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Agriculture News

Agriculture News

  • 6/13/2013Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor
    To keep pace with the ever-increasing demand for renewable energy, forest management policy in the U.S. must evolve to address environmental sustainability issues, says Jody Endres, a professor of bioenergy, environmental and natural resources law at Illinois.
  • 3/13/2013Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor
    Brenna Ellison, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics, says the combination of a symbol and a numeric calorie count on a menu is the most effective way to influence patrons to select lower-calorie items.
  • 2/18/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    It has been almost 20 years since the first genetically modified foods showed up in produce aisles throughout the United States and the rest of the world, but controversy continues to surround the products and their regulation.
  • 12/10/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Agricultural researchers and health educators are using cellphone technology to help those in the developing world address some of the most challenging issues they face. The initiative, Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO), delivers educational materials in the form of narrated, animated videos to a global audience.
  • 9/12/2012Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor writer Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor published by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor
    In a time of record-high food insecurity rates in the U.S., cutting the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the former Food Stamp Program) is the wrong approach to fighting hunger, says Craig Gundersen, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at Illinois.