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Social Science News

Social Science News

  • 2/4/2015Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor
    A new study found Illinois educators and lawmakers have homework to do to figure out why fewer girls at the state’s high schools study subjects associated with careers in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields than their peers in other states.
  • 2/3/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    The cute cat video seems to be everywhere online, and it’s become a handy epithet for everything that journalism should not be. So what should we make of the fact that The New York Times, that paragon of journalism, has written a lot about cats over 140 years? That’s the question posed by University of Illinois journalism professor Matthew Ehrlich after compiling hundreds of cat-related tales from the Times’ digital archive.
  • 1/26/2015Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor writer Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor published by Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor
    Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of your multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as the ads you’re really watching, such as those during the Super Bowl, says a University of Illinois researcher.
  • 1/12/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Families whose children with autism spectrum disorders spend less than 20 percent of their time in mainstream classrooms are nearly twice as likely to resort to litigation, such as filing for due process hearings or mediation, when they disagree with school officials about their children’s education, according to a recent survey of parents.
  • 1/8/2015Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor
    People who have upbeat outlooks on life have significantly better cardiovascular health, suggests a new study that examined associations between optimism and heart health in more than 5,100 adults.