Lynn , Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn , Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn , Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn , Humanities Editor
    What do Madonna and the Bible have in common? What about the French poet Charles Baudelaire and the boxing legend Muhammad Ali?
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Sites once occupied by the ancient people who created some of the pre-Columbian world���s most exquisite art, largest ground drawings, most ingenious hydraulic engineering and most intense "trophy hunting" of human heads, are identified and explored in a new book.
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Books make great gifts for kids, no doubt about it. But, how do you decide which book would be good for the child or children on your list?
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Books make great gifts for kids, no doubt about it. But, how do you decide which book would be good for the child or children on your list?
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Archaeologists have hit pay dirt at Poverty Point, La.
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Americans take verbal shortcuts to say someone is intellectually underwhelming -- he's no brain surgeon ... no rocket scientist ...no Einstein.
  • 12/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Americans take verbal shortcuts to say someone is intellectually underwhelming -- he's no brain surgeon ... no rocket scientist ...no Einstein.
  • 11/4/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Books make great gifts for kids - no doubt about it.
  • 11/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Although notoriously impenetrable to the common reader, the French novelist Marcel Proust has somehow managed to infiltrate many popular cultures over the decades since his death in 1922. He even got into a recent episode of the hit TV drama "The Sopranos."
  • 11/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Talk about a trip!
  • 11/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    As many people learned in school, Carl Sandburg considered himself a "Poet of the People."
  • 10/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Before the United States attacks Iraq, Americans should consider the principle the Bush administration is using as it moves closer to war, because "It is hard to grasp and impossible to exaggerate how novel, sweeping, dangerous, and subversive of world order and peace that principle is," a historian says.
  • 10/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    War with Iraq would be costly - in any number of ways, two historians say.
  • 9/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Why have so many American writers remained obsessed with a war that ended 60 years ago? And why does their story suddenly seem so relevant today? A new anthology gathers this history together and provides the answers.
  • 9/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Why have so many American writers remained obsessed with a war that ended 60 years ago? And why does their story suddenly seem so relevant today? A new anthology gathers this history together and provides the answers.
  • 9/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Digging under a blazing sun in an Illinois cornfield, archaeologists this summer unearthed a fascinating anomaly: a 900-year-old square hilltop village. The discovery near Shiloh - about 15 miles southeast of St. Louis - challenges previous notions of the area's first people and adds a piece to the puzzle that was Cahokia, a huge "mother culture" that suddenly appeared, and just as suddenly vanished, leaving only traces of its majesty and meaning in the 11th century.
  • 9/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Digging under a blazing sun in an Illinois cornfield, archaeologists this summer unearthed a fascinating anomaly: a 900-year-old square hilltop village. The discovery near Shiloh - about 15 miles southeast of St. Louis - challenges previous notions of the area's first people and adds a piece to the puzzle that was Cahokia, a huge "mother culture" that suddenly appeared, and just as suddenly vanished, leaving only traces of its majesty and meaning in the 11th century.
  • 7/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Probing deep and wide, in original directions and in ideas drawn from the latest scholarship on "whiteness," the author of a new book explores the racial complexion of America.
  • 5/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The home has been imagined variously in modern times as everything from a castle to a money pit, a hat rack to a place where buffalo roam.
  • 5/1/2002Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor writer Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor by Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor published by Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor
    During the past 100 years, scientists have tossed around a great many hypotheses about the evolutionary route to bipedalism, and what inspired our prehuman ancestors to stand up straight and amble off on two feet.
  • 4/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Coleridge must not have been paying attention, for in the 19th century, poetry actually promoted the sciences. Poetry by women, that is.
  • 4/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Coleridge must not have been paying attention, for in the 19th century, poetry actually promoted the sciences. Poetry by women, that is.
  • 4/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A college literature course that rose from the ashes of Sept. 11 is sparking heated debate - not only about the unprecedented acts of terrorism on U.S. soil, but also about the current violence in the Middle East and about the response of the West, the media and historians.
  • 3/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Rarely in history has the dissent of the lower classes been more vocal than in Russia in 1917. Yet that outrage has remained silent and inaccessible to successive generations.
  • 3/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Conjure up an image of an 18th-century Frenchwoman, and what do you see? Marie Antoinette, perhaps, dressed in an elaborately pouffed and layered gown of silk, its edges embellished with ribbons and lace, both the bodice and hemline dangerously low.
