Veterinary Medicine News

Veterinary Medicine News

  • 6/18/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A deadly fungal infection afflicting snakes is eerily similar to the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report.
  • 6/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Pet dogs may be humans’ best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, said University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs, he said.
  • 5/20/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Dolphins found stranded on Gulf of Mexico beaches following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill were much more likely to have severe lung and adrenal gland damage “consistent with petroleum product exposure” than dolphins stranded elsewhere and prior to the spill, researchers report. One in five dolphins from the spill zone also had primary bacterial pneumonia.
  • 4/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Two studies in mice add to the evidence that the phthalate DEHP, a plasticizing agent used in auto upholstery, baby toys, building materials and many other consumer products, can undermine female reproductive health, in part by disrupting the growth and function of the ovaries.
  • 4/15/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.
  • 2/26/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma.
  • 1/28/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways.
  • 1/21/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Two new drug compounds – one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis – appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine.
  • 10/23/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When bad weather strikes or illness invades, zoos and aquariums are among the most vulnerable facilities affected, said University of Illinois veterinarian Yvette Johnson-Walker, a clinical epidemiologist who contributes to emergency response training efforts at animal exhibitor institutions.
  • 7/15/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers have developed a faster and more accurate way to test for infection with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is killing snakes in the Midwest and eastern United States. The test also allows scientists to monitor the progression of the infection in living snakes.
  • 4/9/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Rabbits that remain indoors may suffer from a lack of vitamin D, researchers report in a new study. In rabbits kept as pets or used in laboratory studies, the deficiency could lead to dental problems, undermine their cardiovascular health, weaken their immune systems and skew scientific findings.
  • 11/20/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    The University of Illinois is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Daniel L. Rock, a professor of pathobiology, and Mark S. Kuhlenschmidt, a professor and the interim head of pathobiology, will pursue innovative global health and development research projects.
  • 10/21/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Chronic wasting disease, the deer-equivalent of mad cow disease, has crept across the U.S. landscape from west to east. It appeared first in captive mule deer in Colorado in the late 1960s. By 1981, it had escaped to the wild. It reached the Midwest by 2002. Little is known about its potential to infect humans.
  • 8/2/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Peter D. Constable, a Purdue University professor of veterinary clinical sciences and the head of that department, will become the dean of the U. of I. College of Veterinary Medicine in January 2014, pending approval of the U. of I. Board of Trustees.
  • 7/23/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Veterinary researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a general anesthetic for amphibians that is administered through their skin. The anesthetic jelly could be a low-cost, easy-to-administer form of anesthesia for veterinary work conducted in the field.
  • 7/16/2013Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Thanks to a new $2 million investment, a drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is on the road to human clinical trials. The compound, known as PAC-1, has so far proven safe and has promising anti-cancer effects in cell culture, in mouse models of cancer and in pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphomas and osteosarcomas.
  • 5/23/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Stuart C. Clark-Price, a specialist in anesthesiology and pain management in the U. of I. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, is leading a multi-university research project aimed at developing treatment protocols that help horses get back on their hooves quickly and safely after surgery.
  • 4/9/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    According to the World Health Organization, more than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. And its not just humans who are packing on the pounds. Our furry companions are plagued by an obesity epidemic of their own. More than 50 percent of the dogs and cats in the United States are overweight or obese.
  • 2/27/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Advancements in the use of computed tomography (also known as CT) imaging by researchers at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital are enabling them to diagnose life-threatening conditions in dogs and cats faster, dramatically affecting the course, outcomes and costs of treatment.
  • 2/4/2013Madeline Ley writer Madeline Ley by Madeline Ley published by Madeline Ley
    The Web has become a little more wild with the introduction of a website that explores human interactions with the natural world. The Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois recently created a classroom-focused website called Wildlife Encounters to educate students of all ages about the world around them.
  • 1/14/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD.
  • 10/24/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which can cause pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and sepsis likes to share its antibiotic-defeating weaponry with its neighbors. Individual cells can pass resistance genes to one another through a process called horizontal gene transfer, or by transformation, the uptake of DNA from the environment. Now researchers report that they can interrupt the cascade of cellular events that allows S. pneumoniae to swap or suck up DNA.
  • 9/7/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers report that myxoma a pox virus that afflicts rabbits but not humans, dogs or any other vertebrates so far studied infects several different types of canine cancer cells in cell culture while sparing healthy cells. The study adds to the evidence that viruses or modified viruses will emerge as relatively benign cancer treatments to complement or replace standard cancer therapies.
  • 9/26/2011
    Your dog may say woof woof (English), but at the University of Illinois Veterinary Medicine Open House on Oct. 2, there is bound to be a veterinarian who speaks your language.
  • 6/21/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study offers a detailed look at the status of Lyme disease in Central Illinois and suggests that deer ticks and the Lyme disease bacteria they host are more adaptable to new habitats than previously appreciated.
