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Veterinary Medicine News

Veterinary Medicine News

  • 4/9/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    According to the World Health Organization, more than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. And its not just humans who are packing on the pounds. Our furry companions are plagued by an obesity epidemic of their own. More than 50 percent of the dogs and cats in the United States are overweight or obese.
  • 2/27/2013Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Advancements in the use of computed tomography (also known as CT) imaging by researchers at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital are enabling them to diagnose life-threatening conditions in dogs and cats faster, dramatically affecting the course, outcomes and costs of treatment.
  • 2/4/2013Madeline Ley writer Madeline Ley by Madeline Ley published by Madeline Ley
    The Web has become a little more wild with the introduction of a website that explores human interactions with the natural world. The Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois recently created a classroom-focused website called Wildlife Encounters to educate students of all ages about the world around them.
  • 1/14/2013Chelsey Coombs writer Chelsey Coombs by Chelsey Coombs published by Chelsey Coombs
    Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD.
  • 10/24/2012Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which can cause pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and sepsis likes to share its antibiotic-defeating weaponry with its neighbors. Individual cells can pass resistance genes to one another through a process called horizontal gene transfer, or by transformation, the uptake of DNA from the environment. Now researchers report that they can interrupt the cascade of cellular events that allows S. pneumoniae to swap or suck up DNA.