Life Sciences News

Life Sciences News

  • 7/12/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Well, nuts.
  • 5/24/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    One of the five newly named research themes of the Institute for Genomic Biology under construction at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has landed the institute's first major federal grant.
  • 4/21/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Although the doors of the Institute for Genomic Biology won't open for two years, 31 faculty and 35 affiliates from 25 campus units have been chosen to be in five newly named research themes in the state-of-the-art facility under construction at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 4/6/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studying vaccinia virus, a close relative of smallpox, have determined that a gene necessary for virus replication also has a key role in turning off inflammation, a crucial anti-viral immune response of host cells.
  • 2/24/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    One of the most damaging crop pests, the corn earworm, may be outwitting efforts to control it by making structural changes in a single metabolic protein, but new insights uncovered by molecular modeling could pave the way for more efficient insecticides, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/29/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Two schools of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will soon begin to explore how genes regulate cellular metabolism, eventually leading to ways to enhance overall human health, thanks to a $1.1 million grant from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust.
  • 10/16/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    In 1998, scientists found the mammalian version of a gene, known as timeless, which in flies is crucial for the biological clock. However, all but one of the research groups involved determined that timeless did not have such a role in mammals. Now that research group says timeless is indeed a key timekeeper in mammals.
  • 10/9/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Genes and behavior go together in honey bees so strongly that an individual bee's occupation can be predicted by knowing a profile of its gene expression in the brain, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 9/25/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Emerging geochemical and biological evidence from Alaskan lake sediment suggests that slight variations in the sun's intensity have affected sub-polar climate and ecosystems in a predictable fashion during the last 12,000 years.
  • 9/5/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Nine scientists of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are part of a newly created, federally funded Midwestern Regional Center of Excellence to be based at the University of Chicago.
  • 8/14/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers studying the nuclei of frog oocytes in early stages of meiosis - the cell division that gives rise to germ cells - have found that two key proteins remain apart at a crucial time before condensation occurs. One of the proteins, they say, may be important in the early organization of chromosomes and later may recruit the other.
  • 8/8/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A half-inch-long beetle known as the emerald ash borer, which is devastating ash trees in Michigan, poses a serious threat to Illinois, says an entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Officials fear that beetle-infested firewood could be accidentally transported into the state.
  • 6/24/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Biologists studying early pregnancy in ferrets have isolated a protein vital to embryonic implantation. The discovery at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign eventually could enhance assisted-reproductive efforts in many threatened species.
  • 6/23/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    High in the canopy of a Neotropical Panamanian forest, researchers have discovered that birds, especially native ones during the rainy season, protect trees by reducing the numbers of leaf-eating insects.
  • 6/6/2003Sharita Forrest, News Bureau writer Sharita Forrest, News Bureau by Sharita Forrest, News Bureau published by Sharita Forrest, News Bureau
    The Post Genomic Institute, a cutting-edge facility expected to lead the nation in biological research, was launched June 5 with a groundbreaking ceremony on the Urbana campus.
  • 4/2/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Insects are vital to every ecosystem and essential to our existence, Gilbert Waldbauer says, answering a common question posed by the title of his new book, "What Good Are Bugs?"
  • 2/17/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Fragile X syndrome and schizophrenia represent vastly different abnormalities of the brain, but they provide functionally similar examples of what happens when wiring processes go awry, neuroscientist William T. Greenough said Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • 2/17/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    New molecular technologies, some driven by the work of a researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are exposing unexpectedly high levels of DNA folding and complex protein-rich assemblages within the nucleus of cells that he says "seriously challenge the textbook models."
  • 2/17/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    On the popular television shows involving crime-scene-investigation units in Las Vegas and Miami, small traces of just about anything have been found and used to reel in criminal confessions. Note, however, viewers don't see the cases in court.
  • 2/6/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A newly developed tool that allows researchers to study strands of messenger RNA that bind to a specific protein has lifted a layer of mystery involving a common symptom of Fragile X syndrome, report scientists from four institutions, including the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 2/1/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    In celebration of its 20th bug-infested anniversary, the Insect Fear Film Festival at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is bringing in Mr. BIG - movie director Bert I. Gordon - to help honor the 50-year-old genre of low-budget films featuring large killer insects. The festival will feature three of Gordon's big bug films - "Beginning of the End" (1957), "Earth vs. the Spider" (1958) and "Empire of the Ants" (1977).
  • 11/18/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Each spring, amid the decaying rubble of dead prairie plants, emerging male gall wasps find mates by calling upon the chemistry prowess of their predecessors, entomologists scouring Central Illinois have discovered.
