Teaching Strategy Resource Shelf

Four Student Misconceptions about Learning

Published Date:March 31, 2014

 Four Student Misconceptions about Learning. "Efficient and effective learning starts with a proper mindset," Stephen Chew  writes in "Helping Students to Get the Most Out of Studying." Chew continues, pointing out what most of us know firsthand, students harbor some fairly serious misconceptions that undermine their efforts to learn such as “learning is fast” and “I’m really good at multi-tasking.”  Click here to read the article.  

Published Date: March 31, 2014


Research on Student Note-taking: Implications for Faculty and Graduate Student Instructors

Published Date:March 31, 2014

Research on Student Note-taking: Implications for Faculty and Graduate Student Instructors. Research on note-taking indicates that taking notes in class and reviewing those notes (either in class or afterward) have a positive impact on student learning.  Unfortunately, students’ notes are often inaccurate or incomplete.  What can faculty do to encourage and enable more successful note-taking.  Here is the article from the U. of Michigan teaching center. 

Published Date: March 31, 2014


Unlearning: A Critical Element in the Learning Process

Published Date:March 6, 2014

Unlearning: A Critical Element in the Learning Process. Virginia Lee states that prior knowledge is arguably the single most important factor in learning. Unless we as instructors engage prior knowledge—the good, the bad, and the ugly, we risk sabotaging the new learning we work so hard to put in place and fighting the misunderstanding students continue to hold. Click here to read her article.

Published Date: March 6, 2014


Ways to Assess Students’ Prior Knowledge

Published Date:March 6, 2014

Ways to Assess Students’ Prior Knowledge. In order to gauge how much students have learned, it is not enough to assess their knowledge and skills at the end of the course or program. We also need to find out what they know coming in, that is, their prior knowledge, so that we can identify more specifically the knowledge and skills they have gained during the course or program and also to identify those misconceptions that can interfere with their new learning. Here are several techniques suggested by the teaching center at Carnegie Mellon.

Published Date: March 6, 2014


Collaboration or Plagiarism? Explaining Collaborative-Based Assignments Clearly

Published Date:February 20, 2014

Collaboration or Plagiarism? Explaining Collaborative-Based Assignments Clearly. Although there are many positive aspects of group work, there are negatives as well. One particular problem occurs when students are confused about faculty expectations involving the work product of teams. How much of the group project, if any, is individual-based vs. a group collaboration?  Here are some strategies to set expectations and clear guidelines.

 

Published Date: February 20, 2014


How to Create Memorable Lectures

Published Date:February 20, 2014

How to Create Memorable Lectures. In general, students capture only 20–40 percent of a lecture’s main ideas in their notes and retain only 10% after three weeks if they do not review their notes.  All instructors hope that their lectures will be the memorable, but these numbers present a clear challenge.  Stanford’s teaching center provides some considerations on how students attend to, make sense of, and absorb new information. Click here to read the article.

Published Date: February 20, 2014