Cline Center News and Announcements

Cline Center News and Announcements

  • 2/17/2017

    It’s a good time to be working at the intersection of data science and social science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: the university just announced the formation of the Illinois Data Science Initiative (iDSI). The Cline Center’s Director, Prof. Scott Althaus, is a member of the Steering Committee supporting this effort to provide data science tools to solve intractable problems in every area of inquiry at the U of I.

    Stay tuned — iDSI is dedicating the rest of 2017 to a series of themed summits, where students, researchers on campus, industry and government partners, and the public at large can help identify challenges, opportunities, and potential collaborations.

    Interested? You can sign up for iDSI email updates at: https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/1101895
    Our thanks go out to the organizations funding iDSI’s first efforts: our friends at National Center for Supercomputing Applications - NCSA, the University of Illinois College of Business and College of Engineering.

  • 2/15/2017

    The Cline Center is looking for a few good thinkers to join our civil unrest research team. Analysts will work at our office in Champaign 20-25 hours per week, and will begin as paid trainees.

    We’re looking for folks with at least a bachelor’s degree — all are welcome to apply, but we tend to prefer a background in a social science fields like Political Science, Geography, Psychology, Sociology, Global Studies, etc. Pay will increase from $9.50 to $11/hour at the completion of training.

    For more details and to submit an application, go to: http://bit.ly/2kKHPgY

  • 2/1/2017

    A panel including Cline Center Faculty Affiliates Professors Lesley Wexler and Colleen Murphy, as well as Prof. Jason Mazzone of the University of Illinois College of Law will provide scholarly analysis of President Trump's recent immigration-related executive order.


    The event is free and open to the public at noon on Friday, February 3rd in the Max L. Rowe Auditorium of the Law Building. Details are here: https://goo.gl/Rj6trA

  • 10/27/2016

    The Cline Center for Democracy is very pleased to announce that Sheila Krumholz, Executive Director of the Center for Responsive Politics (Opensecrets.org) will deliver the keynote address of the 21st annual Cline Symposium, entitled ““Money in American Politics: Open Secrets, Closed Doors and the Fight for Transparency.” The event is open to the public and will take place on November 11, 2016 at 7:00PM in the Ballroom of the Alice Campbell Alumni Center.

    The 2016 Symposium will focus on dilemmas raised by the role of money in American democracy. We will explore the tensions between the right to freely speak and participate in the ‘free market’ of ideas and the need to ensure access to the public square is an equal right and not an elite prerogative. Regulating the business of politics means balancing the influence of powerful special interests that might thwart or manipulate the ‘will of the people,’ with free speech and privacy considerations. The effects of ‘dark money,’ the Beltway ‘revolving door,’ transparency, and potential options for campaign finance reform will be central to the discussion.

    Members of the public are also welcome to participate in a roundtable session with our expert panel, including Ms. Krumholz and OpenSecrets.org’s Research Director, Dr. Sarah Bryner, veteran campaign strategist Anne Hathaway, Prof. Chris Mooney, Director of the Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs (IGPA) and Prof. Vikram Amar, an expert on constitutional issues in election law and Dean of @College of Law. Prof. Scott Althaus, Director of the Cline Center will moderate, and audience participation is welcome. Come join the dialogue in the Illini Union Ballroom at 3:30PM on the 11th.

    Additional information about the Symposium, lecture and panel can be found at: https://goo.gl/wnN2Ld and you can RSVP or get maps to the event by visiting our Facebook page

  • 8/18/2016

     The Cline Center for Democracy is pleased to announce the 2015-2016 David F. Linowes Faculty Fellows: Prof. Avital Livny (Political Science) and Prof. Dan Roth (Computer Science and the Beckman Institute). These exceptional scholars work in areas of core interest to the Cline Center; the Linowes Fellowship recognizes and supports their efforts to utilize and add value to Cline Center data and technology. 

    Prof. Livny works on identity politics and the comparative politics of the Middle East and Turkey. Her Linowes Fellowship project aims to enhance the Composition of Religious and Ethnic Groups (CREG) demographic data by cross-validating it with archived national censuses and a variety of survey-based datasets. This project should facilitate the creation of new time-varying measures of ethnic and religious diversity, as well as sub-national ethnic geography and inequalities in health, wealth and education.

    Prof. Roth works on machine learning and inference methods that enable natural language understanding. In his second year as a Linowes Fellow, he aims to expand the long-term partnership between the Cline Center and the Cognitive Computation Group by developing tools for transforming the raw, natural language of news text into structured data about events and the “frames” used to explain them.

    These projects reflect the values, goals and standards set by David F. Linowes during his long and distinguished service to the University of Illinois and the American people. A distinguished public servant appointed to a number of presidential commissions, he served as a US Army officer during WWII and as the Boeschenstein Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy at Illinois.   

     Generous gifts from Professor Linowes and his family enable the Cline Center to support these Faculty Fellows as well as the annual Linowes Lecture on Public Policy. These programs demonstrate Professor Linowes’ and the Cline Center’s shared commitment to applying cutting-edge academic knowledge to the most challenging policy issues and political problems facing democratic governance today.