  • 10/16/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Herbivorous insects that dine on crops use a form of molecular code-breaking to ready their defenses against a chemically protective shield employed by their dinner, say scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/15/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A theory that suggests the aging process might be safely slowed by targeting genes that are quiet early but threaten damage later in life has gotten a boost from new findings from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 10/2/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    While studying tiny pieces of a genomic DNA sequence from the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae on Christmas Eve 1999, entomologist Hugh Robertson of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found several possible olfactory receptors similar to those others had found in Drosophila fruit flies.
  • 9/17/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The nation's first documented cases of domestic canine and squirrel deaths attributed to the West Nile virus have been confirmed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Officials stress, however, that people have a low risk of contracting the infection from affected animals.
  • 6/18/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A buzz being heard around the entomology department these days is a genomic celebration. Three departmental researchers will have key roles in a recently announced federal project to map the some 15,000 genes of a honeybee (Apis mellifera).
  • 6/17/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Life did not begin with one primordial cell. Instead, there were initially at least three simple types of loosely constructed cellular organizations. They swam in a pool of genes, evolving in a communal way that aided one another in bootstrapping into the three distinct types of cells by sharing their evolutionary inventions.
  • 5/21/2002Jim Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer Jim Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by Jim Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by Jim Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Using molecular microbiology techniques, scientists are a significant step closer to understanding and identifying the deadly microbes responsible for the mysterious black band disease that is destroying the world's coral reef ecosystems.
  • 5/21/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers are unraveling the mystery of what happens when a bacterium's toxin hits its cellular target. In an age of growing antibiotic resistance and a threat of bioterrorism, such knowledge may help to open new lines of treatment, says a microbiologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 4/25/2002James Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer James Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by James Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by James Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A new discovery in the brain of honeybees has researchers at three institutions suggesting that the gene they studied has played a key evolutionary role in the changes of food-gathering behaviors in many creatures.
  • 4/18/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Scientists have documented a ballet in which dancers cross the stage in a billionth of a second. The stage is a class of proteins found in all living things; the dancers are water molecules. The performance, captured by supercomputer simulation, casts new insight for biomedical researchers on the controlled movement of water through cell walls.
  • 3/12/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    An international consortium of U.S., Canadian and French scientists has begun work on a new resource that will enable the rapid and efficient sequencing of the entire cattle genome.
  • 3/12/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    An international consortium of U.S., Canadian and French scientists has begun work on a new resource that will enable the rapid and efficient sequencing of the entire cattle genome.
  • 2/15/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    If microbial life is found on Mars, will it be native to the planet or something carried there from Earth? Either way, will it be safe to return samples of such organisms to Earth? Astrobiology, the search for life elsewhere, says a University of Illinois microbiologist, is making us look a lot closer at microbial life on Earth - how it adapts and its relationship to emerging infectious diseases.
  • 2/6/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Growth-hormone therapy in elderly patients increases lean body mass and reduces body fat, helping them maintain fitness. Now, scientists say, the therapy also may dramatically boost the production of cells vital to fighting disease.
  • 12/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    You can forget global warming as the sole culprit. A combination of human sewage and shipyard discharge may be responsible for the development and spread of deadly black band disease in corals, researchers at the University of Illinois say.
  • 10/10/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois researchers have major roles in a newly announced $43.8 million National Science Foundation-funded initiative to define the function of the genes in a plant considered a model for understanding all plants. Eventually, their findings could have dramatic implications for all agricultural crops.
  • 10/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Caterpillars defend their homes by drumming up vibrations with their mandibles to drive intruders away, scientists say. At times, the nest-owner and intruder engage in duels that create a symphony of drum-like sounds.
  • 10/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A protein targeted by drug treatments in some patients with Alzheimer's disease also appears to play an important role in honeybees (Apis melifera), researchers say.
  • 9/10/2001Jim Barlow , Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow , Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow , Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow , Life Sciences Editor
    Pollen from a Bt corn variety carrying a now-phased-out genetically inserted pesticide known as event 176 dramatically reduced growth rates among black swallowtail caterpillars in University of Illinois field tests, researchers report.
  • 9/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The movement of pigment along roadway-like tracks in skin cells dictates the changing colors of frogs, fish and many other animals. To biologists looking beyond the color-shifting process, however, a more fundamental mechanism involved in cell division has come into view.
  • 8/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    A non-invasive diagnostic tool that can study changes occurring at the surface of the brain because of brain activity has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois. The technique is based upon near-infrared spectroscopy and is simpler to use and less expensive than other methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography.
  • 7/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A gene associated with the biological clock in many organisms has revealed yet another function. In honeybees, which live in a world with a distinct division of labor, the gene is more active in the brains of older bees, especially foragers whose jobs are outside the hive.
