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Social Science News

Social Science News

  • 10/7/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    Teens who play video/computer games 21 hours a week or more may be physically healthier and less prone to obesity as young adults than peers who spend their time on other pursuits. But gamers who log the most screen time also may be more prone to depression in young adulthood, a new study says.
  • 10/7/2014Sharita Forrest, News Editor writer Sharita Forrest, News Editor by Sharita Forrest, News Editor published by Sharita Forrest, News Editor
    Illinoisans want more trails, interest in pickleball is on the upswing, and some communities are pulling the plugs on their aging swimming pools, according to a recent survey of the organizations and municipalities that operate public recreation facilities in Illinois.
  • 10/6/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    The U.S. Census Bureau has named Julie A. Dowling, a University of Illinois professor of Latina and Latino studies, to its National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic and Other Populations.
  • 9/24/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A number of studies have suggested that religion plays a critical role in black Americans’ mental health and life satisfaction, aiding their ability to cope with personal and societal stressors. However, a new study indicates that spirituality, rather than religiosity, may be the element that is essential to black women’s psychological well-being.
  • 9/24/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A new study of nearly 600 third-graders may explain why some children who experience peer victimization develop problems with depression or aggression while other children who also get bullied have healthy emotional and social adjustment.