Engineering News

Chemistry professor Jeffrey Moore, graduate student Joshua Grolman and materials science and engineering professor Kristopher Kilian led a research team to create a new synthetic tissue environment for more realistic cell biology research.

New synthetic tumor environments make cancer research more realistic

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 27, 2015

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

Published Date: August 27, 2015


Groundwater from three main aquifers in the United States contributes to food shipped across the country and around the globe, says a new study from civil and environmental engineers at Illinois and Lehigh University.

Study: Groundwater from aquifers important factor in food security

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 29, 2015

Thirsty cities, fields and livestock drink deeply from aquifers, natural sources of groundwater. But a study of three of the most-tapped aquifers in the United States shows that overdrawing from these resources could lead to difficult choices affecting not only domestic food security but also international markets.

Published Date: June 29, 2015


Dr. Stephen Boppart led a team that developed a new medical imaging device that can see individual cells in the back of the eye to better diagnose and track disease.

New technology looks into the eye and brings cells into focus

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 22, 2015

Eye doctors soon could use computing power to help them see individual cells in the back of a patient’s eye, thanks to imaging technology developed by engineers at the University of Illinois. Such detailed pictures of the cells, blood vessels and nerves at the back of the eye could enable earlier diagnosis and better treatment for degenerative eye and neurological diseases.

Published Date: June 22, 2015


University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Prabuddha Mukherjee, left, bioengineering professors Rohit Bhargava and Dipanjan Pan, and postdoctoral researcher Santosh Misra report the development of a new class of carbon nanoparticles for biomedical use.

Biomedical breakthrough: Carbon nanoparticles you can make at home

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 18, 2015

Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body’s immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues.

Published Date: June 18, 2015


A device is remotely triggered to self-destruct. A radio-frequency signal turns on a heating element at the center of the device. The circuits dissolve completely.

Mission possible: This device will self-destruct when heated

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 21, 2015

University of Illinois researchers have developed heat-triggered self-destructing electronic devices, a step toward greatly reducing electronic waste and boosting sustainability in device manufacturing. They also developed a radio-controlled trigger that could remotely activate self-destruction on demand.

Published Date: May 21, 2015


Illinois chemists developed a method to make tiny silicone microspheres using misting technology found in household humidifiers. The spheres could have applications in targeted medicine and imaging.

Tiny silicone spheres come out of the mist

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 6, 2015

Technology in common household humidifiers could enable the next wave of high-tech medical imaging and targeted medicine, thanks to a new method for making tiny silicone microspheres developed by chemists at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: May 6, 2015


Electrical and computer engineering professor Joseph Lyding and graduate student Jae Won Do led a research team to develop a new method of soldering gaps between carbon nanotubes, a new type of transistor.

Electronic device performance enhanced with new transistor encasing method

Author: Austin Keating, News Bureau intern

Published Date:April 20, 2015

A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by University of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology.

Published Date: April 20, 2015


Ken Suslick led a team of Illinois chemists who developed an ultrasonic hammer to help explore how impact generates hotspots that trigger explosive materials.

Ultrasonic hammer sets off tiny explosions

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 2, 2015

Giving new meaning to the term “sonic boom,” University of Illinois chemists have used sound to trigger microscopic explosions.

Published Date: April 2, 2015


Breast tissue is computationally stained using data from infrared imaging without actually staining the tissue, enabling multiple stains on the same sample. From left, the image shows a Hematoxylin and Eosin stain (pink-blue), molecular staining for epithelial cells (brown color) and Massons trichrome(blue, red at right).

New technique paints tissue samples with light

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 24, 2015

One infrared scan can give pathologists a window into the structures and molecules inside tissues and cells, enabling fast and broad diagnostic assessments, thanks to an imaging technique developed by University of Illinois researchers and clinical partners.

Published Date: March 24, 2015


Illinois graduate student Subhro Roy (left) and professor Dan Roth developed software to help computers understand math concepts expressed in text. This will improve data accessibility, search and education.

Software teaches computers to translate words to math

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 20, 2015

Thanks to new software developed at the University of Illinois, machines now can learn to understand mathematical reasoning expressed in language, which could greatly improve search engines and access to data as well as boost mathematics education.

Published Date: January 20, 2015


Illinois emeritus professor Nick Holonyak Jr., who developed the first visible-light LED, was honored with the Draper Prize, the highest honor in engineering, along with two of his former students.

