University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Calendar

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Calendar

  • 4/28/2015

    Michael R. Ward, PhD, JD from Morrison & Foerster, San Francisco will present "Intellectual Property in Agriculture."

  • 4/30/2015
  • 5/1/2015

    Abstract:
    A surge in the number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean Sea to reach Europe forces the European Union to rethink its approach on immigration. Existing procedures, largely aimed at enforcing strict border control rather than addressing humanitarian needs, are insufficient to adequately assist migrants arriving from Africa and the Middle East. Efforts to correct these shortcomings occur at a time when populist political forces with strong anti-immigration views are on the rise across member states.

    Bio:
    Romina Spina is a Swiss-Italian journalist based in Italy, where she covers politics and business for the renowned Swiss daily newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. She has also written for magazines, websites and international wire services, including the Associated Press, and is a contributor to German academic publications. Her areas of interest include the economy, globalization, international trade, and human rights. Among other areas of study while visiting the United States, she plans to research how the globalized economy is affecting ordinary Americans and their families. She is currently visiting the US as a CSIS Transatlantic Media Fellow.  

     

  • 5/4/2015

    Everything around us, everything each of us has ever experienced, and virtually everything underpinning our technological society and economy is governed by quantum mechanics. Yet this most fundamental physical theory of nature often feels as if it is a set of somewhat eerie and counterintuitive ideas of no direct relevance to our lives. Why is this? One reason is that we cannot perceive the strangeness (and astonishing beauty) of the quantum mechanical phenomena all around us by using our own senses.

    I will describe the recent development of techniques that allow us to image electronic quantum phenomena directly at the atomic scale. As examples, we will visually explore the previously unseen and very beautiful forms of quantum matter making up electronic liquid crystals [1,2]; hybridized heavy-fermions [3, 4]; topological surface-states [5]; and high temperature superconductors [6,7]. I will discuss the implications for fundamental physics research, and also for advanced materials and new technologies, arising from these quantum matter visualization techniques.

    [1] Science 315, 1380 (2007)

    [2] Science 327, 181 (2010)

    [3] Nature 466, 374 (2010)

    [4] Nat. Phys. 9,  468 (2013)

    [5] PNAS 113, 1316 (2015)

    [6] Science 336, 563 (2012)

    [7] Science 344, 612 (2014)

  • 5/5/2015

    Join us with music and food to celebrate Cinco De Mayo!  Lunch will be provided, first come, first serve.