Teaching Strategy Resource Shelf

Learning to Analyze and Critically Evaluate Ideas, Arguments, and Points of View

Published Date:November 9, 2015

Learning to Analyze and Critically Evaluate Ideas, Arguments, and Points of View. The critical evaluation of ideas, arguments, and points of view is important for the development of students as autonomous thinkers. It is only through this critical evaluation that students can distinguish among competing claims for truth and determine which arguments and points of view they can trust and those of which they should be skeptical. This article describe ways for students to develop disciplinary critical thinking.

Published Date: November 9, 2015


Thinking Creatively and Critically

Published Date:November 9, 2015

Thinking Creatively and Critically. Two popular targets on the list of Things These Students Can't Do are creative thinking (coming up with innovative ideas) and critical thinking (making judgments or choices and backing them up with evidence and logic). When our colleagues complain to us that their students can't do them, after we make appropriate sympathetic noises we ask, "Where were they supposed to learn to do it?" The answers may vary, but one we rarely hear is "In my class."  Here are some strategies from Rebecca Brent and Richard Felder.

Published Date: November 9, 2015


Note-Taking Pairs.

Published Date:October 25, 2015

Note-Taking Pairs. In Note-Taking Pairs, student partners work together to improve their individual notes.  Working with a peer provides students with an opportunity to revisit and crosscheck notes with another source. Partners help each other acquire missing information and correct inaccuracies so that their combined effort is superior to their individual notes.

Published Date: October 25, 2015


Save the Last Word for Me: Encouraging Students to Engage with Complex Reading and Each Other

Published Date:October 25, 2015

Save the Last Word for Me: Encouraging Students to Engage with Complex Reading and Each Other. Online discussions are often implemented in college classes to allow students to express their understanding and perceptions about the assigned readings. This can be challenging when the reading is particularly complex, as students are typically reluctant to share their interpretations because they are not confident in their understanding. This can inhibit meaningful interactions with peers within an online discussion. Through a review of research, we found that more structured discussions tend to exhibit higher levels of shared cognition (deNoyelles, Zydney, & Chen, 2014).  Here is the article describing the strategies.

Published Date: October 25, 2015


Collaboration or Plagiarism? Explaining Collaborative-Based Assignments Clearly

Published Date:October 12, 2015

Collaboration or Plagiarism? Explaining Collaborative-Based Assignments Clearly. Although there are many positive aspects of group work, there are negatives as well. One particular problem occurs when students are confused about faculty expectations involving the work product of teams. More specifically, students often have difficulty determining how much of a group product, if any, is to be created by an individual. Here are strategies that help clarify for the students what is acceptable collaboration.

Published Date: October 12, 2015


Exploring the Advantages of Rubrics

Published Date:October 12, 2015

Exploring the Advantages of Rubrics. "I don’t understand what you want on this assignment.” It’s a comment teachers don’t like to hear from students, and rubrics, checklists, or the grading criteria offer constructive ways to respond. They identify those parts of an assignment or performance that matter, that if included and done well garner good grades and learning. If teachers don’t identify them, then students must figure out for themselves what the assignment needs in order to be considered good. Here is an article that describes the value of using a rubric for more effective student achievement.

Published Date: October 12, 2015