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Social Science News

Social Science News

  • 1/7/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    If it seems as if most terrorists are Muslims and almost all immigrant lawbreakers are Latinos, it may be because you’re watching national TV news – not because those things are true. That’s one implication of a study of five years of network and cable crime news led by University of Illinois communication professor Travis Dixon.
  • 12/22/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor
    In a review of the scholarly research that captured the most public attention online this year, three of the top 100 articles had authors from the University of Illinois.
  • 12/8/2014Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    Older Latinos living in the U.S. who perceive their neighborhoods as safer and more walkable are less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms, and the effect may be long term, a new study suggests.
  • 12/8/2014Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor writer Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor published by Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor
    A new publication, “Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death,” looks at new research into the plague and its historical significance. The publication is the inaugural issue of a new journal, “The Medieval Globe,” sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.
  • 12/8/2014Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    When the U.S. House of Representatives convenes in January, adopting rules of procedure will be among the first orders of business. Pretty mundane stuff, it would seem. Pay attention, though, says Gisela Sin, the author of a new book that analyzes over a century of House procedural rule-making, up through 2013. Those rules, written by the majority party, will have a huge impact on what follows in Washington over the next two years.