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Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive routine cancer screenings, according to new research by Xiaoling Xiang, a doctoral candidate in social work.

Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 21, 2014

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates.

Published Date: November 21, 2014


Social support may be critical to some womens weight-loss and maintenance efforts, according to a new study by (from left) graduate researcher Catherine Metzgar and professor Sharon Nickols-Richardson, both in the department of food science and human nutrition.

Social support critical to women's weight-loss efforts, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:November 5, 2014

Being accountable to another person and receiving social support may be vital in motivating some women to lose weight and keep it off, a new Illinois study says.

Published Date: November 5, 2014


University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An and his colleagues found that a majority of U.S. adults fail to meet recommended intakes of 10 key nutrients, with disabled adults faring worst.

Study: Many in U.S. have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst

Author: A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Published Date:October 23, 2014

A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Published Date: October 23, 2014


William C Sullivan and Bin Jiang Photo by L. Brian Stauffer  Viewing 3-D videos of tree-lined residential streets significantly aids in peoples recovery from stressful events, according to research by lecturer Bin Jiang (right) and professor William C. Sullivan, both in the department of landscape architecture. (Not pictured) Linda Larsen, an instructor of English, and landscape architecture graduate student Dongying Li were co-authors on a paper about the study.

Watching 3-D videos of trees helps people recover from stress, researchers say

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:October 21, 2014

Writers, outdoor enthusiasts and leaf-peeping tourists have known for centuries that nature has restorative powers that reduce feelings of stress and promote a sense of tranquility. A study led by researchers at the University of Illinois is believed to be the first study to describe a dose-response curve derived from exposure to nature.

Published Date: October 21, 2014


Postdoctoral research associate Henna Muzaffar, Extension specialist Jane Scherer and professor Karen Chapman-Novakofski  compared the efficacy of interactive and passive online media at helping teens with diabetes lead healthier lives.

Health lessons provided by interactive media easier for youth to swallow

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:September 26, 2014

Will members of the “Facebook generation” learn to eat their broccoli and take more walks if the messages come from electronic games and peers in videos instead? Researchers at the University of Illinois explored that possibility in a recent study that included more than 200 middle-school youth who were at risk for diabetes or already had the disease. The study compared the effectiveness of interactive online media with that of a passive-learning website at helping young people improve their eating and exercise habits.

Published Date: September 26, 2014