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University of Illinois chemistry professor Paul Hergenrother, left, and veterinary clinical medicine professor Tim Fan led a study of an anti-cancer compound in pet dogs that is now headed for human clinical trials.

Cancer drug tested in pet dogs is now bound for human trials

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 16, 2013

Thanks to a new $2 million investment, a drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is on the road to human clinical trials. The compound, known as PAC-1, has so far proven safe and has promising anti-cancer effects in cell culture, in mouse models of cancer and in pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphomas and osteosarcomas.

Published Date: July 16, 2013


Social work professor Venera Bekteshi has found that a bout with cancer can be the catalyst for growth and healing in mother-daughter relationships.

Cancer and treatment side effect: Stronger mother-daughter ties

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 10, 2013

A bout with cancer can be the catalyst for growth and healing in mother-daughter relationships, suggests a new study by a University of Illinois social work professor.

Published Date: July 10, 2013


University of Illinois graduate student Marc Cook, left, kinesiology and community health professor Jeffrey Woods and their colleagues found that voluntary exercise on an exercise wheel reduced colitis symptoms and  pro-inflammatory gene expression in a mouse model of colitis. Forced (moderate) running on a treadmill had the opposite effect.

Team explores the effects of exercise on ulcerative colitis

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 2, 2013

A new study indicates that aerobic exercise can lessen -- or worsen -- the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis, depending on the circumstances under which the exercise is undertaken.

Published Date: July 2, 2013


University of Illinois graduate student Neha Gothe and her colleagues found that 20 minutes of yoga significantly improved participants reaction time and accuracy in tests of cognitive function. Gothe is now a professor of kinesiology at Wayne State University in Detroit.

A 20-minute bout of yoga stimulates brain function immediately after

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 5, 2013

Researchers report that a single, 20-minute session of Hatha yoga significantly improved participants speed and accuracy on tests of working memory and inhibitory control, two measures of brain function associated with the ability to maintain focus and take in, retain and use new information. Participants performed significantly better immediately after the yoga practice than after moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise for the same amount of time.

Published Date: June 5, 2013


To suppress or to explore? Emotional strategy may influence anxiety

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 13, 2013

When trouble approaches, what do you do? Run for the hills? Hide? Pretend it isnt there? Or do you focus on the promise of rain in those looming dark clouds? New research suggests that the way you regulate your emotions, in bad times and in good, can influence whether or how much you suffer from anxiety.

Published Date: May 13, 2013