Illinois LED pioneers receive Draper Prize

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 6, 2015

A University of Illinois professor and two of his former students are among the five pioneers of LED technology honored with the 2015 Draper Prize, one of the most prestigious awards in engineering.

Published Date: January 6, 2015


Illinois professor Kyekyoon Kevin Kim, graduate student Elizabeth Joachim and research scientist Hyungsoo Choi developed tiny gelatin nanoparticles that can carry medication to the brain, which could lead to longer treatment windows for stroke patients.

Getting into your head: Gelatin nanoparticles could deliver drugs to the brain

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 23, 2014

Stroke victims could have more time to seek treatment that could reduce harmful effects on the brain, thanks to tiny blobs of gelatin that could deliver the medication to the brain noninvasively.

Published Date: December 23, 2014


Professor Tandy Warnow developed a new statistical method that sorts genetic data to construct better species trees detailing genetic lineage.

New method helps map species' genetic heritage

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 11, 2014

A new, sophisticated statistical technique developed by researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Texas at Austin can help researchers construct more accurate species trees detailing the lineage of genes and the relationships between species.

Published Date: December 11, 2014


Illinois researchers developed a platform to grow and study neuron cells using tiny rolled microtubes. Pictured, left to right: Olivia Cangellaris, Paul Froeter, professor Xiuling Li, Wen Huang and professor Martha Gillette.

Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 11, 2014

Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury.

Published Date: November 11, 2014


Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 9, 2014

When Illinois researchers set out to investigate a method to control how DNA moves through a tiny sequencing device, they did not know they were about to witness a display of molecular gymnastics.

Published Date: October 9, 2014


Civil and environmental engineering professor Praveen Kumar led research that determined bioenergy crops such as miscanthus can store more carbon in the soil than traditional corn or soybean crops.

Bioenergy crops could store more carbon in soil

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 2, 2014

In addition to providing renewable energy, grass crops like switchgrass and miscanthus could store some of the carbon they pull from the atmosphere in the soil, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: October 2, 2014


Tami Bond, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, has received a 2014 MacArthur fellowship, commonly called a 'genius grant.'

Illinois engineer wins MacArthur fellowship

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 17, 2014

Tami Bond, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship, commonly known as a “genius grant,” from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Published Date: September 17, 2014


Topography of a red blood cell as measured by the SLIM optical technique. Though the cell keeps its shape as it ages, the membrane becomes less flexible.

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 5, 2014

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: September 5, 2014


Professor Sheldon H. Jacobson led a study that found that, though seatbelt use drops as obesity rises, states with primary seatbelt laws saw a drop nearly nine times less than states without such laws.

Seatbelt laws encourage obese drivers to buckle up

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 2, 2014

Obesity is associated with many health risks, including heart disease and diabetes, but University of Illinois researchers have found a possible way to mitigate one often-overlooked risk: not buckling up in the car.

Published Date: September 2, 2014


Professor Paul Braun and graduate student Chunjie Zhang developed a continuous glucose-monitoring system that changes color when glucose levels rise.

A glucose meter of a different color provides continuous monitoring

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 25, 2014

University of Illinois engineers are bringing a touch of color to glucose monitoring. The researchers developed a new continuous glucose monitoring material that changes color as glucose levels fluctuate, and the wavelength shift is so precise that doctors and patients may be able to use it for automatic insulin dosing – something not possible using current point measurements like test strips.

Published Date: August 25, 2014


New material could enhance fast and accurate DNA sequencing

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 13, 2014

Gene-based personalized medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process.

Published Date: August 13, 2014


Professor Ning Wang led a team that found that tumor-repopulating cancer cells can go dormant in stiffer tissues but wake up and multiply when placed in a softer environment.

Cell mechanics may hold key to how cancer spreads and recurs

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 6, 2014

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed, according to new findings from researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: August 6, 2014


Illinois researchers are using plastic that shrinks when heated to pack nanowires together for electronics applications.

Shrinky Dinks close the gap for nanowires

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2014

Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Shrinky Dinks, plastic that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array to make them useful for high-performance electronics applications.

Published Date: July 1, 2014


Tiny walking bio-bots are powered by muscle cells and controlled by an electric field.

Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on command

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 30, 2014

Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.