  • 2/15/2002Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor writer Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor by Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor published by Andrea Lynn, HumanitiesEditor
    One of the fundamental assumptions about primates is under attack.
  • 2/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    It becomes clear early into "Fire on the Beach," the new history of the only all-black maritime lifesaving crew in the United States, that the "fire" in the title is a metaphor.
  • 2/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    It was "bound" to happen. Hobbits have hit the halls of ivy.
  • 2/1/2002Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    To the casual observer, Robert Mooney's photographic exhibition at the University of Illinois' I space gallery in Chicago may appear to be a technically well-crafted set of images reflecting the pristine landscape of national-park lands in the American Southwest.
  • 2/1/2002Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A new book of previously unpublished writings details daily life at one of the weirdest creative writers' colonies ever to operate in the United States - or perhaps anywhere.
  • 12/20/2001Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    That H.G. Wells' intelligence was rivaled only by his appetite for women has never been a secret.
  • 12/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    The ayes have won another vote in the hotly contested scholarly debate over the authorship of a set of medieval love letters.
  • 12/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities/Social Sciences Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities/Social Sciences Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities/Social Sciences Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities/Social Sciences Editor
    Finally. The site of a well-documented but long-lost 18th century French frontier village has been found in a former city neighborhood of Peoria, Ill.
  • 12/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Oddly enough, one of the fastest growing Arabic language programs in the United States isn't in a metropolis, but rather, at a university in the rural Midwest.
  • 12/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Oddly enough, one of the fastest growing Arabic language programs in the United States isn't in a metropolis, but rather, at a university in the rural Midwest.
  • 11/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Since Sept. 11, Americans have been inundated with images: the crumbling twin towers of the World Trade Center; the FBI's 22 most-wanted terrorists; Osama bin Laden on videotape.
  • 11/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    When she meets her students in Religion 110 - a survey course on world religions - in mid-November, Valerie Hoffman, an authority on Islamic thought, will address issues raised by the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States. But then Hoffman, a professor of religious studies at the University of Illinois, has "always addressed the linkage of Islam with violence - whether that linkage is real or imagined - in one form or another ever since I started teaching."
  • 10/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Pearl Harbor has been invoked repeatedly as a parallel to the Sept. 11 attack on the World Trade Center: It was a sneak attack on Americans and eventually will provoke a military response. But one historian sees another connection.
  • 8/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A new book of poetry hopes to put Illinois on the map of 20th century poetry.
  • 8/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    After a century of nearly complete scholarly silence about the poetry of the American left, scholars are now giving this revolutionary literature its due.
  • 8/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A team of archaeologists, including students, working under a blazing summer sun on a high hill near O'Fallon, Ill., have made a rare find.
  • 8/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    To say that the French novelist Marcel Proust was attentive to every detail of publishing his great work, "A la Recherche du Temps Perdu" ("In Search of Time Lost"), is a bit of an understatement.
  • 8/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Fragments of red stone artifacts - bits of smoking pipes, decorative ear lobe spools and a figurine, all plucked out of rich prehistoric soil in the U.S. Midwest - used to tell one story about the complex culture and the ancient people who left them behind. Now they tell another.
  • 7/11/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Carbon isotope evidence in almost 6-million-year-old soils suggests that the earliest humans already were evolving in - and likely preferred - humid forests rather than grasslands, report a team of scientists working in Ethiopia.
  • 7/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Thanks to a new book of essays in honor of a living eminent historian of Victorian Britain, readers can trace the modern department store to the expansive, elaborate and sometimes ethereal market halls of Liverpool and Leeds, built in 1822 and 1857, respectively.
  • 5/15/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Library directors and regional government officials from across Russia currently are meeting with their U.S. counterparts in several Illinois towns and cities. The group's two-week immersion in U.S. library and local government management, which began May 11, is a first step in a major Russian-American effort to begin expanding Russia's book-oriented public libraries into active information centers.
  • 5/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Perhaps the strangest creative writers' colony ever to operate in the lower 48 was more a prison than a haven, its director more a warden than a muse.
  • 4/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Historian Frederick Hoxie introduces his new volume of writings from early American Indian reformers with a startling statement: "Of all the myths that distort our understanding of the Native American experience, none is more powerful than the belief that the rise of the modern United States caused the destruction of the Indians' culture."
