University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

  • 7/16/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian (and occasionally other) elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. A new study begins to address this knowledge gap, and offers new tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants.
  • 7/15/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers have developed a faster and more accurate way to test for infection with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is killing snakes in the Midwest and eastern United States. The test also allows scientists to monitor the progression of the infection in living snakes.
  • 7/14/2014Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

    The phenomenon of "boomerang employees" is not unique to professional athletes, says two studies co-written by T. Brad Harris, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • 7/10/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    Teaching youth to “just say no” has long been viewed as the first line of defense in the war on drugs. And several studies have provided compelling evidence that refusal skills training, which teaches participants strategies for resisting social pressure, can be successful at preventing youth from trying drugs and alcohol.
  • 7/7/2014Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

    When student-athletes sue the NCAA, the governing body of college athletics eventually wins more than 70 percent of the time on appeal – a finding that could pressure both groups to adopt a new model for amateur athletics that more closely resembles the employment relationship, says Michael LeRoy, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.