Published Date: June 30, 2014


Professor Naira Hovakimyan was honored with a Humboldt Research Award for her work with adaptive flight control systems.

Mechanical science and engineering professor wins Humboldt Prize

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 3, 2014

University of Illinois mechanical science and engineering professor Naira Hovakimyan has been chosen to receive the prestigious Humboldt Research Award (or Humboldt Prize) honoring a career of research achievements.

Published Date: June 3, 2014


Professor Ning Wang led a team that found the precise combination of mechanical forces, chemistry and timing to help stem cells differentiate into three germ layers, the first step toward developing specialized tissues and organs.

For the first time in the lab, researchers see stem cells take initial step toward development

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 30, 2014

The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory.

Published Date: May 30, 2014


Illinois researchers have developed materials that not only heal, but regenerate. The restorative material is delivered through two, isolated fluid streams (dyed red and blue). The liquid immediately gels and later hardens, resulting in recovery of the entire damaged region. This image is halfway through the restoration process.

Regenerating plastic grows back after damage

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 8, 2014

Looking at a smooth sheet of plastic in one University of Illinois laboratory, no one would guess that an impact had recently blasted a hole through it. Illinois researchers have developed materials that not only heal, but regenerate. Until now, self-repairing materials could only bond tiny microscopic cracks. The new regenerating materials fill in large cracks and holes by regrowing material.

Published Date: May 8, 2014


Thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin incorporate commercial, off-the-shelf chip-based electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring. The new device was developed by John A. Rogers of Illinois and Yonggang Huang of Northwestern University.

Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 3, 2014

Wearing a fitness tracker on your wrist or clipped to your belt is so 2013. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin and incorporate commercial, off-the-shelf chip-based electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring.

Published Date: April 3, 2014


A close-up of an elastic polymer that was cut in two and healed overnight.

Off-the-shelf materials lead to self-healing polymers

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 4, 2014

Look out, super glue and paint thinner. Thanks to new dynamic materials developed at the University of Illinois, removable paint and self-healing plastics soon could be household products.

Published Date: February 4, 2014


Engineers developed the first tiny, synthetic machines that can swim by themselves, powered by beating heart cells.

Tiny swimming bio-bots boldly go where no bot has swum before

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 17, 2014

The alien world of aquatic micro-organisms just got new residents: synthetic self-propelled swimming bio-bots.

Published Date: January 17, 2014


Andreas C. Cangellaris, the head of the department of electrical and computer engineering at Illinois, has been chosen as the next dean of the College of Engineering.

Andreas C. Cangellaris to lead U. of I. College of Engineering

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 20, 2013

Andreas C. Cangellaris, the head of the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next dean of the College of Engineering.

Published Date: June 20, 2013


For the first time, a research team from Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated the ability to 3D-print a battery. This image shows the interlaced stack of electrodes that were printed layer by layer to create the working anode and cathode of a microbattery.

3-D printing could lead to tiny medical implants, electronics, robots, more

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 18, 2013

3-D printing now can be used to print lithium-ion microbatteries the size of a grain of sand. The printed microbatteries could supply electricity to tiny devices in fields from medicine to communications, including many that have lingered on lab benches for lack of a battery small enough to fit the device, yet providing enough stored energy to power it.

Published Date: June 18, 2013


Two U. of I. graduate students win Intel Ph.D. Fellowships

Published Date:June 14, 2013

Two graduate students at the University of Illinois have won Intel Ph.D. Fellowships for the 2013-14 academic year. Fifteen fellowships were awarded nationwide.

Published Date: June 14, 2013


LED inventor Nick Holonyak Jr., a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Illinois, is one of 101 innovators elected a charter fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

Nick Holonyak Jr. elected a charter fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 8, 2013

Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois, has been chosen to be a charter fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

Published Date: March 8, 2013


U. of I. graduate interested in high-speed rail named Luce Scholar

Published Date:February 26, 2013

University of Illinois graduate student Samantha Chadwick is among 18 young scholars nationwide to be named a Luce Scholar for 2013-2014.

Published Date: February 26, 2013


Researchers strain to improve electrical material and it's worth it

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 11, 2013

Like turning coal to diamond, adding pressure to an electrical material enhances its properties. Now, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have devised a method of making ferroelectric thin films with twice the strain, resulting in exceptional performance.

