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Social Science News

Social Science News

  • 9/24/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A number of studies have suggested that religion plays a critical role in black Americans’ mental health and life satisfaction, aiding their ability to cope with personal and societal stressors. However, a new study indicates that spirituality, rather than religiosity, may be the element that is essential to black women’s psychological well-being.
  • 9/24/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    A new study of nearly 600 third-graders may explain why some children who experience peer victimization develop problems with depression or aggression while other children who also get bullied have healthy emotional and social adjustment.
  • 9/17/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Egypt’s 2011 revolution, described at the time as a “Facebook revolution,” made Linda Herrera a big believer in the power of social media. A past resident of Cairo who had studied the online culture of Egyptian youth and followed events through their Facebook pages, the University of Illinois education professor became, for a moment in time, a “complete cyber-optimist.”
  • 8/19/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Many of life’s problems are also civil legal problems, but people don’t see them that way. As a result, they often deal with them on their own, and rarely involve lawyers or courts, or even other third parties, according to a recent study.
  • 8/18/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor
    For some women, sexual adventures during tourist travel can be life-changing – sparking sexual fulfillment and personal growth, or potentially causing devastating health or social problems, two new studies suggest.