  • 3/12/2001Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor writer Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor published by Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor
    Central Illinois residents will get a rare glimpse of the collections of Russia's Hermitage Museum this month, without having to travel halfway around the world to do so.
  • 3/12/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    An advanced creative writing program has been established in the American heartland. Rooted in the rich prairie soil - as is Iowa's famed writers' workshop, the new University of Illinois program will offer, its planners say, another first-rate opportunity for the nation's most promising writers.
  • 3/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    What distinguished near-modern humans from their predecessors 300,000 years ago, it is widely believed, was their ability to make and use complex tools, but there is no consensus among experts about how this dazzling leap in technology influenced human evolution.
  • 3/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If wit is, as Mark Twain said, the poor cousin of humor, then that cousin is now in debtors' prison. Sure -- the quip is still revered in conversation, but in literature, wit gets no credit or respect.
  • 2/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Even if you're a castaway, you're not lost -- intellectually speaking. You now have MAPS -- a new aid for surveying and navigating the world of modern American poetry.
  • 2/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    She seems to be everywhere -- in magazines, on television, the silver screen, the Internet. She also seems to own everything -- her own television show, cable TV network, entertainment group, magazine, book club. And now she has yet another venue: the college classroom.
  • 2/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A new study confirms what many experts have long suspected about how people use Internet news sites: Online readers tend to avoid -- and insulate themselves from -- the goings-on in the larger world around them.
  • 12/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A quick holiday quiz: Name one ancient yet abiding Christmas tradition. If you answered "attacking the institution of Christmas," you would be right.
  • 8/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Perhaps one day the American slave ship Creole will become as famous as the Spanish ship Amistad, and Madison Washington, the African-American slave who led the rebellion on the Creole, will be as well known as Cinque, the African slave who led the revolt on the Amistad.
  • 6/1/2000Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor
    The United States has a new dollar coin, and a hip George Washington is making the pitch for it on television.
  • 5/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    In his new volume of poetry, "Flight From the Mother Stone," Laurence Lieberman turns once again to the rich mythology of his spiritual home, the Caribbean Islands -- an enchanted realm, indeed, where humans and beasts slip in and out of supernatural acts as if they're molting, and where even daily life offers myriad opportunities for magic, metamorphosis, rebirth.
  • 5/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    This summer, the history department at the University of Illinois won't just be teaching history, it will be making it, by sending four groups of professors and students abroad -- to Cuba, France, India and Russia --? and in the process doubling its typical summer overseas course offerings.
  • 4/17/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    A collection of rare, priceless and perishable 19th century European dissertations and other short scholarly works on Latin and Greek literature, history and civilization, will get a new life - and a wider readership - thanks to a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to the University of Illinois Classics Library.
  • 4/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    When 60 scholars from around the world arrive in mid-April at what for them will be a new landscape -- the University of Illinois -- it's likely they'll know who once wrote, "The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes."
  • 3/1/2000James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Nearly 1,000 years before St. Louis became known as the Gateway to the West, another expanding culture had created a major ceremonial mound complex that is now called Cahokia. By all accounts, Cahokia was huge, consisting of hundreds of platform mounds, supported by a population numbering in the thousands. At issue, however, has been whether Cahokia was part of a regional trade network that stretched from the Great Plains to the South Atlantic.
  • 3/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Showcases that typically display rare and priceless Bibles now are featuring scriptures of another kind -- the scripture according to daytime television.
  • 2/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    If 6-year old Cuban refugee Elian Gonzalez were to settle permanently in the United States, by the time he reached adulthood, he would relate his horrific ordeal in fluent English. Elian's fluency primarily would be a result of sociological opportunities (length of residence in the United States and educational attainment) and maturational constraints tied to age at onset of language learning -- in his case, as a young child.
  • 2/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Archaeologists have discovered what the well-dressed Ice Age woman wore on ritual occasions. Her outfit, however, including accessories, doesn't resemble anything Wilma Flintstone ever wore, or, for that matter, any of our carved-in-stone conceptions of "paleofashion."
  • 2/1/2000Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Cary Nelson expects to catch some flak for his new "Anthology of Modern American Poetry" (Oxford), but he doubts anyone will accuse him of taking the easy way out. Rather, the avowed maverick clearly has taken the road less traveled.
  • 8/7/0200Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    Scientific travelers of the 18th and 19th centuries led waves of daring expeditions into Polynesia, netting oceans of discoveries about its geography, flora and fauna and people.