Published Date: February 11, 2013


Weng Cho Chew and Thomas J. Overbye have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

Two Illinois professors elected to National Academy of Engineering

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 7, 2013

Weng Cho Chew and Thomas J. Overbye, both professors of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

Published Date: February 7, 2013


Illinois aerospace engineering professor Scott R. White has been given a Humboldt Research Award honoring his work in autonomous and self-healing materials.

Illinois engineer receives Humboldt Research Award

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 16, 2013

University of Illinois aerospace engineering professor Scott R. White has been chosen to receive the prestigious Humboldt Research Award honoring a lifetime of research achievements.

Published Date: January 16, 2013


Nanofibers of metal oxide provide lots of highly reactive surface area for scrubbing sulfur compounds from fuel. Sulfur has to be removed because it emits toxic gasses and corrodes catalysts.

Nanofibers clean sulfur from fuel

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 17, 2012

Sulfur compounds in petroleum fuels have met their nano-structured match. University of Illinois researchers developed mats of metal oxide nanofibers that scrub sulfur from petroleum-based fuels much more effectively than traditional materials.

Published Date: December 17, 2012


Illinois researchers developed a new design paradigm for inductors. Processed while flat, they then roll up on their own, taking up much less space on a chip.

Engineers roll up their sleeves and then do same with inductors

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 13, 2012

On the road to smaller, high-performance electronics, University of Illinois researchers have smoothed one speed bump by shrinking a key, yet notoriously large element of integrated circuits.

Published Date: December 13, 2012


Civil and environmental engineering professor Tami Bond and colleagues say that reducing the use of kerosene lamps is a quick way to reduce global warming.

The dark side of kerosene lamps: High black carbon emissions

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 10, 2012

The small kerosene lamps that light millions of homes in developing countries have a dark side: black carbon fine particles of soot released into the atmosphere.

Published Date: December 10, 2012


Ken Choquette, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, is one of six Illinois professors named AAAS fellows.

Six professors at Illinois named 2012 AAAS fellows

Author: Chelsey Coombs

Published Date:November 29, 2012

Six faculty members at the University of Illinois have been named 2012 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science: animal biology professor Chi-Hing Christina Cheng, electrical and computer engineering professor Kent Choquette, psychology professor Neal Cohen, chemistry professor So Hirata, anthropology professor Lisa Lucero and physics professor Philip Phillips.

Published Date: November 29, 2012


Researchers from the University of Illinois  professor Sua Myong, left, and graduate student Helen Hwang  determined the action of proteins that regulate the caps on the ends of DNA strands, creating an assay that could be used to screen anti-cancer drugs.

Proteins that work at the end of DNA could provide cancer insight

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 29, 2012

New insights into a protein complex that regulates the very tips of chromosomes could improve methods of screening anti-cancer drugs.

Published Date: November 29, 2012


Jonathan Naber, left, and Adam Booher fit the first amputee patient with one of three prototypes Illini Prosthetic Technologies tested on a trip to Guatemala in July 2010.

U. of I. alumnus named Marshall Scholar

Published Date:November 26, 2012

Jonathan Naber, of Waterloo, Ill., has been awarded a Marshall Scholarship. Each year, about 40 students from the United States are selected as Marshall Scholars for postgraduate study at a university in the United Kingdom.

Published Date: November 26, 2012


Researchers from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University demonstrated tiny spheres that synchronize their movements as they self-assemble into a spinning microtube. From left, Erik Luijten, Jing Yan, Steve Granick and Sung Chul Bae.

New structures self-assemble in synchronized dance

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 21, 2012

With self-assembly guiding the steps and synchronization providing the rhythm, a new class of materials forms dynamic, moving structures in an intricate dance.

Published Date: November 21, 2012


A three-dimensional image of an etched gallium-arsenide semiconductor, taken during etching with a new microscopy technique that monitors the etching process on the nanometer scale. The height difference between the orange and purple regions is approximately 250 nanometers.

New method monitors semiconductor etching as it happens with light

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 28, 2012

University of Illinois researchers have a new low-cost method to carve delicate features onto semiconductor wafers using light and watch as it happens.

Published Date: September 28, 2012


A biodegradable integrated circuit during dissolution in water

Next up: Environmentally safe electronics that also vanish in the body

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 27, 2012

Physicians and environmentalists alike could soon be using a new class of electronic devices: small, robust and high performance, yet also biocompatible and capable of dissolving completely in water or in bodily fluids.

