Teaching Strategy Resource Shelf

First-Day Questions for the Learner-Centered Classroom

Published Date:January 26, 2016

First-Day Questions for the Learner-Centered Classroom. Why had my evaluation scores gone down while student achievement had gone up? The reason became clear as I read the written comments. The students were displeased with the greater work. They were content to ignore reading assignments, assuming that I would lecture over the content that was important. They were content not to review information and construct knowledge except by cramming the night before exams. What I needed was a way to engage them to see that how I taught the course mattered to them; that learning this way helped them accomplish goals that were important to them. Read here for strategies to help student buy-in for more active learning.

Published Date: January 26, 2016


Three Active Learning Strategies to Push Students Beyond Memorization

Published Date:January 26, 2016

Three Active Learning Strategies to Push Students Beyond Memorization. Many students come to us having achieved academic success by memorizing the content, regurgitating that information onto an exam, and promptly forgetting a good portion of it. New material builds upon the material from the previous semesters, it is critical for students to retain what they learn throughout their coursework and as they begin their careers. Here is a description about the strategies and how to implement them.

Published Date: January 26, 2016


Considerations in Designing and Teaching Your Course

Published Date:December 22, 2015

Considerations in Designing and Teaching Your Course. Take advantage of the few weeks before the semester starts to look at the course you will be teaching – whether it is a new course or one you have already taught. Many of the decisions affecting the success of a course take place well before the first day of class. Careful planning at the course design stage not only makes teaching easier and more enjoyable, it also facilitates student learning. Once your course is planned, teaching involves implementing your course design on a day-to-day level. Here is a list of things for consideration. 

Published Date: December 22, 2015


If Your Syllabus Were Graded, Would It Pass? Using a Learning-Centered Approach to Design a Course Syllabus

Published Date:December 22, 2015

If Your Syllabus Were Graded, Would It Pass? Using a Learning-Centered Approach to Design a Course Syllabus. A well-designed and thoughtful syllabus will inform the students about expectations, values, and ways to be successful. It focuses on the needs of the students and their learning processes. Read this article to learn more about how to create a learner-centered syllabus.

Published Date: December 22, 2015


Assigning Course Grades

Published Date:November 29, 2015

Assigning Course Grades. Various grading practices are used by college and university faculty. Some examples are absolute standard, relative grading, percent grading, and grading on the curve. The Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning provides an examination of the more widely used methods and discussion of the advantages, disadvantages and fallacies associated with each.

Published Date: November 29, 2015


The Last Day of Class - Make It Count

Published Date:November 29, 2015

The Last Day of Class. Make the last day count. Too often, the last day of a class can be taken up with housekeeping-information on the final, last minute details, and course evaluations. But as Richard Lyons, author of several books on college teaching says, "the final class is a key student retention milepost." Here are some activities from Berkeley’s teaching center.

Published Date: November 29, 2015