University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

  • 8/27/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.
  • 8/24/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    One day soon, doctors may be able to determine how physically active you are simply by imaging your brain. Studies have shown that physically fit people tend to have larger brain volumes and more intact white matter than their less-fit peers. Now a new study reveals that older adults who regularly engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity have more variable brain activity at rest than those who don’t. This variability is associated with better cognitive performance, the researchers say.
  • 8/21/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A land use plan adopted for the Sacramento, California, region aimed to get local governments to plan together for development in a way that discouraged sprawl.
  • 8/17/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    In the summer of 2012, Olga Kotelko, a 93-year-old Canadian track-and-field athlete with more than 30 world records in her age group, visited the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois and submitted to an in-depth analysis of her brain.
  • 8/13/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Rogue supernovas that explode all alone in deep space present an astronomical mystery. Where did they come from? How did they get there? The likely answer: a binary black hole slingshot, according to a new study by Ryan Foley, a professor of astronomy and physics at the University of Illinois.