Published Date: September 27, 2012


Oblique aerial photograph of a dune field in the Bonnet Carr Spillway. Sand deposits were worked into trains of dunes when flood water flowed in the spillway. Once the flood subsided and the spillway was closed, the water drained and dried from the spillway, thereby exposing the dunes. Trees and shrubs near the top of the photograph provide scale.



Spillways can divert sand from river to rebuild wetlands

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 24, 2012

Researchers could have a new method to rebuild wetlands of the Louisiana delta, thanks to a chance finding while monitoring severe flooding of the Mississippi River.

Published Date: July 24, 2012


Joseph Lyding, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois, led a group that developed a new microscope probe-sharpening technique.

Microscope probe-sharpening technique improves resolution, durability

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 5, 2012

A simple new improvement to an essential microscope component could greatly improve imaging for researchers who study the very small, from cells to computer chips.

Published Date: July 5, 2012


Professor Min-Feng Yus group developed trolling AFM, a method for high-quality imaging of soft cells and tissues at atomic resolution.

Gone fishing: Researchers' imaging technique trolls in quiet cellular seas

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 14, 2012

Experienced anglers know that choppy waters make for difficult fishing, so they try not to rock the boat. Thanks to a new microscopy technique, cell biology researchers can heed that same advice. University of Illinois researchers developed a method they call trolling AFM, which allows them to study soft biological samples in liquid with high resolution and high quality.

Published Date: June 14, 2012


Alumnus wins fellowship, will work on prosthesis project in Guatemala

Author: Madeline Ley

Published Date:June 13, 2012

A recent University of Illinois graduate has received a Whitaker International Fellow Grant to fund overseas bioengineering research during the 2012-13 academic year.

Published Date: June 13, 2012


In many developing countries, food is cooked over traditional biomass-burning cookstoves. Illinois researchers found that how users operate their stoves has a big effect on emissions.

Study finds emissions from widely used cookstoves vary with use

Author: Liz Ahlberg

Published Date:May 29, 2012

The smoke rising from a cookstove fills the air with the tantalizing aroma of dinner and a cloud of pollutants and particles that threaten both health and the environment. How families in developing countries use their cookstoves has a big effect on emissions from those stoves, and laboratory emission tests dont accurately reflect real-world operations, according to a study by University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: May 29, 2012


Illinois professor elected to National Academy of Engineering

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 9, 2012

Photonics pioneer James J. Coleman has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering. Coleman is the Intel Alumni Endowed Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: February 9, 2012


Particle-free silver ink prints small, high-performance electronics

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 12, 2012

University of Illinois materials scientists have developed a new reactive silver ink for printing high-performance electronics on ubiquitous, low-cost materials such as flexible plastic, paper or fabric substrates.

Published Date: January 12, 2012


New technique makes it easier to etch semiconductors

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 22, 2011

Creating semiconductor structures for high-end optoelectronic devices just got easier, thanks to University of Illinois researchers. The team developed a method to chemically etch patterned arrays in the semiconductor gallium arsenide, used in solar cells, lasers, light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs), capacitors and sensors.

Published Date: December 22, 2011


University of Illinois professors, from left, Nancy Sottos, Scott White and Jeffrey Moore applied their experience in self-healing polymers to electrical systems, developing technology that could extend the longevity of electronic devices and batteries.

Self-healing electronics could work longer and reduce waste

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 20, 2011

When one tiny circuit within an integrated chip cracks or fails, the whole chip -- or even the whole device -- is a loss. But what if it could fix itself, and fix itself so fast that the user never knew there was a problem?

Published Date: December 20, 2011


Illinois researchers developed spiral polypeptides that can deliver DNA segments to cells with high efficiency and relatively low toxicity, a step toward clinical gene therapy. The team, from left, postdoctoral researchers Lichen Yin and Dong Li; Fei Wang, a professor of cell and developmental biology; Jianjun Cheng, a professor of materials science and engineering; and Nathan Gabrielson, a postdoctoral researcher.

Let's do the twist: Spiral proteins are efficient gene delivery agents

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 15, 2011

Clinical gene therapy may be one step closer, thanks to a new twist on an old class of molecules.

