Agriculture News | University of Illinois

NewsBureauillinois
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo

Agriculture News

Agriculture News

  • 1/10/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A turning point in the history of life occurred 2 billion to 3 billion years ago with the unprecedented appearance and dramatic rise of molecular oxygen. Now researchers report they have identified an enzyme that was the first or among the first to generate molecular oxygen on Earth.
  • 8/23/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    The brown marmorated stink bug scientific name Halyomorpha halys has been found in four Illinois counties and could be a major threat to fruit, vegetable and agronomic crops if it proliferates.
  • 7/12/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Growing perennial grasses on the least productive farmland now used for corn ethanol production in the U.S. would result in higher overall corn yields, more ethanol output per acre and better groundwater quality, researchers report in a new study. The switch would also slash emissions of two potent greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.
  • 5/12/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    More than 90 percent of Illinois corn producers polled at the University of Illinois Extension Corn and Soybean Classic meetings indicated that they planned to plant corn that was genetically modified with the insect-killing protein Bacillus thuringiensis this spring. Commercially available since 1996, Bt corn is resistant to European corn borers, western corn rootworm and other crop-destroying insects.
  • 4/28/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    In addition to causing widespread flooding, the rains drenching the Midwest this spring may exacerbate another environmental problem phosphorus and nitrate pollution in the water supply that is causing a growing hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico, presenting a danger to marine life and wildlife habitats, according to recent studies by a team of scientists from the University of Illinois and Cornell University.