  • 5/12/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers tracking the spread of Toxoplasma gondii a parasite that reproduces only in cats but sickens and kills many other animals have found infected wildlife throughout a 1,500-acre (600-hectare) natural area in central Illinois.
  • 4/6/2011Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Like any other newborn, the neonatal horse can be a challenging patient. Its immune system is still under construction, its blood chemistry can vary wildly, and like most infants it wants to stay close to mom.
  • 3/30/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Veterinary radiologists in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois recently obtained what are believed to be the first 3-D internal renderings of dogs larynxes by using a restraint device they created that allows clinicians to perform CT scans on awake small animals without chemical restraint.
  • 2/7/2011Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Veterinarian Ken Welle joined the exotic animal department at the U. of I. Teaching Hospital last month after 22 years in private practice. The exotic animal service cares for a wide variety of species and comprises specialists with expertise in fish and reptiles, wildlife medicine and zoological medicine, in addition to Welle, who specializes in avian medicine and behavior.
  • 1/26/2011Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Sketches by more than 40 celebrity artists including Alan Alda and University of Illinois alumnus William Wegman will be auctioned along with autographed photos, vacation packages and nature-themed artwork at the 10th Annual Doodle for Wildlife.
  • 9/7/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers have identified a new target for the treatment of lymphoma and are testing a potential new drug in pet dogs afflicted with the disease. At low doses, the compound, called S-PAC-1, arrested the growth of tumors in three of six dogs tested and induced partial remission in a fourth.
  • 6/16/2010Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Mark Mitchell, a professor of veterinary clinical medicine, and his colleagues found antibiotic-resistant bacteria in sharks and redfish captured in waters off Belize, Florida, Louisiana and Massachusetts.
  • 7/28/2009Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    University of Illinois veterinary biosciences professor Paul Cooke co-led the research that may prove to be an effective alternative to the medical use of embryonic stem cells.
  • 7/22/2009Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    An international consortium has found that wild chimpanzees naturally infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV) – long thought to be harmless to the apes – can contract an AIDS-like syndrome and die as a result.
  • 9/10/2008Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers studying a critical stage of pregnancy – implantation of the embryo in the uterus – have found a protein that is vital to the growth of new blood vessels that sustain the embryo. Without this protein, which is produced in higher quantities in the presence of estrogen, the embryo is unlikely to survive.
  • 10/24/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Forest fragmentation threatens biodiversity, often causing declines or local extinctions in a majority of species while enhancing the prospects of a few. A new study from the University of Illinois shows that parasites can play a pivotal role in the decline of species in fragmented forests. This is the first study to look at how forest fragmentation increases the burden of infectious parasites on animals already stressed by disturbances to their habitat.
  • 6/27/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Human sperm cells travel up to 6 meters in their transit from testes to penis, and most of that journey occurs in the epididymis, a tightly coiled tube that primes the cells for their ultimate task: fertilization. In a paper released this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Illinois report that they have discovered a gene - and related mechanism - essential to the embryonic development of the epididymis.
  • 3/1/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers at the University of Illinois have found that a molecular pathway known to have a role in the progression of bone cancer in humans is also critical to the pathology of skeletal tumors in dogs and cats. Their work could lead to advances in the palliative care of companion animals afflicted with osteosarcoma.
  • 2/22/2007Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Scientists from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana have found that people employed in chimpanzee-focused research and tourism in a park in western Uganda are exchanging gastrointestinal bacteria - specifically Escherichia coli - with local chimpanzee populations. And some of the E. coli strains migrating to chimps are resistant to antibiotics used by humans in Uganda.
  • 7/25/2006James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    If your neighbor's barking dog drives you crazy, pity the employees of the nation's animal shelters, where the noise produced by howling, barking and yapping dogs often exceeds that produced by a jackhammer.
  • 4/6/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Fecal matter of red colobus monkeys collected in western Uganda has yielded a wealth of knowledge about human land-use change and wildlife health and conservation. The main lesson, researchers say, is that the intensity of tree removal translates directly to parasite populations and the risk of infection of their hosts.
  • 4/4/2006Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Sample sizes were small, but eyebrow-raising results from a study on a western Illinois farm have researchers and veterinarians taking a broader look at how swine producers battle an endemic viral disease that adds to their costs and threatens reproduction in their herds.
  • 10/13/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine has established a Web page with information about canine influenza, which has spread to pet dogs in 10 states after first being diagnosed in January 2004 at a Florida greyhound track. No cases have been reported in Illinois.
  • 7/5/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Using newly available biological technology, researchers have developed the first molecular portrait of multiple gene activity in diseased heart tissue taken from dogs near death from a devastating disease. The discovery sheds new light on the heart's response to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disease of large-breed dogs.