Published Date: December 15, 2011


Researchers at Illinois have developed a microvascular stamp that lays out a blueprint for new blood vessels and spurs their growth in a predetermined pattern. The research team included (from left, standing) Rashid Bashir, a professor of electrical and computer engineering; graduate student Vincent Chan; K. Jimmy Hsia, a professor of mechanical science and engineering; graduate student Casey Dyck; and Hyunjoon Kong, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering; and (from left, seated) postdoctoral researcher Jae Hyun Jeong and graduate student Chaenyung Cha.

Team designs a bandage that spurs, guides blood vessel growth

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 15, 2011

Researchers have developed a bandage that stimulates and directs blood vessel growth on the surface of a wound. The bandage, called a microvascular stamp, contains living cells that deliver growth factors to damaged tissues in a defined pattern. After a week, the pattern of the stamp is written in blood vessels, the researchers report.

Published Date: December 15, 2011


Nanowires could be solution for high- performance solar cells

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 8, 2011

Tiny wires could help engineers realize high-performance solar cells and other electronics, according to University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: November 8, 2011


Professors Joseph Lyding, left; and Eric Pop, center; and graduate student Josh Wood identified copper crystal structures that work best for growing high-quality graphene.

Research: Graphene grows better on certain copper crystals

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 27, 2011

New observations could improve industrial production of high-quality graphene, hastening the era of graphene-based consumer electronics, thanks to University of Illinois engineers.

Published Date: October 27, 2011


Illinois professor named Packard Fellow

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 24, 2011

University of Illinois chemical and biomolecular engineering professor Charles Schroeder has been named a Packard Fellow in science and engineering. He is among 16 early career researchers honored by the David and Lucille Packard Foundation in 2011 for outstanding creative research.

Published Date: October 24, 2011


Packaging expert sees a social revolution in the evolving barcode

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 13, 2011

What if you could trace the history of everything you buy back to its origins? Using your smart phone camera, you could learn what factory made the ingredients in your heart medication, what country grew the corn in your breakfast cereal, or even how to recycle the phone. You could follow the whole life cycle of a product and everyone who handled it along the way to ensure that the medicine youre taking isnt counterfeit and the food youre eating is safe.

Published Date: October 13, 2011


Ionic liquid catalyst helps turn emissions into fuel

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 6, 2011

An Illinois research team has succeeded in overcoming one major obstacle to a promising technology that simultaneously reduces atmospheric carbon dioxide and produces fuel.

Published Date: October 6, 2011


New sensors streamline detection of estrogenic compounds

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 25, 2011

Researchers have engineered new sensors that fluoresce in the presence of compounds that interact with estrogen receptors in human cells. The sensors detect natural or human-made substances that alter estrogenic signaling in the body.

Published Date: August 25, 2011


New theory may shed light on dynamics of large-polymer liquids

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 23, 2011

A new physics-based theory could give researchers a deeper understanding of the unusual, slow dynamics of liquids composed of large polymers. This advance provides a better picture of how polymer molecules respond under fast-flow, high-stress processing conditions for plastics and other polymeric materials.

Published Date: August 23, 2011


Smart skin: Electronics that stick, stretch like a temporary tattoo

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 11, 2011

Engineers have developed a device platform that combines electronic components for sensing, medical diagnostics, communications and human-machine interfaces, all on an ultrathin skin-like patch that mounts directly onto the skin with the ease, flexibility and comfort of a temporary tattoo.

Published Date: August 11, 2011


New 3-D photonic crystals have both electronic and optical properties

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 25, 2011

In an advance that could open new avenues for solar cells, lasers, metamaterials and more, researchers at the University of Illinois have demonstrated the first optoelectronically active 3-D photonic crystal.

Published Date: July 25, 2011


Silver pen has the write stuff for flexible electronics

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 28, 2011

The pen may have bested the sword long ago, but now its challenging wires and soldering irons.

Published Date: June 28, 2011


Self-cooling observed in graphene electronics

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 4, 2011

With the first observation of thermoelectric effects at graphene contacts, University of Illinois researchers found that graphene transistors have a nanoscale cooling effect that reduces their temperature.

Published Date: April 4, 2011


New technology would dramatically extend battery life for mobile devices

Published Date:March 10, 2011

Technophiles who have been dreaming of mobile devices that run longer on lighter, slimmer batteries may soon find their wish has been granted.

Published Date: March 10, 2011


Stretchable balloon electronics get to the heart of cardiac medicine

Author: Liz Ahlberg

Published Date:March 7, 2011

Cardiologists may soon be able to place sensitive electronics inside their patients hearts with minimal invasiveness, enabling more sophisticated and efficient diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias.

