University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: News

  • 7/14/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Fathers who read to their infants with autism and take active roles in caregiving activities not only promote healthy development in their children, they boost moms’ mental health too, new research suggests.
  • 7/10/2015Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    Think of a scientist at work, and you might picture someone at a lab bench, doing a physical experiment involving beakers or petri dishes and recording his or her findings, which will eventually form the basis for a scientific paper.
  • 7/8/2015Allison Vance, Campus Communications writer Allison Vance, Campus Communications by Allison Vance, Campus Communications published by Allison Vance, Campus Communications
    During development, children must learn both broad facts about the world (that dogs have four legs, for example) and information that is more specific (that the family dog is scared of snow). While research in developmental psychology suggests that young children should have an easier time learning specific, concrete facts, a new study reveals that they learn general facts so effortlessly that they often can’t tell that they learned anything new at all.
  • 7/7/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    Each cell in the body contains a whole genome, yet the data packed into a few DNA molecules could fill a hard drive. As more people have their DNA sequenced, that data will require massive computational and storage capabilities beyond anything previously anticipated, says a new assessment from computational biologists and computer scientists at the University of Illinois and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
  • 7/1/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home.