  • 6/14/2005Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Twenty-eight years after intense selective logging stopped in the region now known as Uganda's Kibale National Park, the red-tailed guenon (Cercophithecus ascanius) is a primate still in decline.
  • 3/29/2005Eva Kingston, State Water Survey and Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Eva Kingston, State Water Survey and Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Eva Kingston, State Water Survey and Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Eva Kingston, State Water Survey and Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Weather forecasts could become barometers for predicting the potential threat of West Nile virus to humans and wildlife, according to scientists at two state agencies based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 3/1/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Pups of female rats exposed to a combination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (MeHg) slip and fall more often trying to maneuver on a rotating rod than do pups from non-exposed moms, scientists say.
  • 2/10/2004Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    During the last decade, Val Beasley of the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine has led a team wanting to know why the world's amphibian populations have been dwindling or riddled with limb deformities.
  • 10/7/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    While the genetic blueprint for Shadow the poodle was being completed in Maryland, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been engaged in a long-term study that they hope will add functional gene information to the dog genome as well as benefit both canine and human health.
  • 6/17/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers looking inside a pathogenic soil bacterium have found an organelle, a subcellular pouch, existing independently from the plasma membrane. The discovery within a prokaryotic organism challenges the theory on the origin of eukaryotic organelles and suggests a targeted approach to killing many disease-causing organisms.
  • 2/7/2003Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Listen inside 34 percent of all U.S. homes and you'll hear some 75 million domesticated cats purring, some quietly, some loudly. Outside those homes, however, just as many such cats (Felis catus) are hungry strays.
  • 10/7/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Findings from 10 years of field research and a complex computer simulation suggest that swine producers should keep cats out of swine housing facilities to avoid Toxoplasma gondii infection of pigs and, in turn, reduce a human health risk.
  • 9/17/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The nation's first documented cases of domestic canine and squirrel deaths attributed to the West Nile virus have been confirmed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Officials stress, however, that people have a low risk of contracting the infection from affected animals.
  • 3/28/2002Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Officials of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources went fishing last August to collect samples. They caught largemouth bass at four lakes and two fish hatcheries, but shared no smiles. The bass in all six locations, says a University of Illinois scientist, were infected with a virus they were seeking but didn't expect to find.
  • 12/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    An early-detection technique developed to look for cancer-associated enzyme activity in humans is showing dramatic sensitivity to malignant tumors in cats and dogs.
  • 12/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Researchers tapping into the estrogen pathway that regulates fertility in males have found two independent roles of the hormone, and they may have uncovered a new approach for developing a male contraceptive.
  • 10/25/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine is home to a new federally funded center that will study the effects of exposure to toxicants in fish being eaten in large quantities by Laotian and Hmong refugees in Green Bay and Appleton, Wis.
  • 10/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    The health and welfare of African lions, leopards and cheetahs are coming into focus - in Illinois. What is being learned, researchers say, will help with the management of the threatened big cats in Africa, as well as those in zoos throughout the world.
  • 8/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Extensive damage to cells, reduced nitric oxide production and too much calcium buildup. These negative consequences followed open-heart surgery in mice and rats in the absence of estrogen. With estrogen or a soy-based equivalent, post-operative damage is much less.
  • 5/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A virus common to poultry is outfoxing a long-used vaccine, apparently through natural genetic engineering and by using strategies to survive environmental insults, says a University of Illinois researcher who has been tracking new outbreaks around the world. A new form of fowlpox, he said, now threatens poultry production and requires a new vaccine strategy.
  • 5/1/2001James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor writer James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor published by James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
    Surgical biopsies can be painful, and waiting for lab results unnerving. New ultrasonic sensor technology being developed at the University of Illinois may permit the rapid and accurate detection and diagnosis of cancer, without the need of a scalpel.
  • 4/1/2001Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A cat with cancer is losing weight. What's an owner - or even a veterinarian - to do?
  • 12/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Estrogen -- even in men -- may join food indulgence and lack of exercise as factors affecting obesity, researchers on two continents say.
  • 9/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    A newly revised comprehensive book on cat and dog nutrition contains more than just a cosmetic makeover.
  • 7/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Dogs whine or whimper and may become timid or aggressive. Cats may purr or growl and hide. Responses vary, but certain behaviors tell when an animal is in pain. Managing and alleviating pain is the focus of a new guidebook written by small animal specialists at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine.
  • 5/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    For a century, a tiny compartment called the volutin granule in yeast, fungi and bacteria was thought to be a storage granule with no active function. University of Illinois scientists, however, have found that the granule is really an organelle -- a live vacuole (a subcellular pouch) with a membrane and active enzymes -- and it may provide a new line of attack against malaria.
  • 3/1/2000Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor writer Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor published by Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
    Veterinary scientists have proved that an organism long suspected as the cause of feline infectious anemia (FIA) indeed is the culprit. Along the way, they have created a diagnostic tool and concluded that the bacterial organism is a mycoplasm, not a Rickkettsia.