  • 7/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A Bt corn variety grown widely in East Central Illinois in 1999 had no adverse effect on black swallowtail caterpillars that thrive in weeds alongside cornfields, according to both field and laboratory studies at the University of Illinois.
  • 6/1/2001Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor writer Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor published by Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor
    That environmental scientists are working to find better ways to identify butterfly species in the wild is perfectly reasonable. That library scientists are collaborating in such natural-world endeavors seems highly unlikely. However, one such collaborative project is well under way at the University of Illinois.
  • 4/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Mice carrying the same gene deficiencies as humans with Duchenne muscular dystrophy experienced dramatic improvements in both their physical condition and life span following an experimental treatment by researchers at the University of Illinois.
  • 4/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    For someone with partial hearing loss, picking out a voice in a crowded social gathering can be hard, even with the help of a hearing aid. That's about to change in a revolutionary way.
  • 3/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Why do male but not female zebra finches sing?
  • 3/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A series of bisphosphonate drugs already approved to treat osteoporosis and other bone disorders in humans carry potent anti-parasitic activity, offering a new approach to the treatment of malaria, sleeping sickness and AIDS-related infections such as toxoplasmosis.
  • 2/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Around the world, beetles are eaten as food, fashioned into jewelry, widely collected and culturally honored. On film, they are evil flesh-eating tormentors and human enemies.
  • 2/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A protein located in the cytoplasm between a mammalian cell membrane and nucleus is more important than previously believed. It shuttles in and out of the nucleus as part of a "nuclear experience" that helps regulate cell growth and division, University of Illinois scientists say.
  • 12/18/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois biologists have discovered that a protein that lives in the cytoplasmic world between a mammalian cell's membrane and nucleus undergoes a "nuclear experience" that is necessary for regulating cell growth and division.
  • 11/1/2000James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Humans have a penchant for travel - driving, sailing and flying over the planet in search of new places to live. So do microbes, say researchers at the University of Illinois who have been studying microbial transport at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park.
  • 11/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Studies at the University of Illinois have identified a specific brain pathway in which neurons activate in times of low oxygen (hypoxia) and trigger increased breathing.
  • 11/1/2000James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    The ability to describe the rates at which microbial populations metabolize in the natural environment has been limited by the lack of a general theory of microbial kinetics. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois have found an approach that holds significant promise for extending the results of laboratory experiments to better understand microbial metabolism in nature.
  • 11/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    When axons connect with target cells, synapses form - a pivotal brain development stage that allows for such things as muscle coordination, learning and memory. The outward reaching fingers of axons, called filopodia, have been thought to be the driving force for these connections. However, a new view is emerging at the University of Illinois.
  • 10/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Animal scientists studying the genes of cattle say their first-ever comparative map of cattle and human genomes show that many genes -- even whole chromosomes -- are configured in the same way in the two species.
  • 4/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Conventional wisdom says that if you shop for groceries on an empty stomach you'll spend more than necessary because of impulse buying fed by hunger pangs, while a full stomach makes you a pickier shopper. You're in good company: Sea slugs shop the same way.
  • 4/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A simple study of rat brains has added more substance to the idea that the adult brain is still a work in progress, even well after puberty, say University of Illinois researchers. While overall size may not change, the composition of nerve fibers in a key area does.
  • 2/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Like aviators in training, honey bees preparing to forage learn their skills in a series of pre-flights to learn the landscape before undertaking new missions, scientists say.
  • 2/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Measurements showing vertebrate animals getting smaller during the course of a study normally are dismissed as measurement error or not possible. Eighteen years of data from the Galapagos Islands, however, indicate such shrinkage is both occurring and reversible.
  • 2/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Measuring hearing ability may not be as clear cut and predictable as specialists have long thought. University of Illinois researchers are beating a new drum, saying that responses of brain cells to single isolated tones don't predict how sounds in the real world are processed.
  • 2/1/2000James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Measuring hearing ability may not be as clear cut and predictable as specialists have long thought. University of Illinois researchers are beating a new drum, saying that responses of brain cells to single isolated tones don't predict how sounds in the real world are processed.
  • 2/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    "Bee" movie lovers will have a honey of a time Saturday, Feb. 26, at the 17th annual Insect Fear Film Festival at the University of Illinois.
  • 2/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    "Bee" movie lovers will have a honey of a time Saturday, Feb. 26, at the 17th annual Insect Fear Film Festival at the University of Illinois.
  • New model revises estimates of terrestrial carbon dioxide uptake
    12/10/0078Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new model of global carbon and nitrogen cycling that will fundamentally transform the understanding of how plants and soils interact with a changing atmosphere and climate.