Published Date: March 7, 2011


John A. Rogers elected to National Academy of Engineering

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 8, 2011

John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder Chair in Engineering at the University of Illinois, is among the 68 new members elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

Published Date: February 8, 2011


Self-assembling structures open door to new class of materials

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 13, 2011

Researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have demonstrated bio-inspired structures that self-assemble from simple building blocks: spheres.

Published Date: January 13, 2011


Study estimates land available for biofuel crops

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 10, 2011

Using detailed land analysis, Illinois researchers have found that biofuel crops cultivated on available land could produce up to half of the worlds current fuel consumption without affecting food crops or pastureland.

Published Date: January 10, 2011


Newly developed cloak hides underwater objects from sonar

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 5, 2011

In one University of Illinois lab, invisibility is a matter of now you hear it, now you dont. Led by mechanical science and engineering professor Nicholas Fang, Illinois researchers have demonstrated an acoustic cloak, a technology that renders underwater objects invisible to sonar and other ultrasound waves.

Published Date: January 5, 2011


Pediatric vaccine stockpile policies need to be revisited, researcher says

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:September 9, 2010

Vaccine manufacturers and public health decision-makers need to collaborate in a more efficient and effective manner not only to reduce the likelihood of supply shortages for pediatric vaccines but also to maximize community immunity, says Sheldon H. Jacobson, a University of Illinois researcher who specializes in statistics and data analysis.

Published Date: September 9, 2010


Cell-phone bans while driving have more impact in dense, urban areas

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:February 8, 2010

A new study analyzing the impact of hand-held cell phone legislation on driving safety concludes that usage-ban laws had more of an impact in densely populated urban areas with a higher number of licensed drivers than in rural areas where there are fewer licensed drivers, according to a University of Illinois researcher.

Published Date: February 8, 2010


The team that discovered that small mechanical forces have a big impact on embryonic stem cells were led by, from left, Fei Wang, professor of cell and developmental biology; Farhan Chowdhury, doctoral student in mechanical science and engineering: Ning Wang, professor of mechanical science and engineering; and Tetsuya Tanaka, professor of animal sciences.

Small mechanical forces have big impact on embryonic stem cells

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 19, 2009

Applying a small mechanical force to embryonic stem cells could be a new way of coaxing them into a specific direction of differentiation, researchers at the University of Illinois report. Applications for force-directed cell differentiation include therapeutic cloning and regenerative medicine.

Published Date: October 19, 2009


U. of I. team is top U.S. finisher in Solar Decathlon competition

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:October 16, 2009

A team of students from the University of Illinois won second place today (Oct. 16) in the 2009 Solar Decathlon design competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Published Date: October 16, 2009


Ultrathin LEDs create new classes of lighting

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 20, 2009

A new process for creating ultrathin, ultrasmall inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and assembling them into large arrays offers new classes of lighting and display systems with interesting properties, such as see-through construction and mechanical flexibility, that would be impossible to achieve with existing technologies.

Published Date: August 20, 2009


Rethinking Brownian motion with the emperor's new clothes

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 27, 2009

Researchers at the University of Illinois have now revealed the naked truth about a classic bell-shaped curve used to describe the motion of a liquid as it diffuses through another material.

Published Date: July 27, 2009


High-speed signal mixer demonstrates capabilities of transistor laser

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 19, 2009

Scientists at the University of Illinois have successfully demonstrated a microwave signal mixer made from a tunnel-junction transistor laser. Development of the device brings researchers a big step closer to higher speed electronics and higher performance electrical and optical integrated circuits.

Published Date: March 19, 2009


New imaging technique reveals the atomic structure of nanocrystals

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 18, 2009

A new imaging technique developed by researchers at the University of Illinois overcomes the limit of diffraction and can reveal the atomic structure of a single nanocrystal with a resolution of less than one angstrom (less than one hundredth-millionth of a centimeter).

Published Date: February 18, 2009


Scientists prove graphene's edge structure affects electronic properties

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 16, 2009

Graphene, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon, holds remarkable promise for future nanoelectronics applications. Whether graphene actually cuts it in industry, however, depends upon how graphene is cut, say researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: February 16, 2009


New silver-based ink has applications in printed electronics

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 12, 2009

A new ink, developed by researchers at Illinois, is composed of silver nanoparticles and can be used in electronic and optoelectronic applications to create flexible, stretchable and spanning microelectrodes that carry signals from one circuit element to another.

Published Date: February 12, 2009


Carbon nanotube avalanche process nearly doubles current

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 9, 2009

By pushing carbon nanotubes close to their breaking point, researchers at the University of Illinois have demonstrated a remarkable increase in the current-carrying capacity of the nanotubes, well beyond what was previously thought possible.

Published Date: February 9, 2009


New plasma transistor could create sharper displays

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 4, 2009

By integrating a solid-state electron emitter and a microcavity plasma device, researchers at the University of Illinois have created a plasma transistor that could be used to make lighter, less expensive and higher resolution flat-panel displays.

Published Date: February 4, 2009


Lack of thermoelectric effect is cool feature in carbon nanotubes

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 13, 2009

Recent experiments have shown the absence of the thermoelectric effect in metallic carbon nanotubes. Building upon earlier theoretical work, researchers at the University of Illinois say they can explain this peculiar behavior, and put it to good use.

Published Date: January 13, 2009


With increasing obesity, fuel consumption becomes weighty matter

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 16, 2008

Excess fuel consumption caused by excess driver and passenger weight has increased in the past two years, with no end in sight.

Published Date: December 16, 2008


New polymer coatings prevent corrosion, even when scratched

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 9, 2008

Imagine tiny cracks in your patio table healing by themselves, or the first small scratch on your new car disappearing by itself. This and more may be possible with self-healing coatings being developed at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: December 9, 2008


Researchers develop better membranes for water treatment, drug delivery

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 29, 2007

Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new generation of biomimetic membranes for water treatment and drug delivery. The highly permeable and selective membranes are based on the incorporation of the functional water channel protein Aquaporin Z into a novel A-B-A triblock copolymer.

Published Date: November 29, 2007


Catalyst-free chemistry makes self-healing materials more practical

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 27, 2007

A new catalyst-free, self-healing material system developed by researchers at the University of Illinois offers a far less expensive and far more practical way to repair composite materials used in structural applications ranging from airplane fuselages to wind-farm propeller blades.

Published Date: November 27, 2007


Study looking at lighter, cooler equipment to reduce firefighter injuries, deaths

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 26, 2007

Firefighters battling wildfires like those devastating Southern California, or even a smaller structural fire, have to endure temperatures in the hundreds of degrees. A study at the Illinois Fire Service Institute on the U. of I.'s Urbana campus is examining an enhanced version of personal protective equipment that is lighter, less restrictive and uses a firefighter's exhaled breath to cool the body and help combat heat stress, which researchers believe contributes to many of the on-the-job deaths and injuries firefighters suffer each year.

Published Date: October 26, 2007


Sol-gel inks produce complex shapes with nanoscale features

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 11, 2007

New sol-gel inks developed by researchers at the University of Illinois can be printed into patterns to produce three-dimensional structures of metal oxides with nanoscale features.

Published Date: October 11, 2007


Physics conference to celebrate 50 years of superconductivity theory

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 3, 2007

It's been hailed as one of the greatest discoveries in theoretical physics in the 20th century - a theory that has influenced essentially all areas of physics, from the structure of atomic nuclei to the cores of neutron stars. And it was developed by University of Illinois physicist John Bardeen, postdoctoral research associate Leon Cooper and graduate student J. Robert Schrieffer 50 years ago.

Published Date: October 3, 2007


Physics building designated site of historic significance by APS

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 2, 2007

To commemorate the pioneering work of University of Illinois researchers in understanding the mechanism of superconductivity, the American Physical Society is designating the old Physics Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, as a site of historic significance to physics.

Published Date: October 2, 2007


Nanowire generates power by harvesting energy from the environment

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 27, 2007

As the sizes of sensor networks and mobile devices shrink toward the microscale, and even nanoscale, there is a growing need for suitable power sources. Because even the tiniest battery is too big to be used in nanoscale devices, scientists are exploring nanosize systems that can salvage energy from the environment.

Published Date: September 27, 2007


Researchers set new record for brightness of quantum dots

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 25, 2007

By placing quantum dots on a specially designed photonic crystal, researchers at the University of Illinois have demonstrated enhanced fluorescence intensity by a factor of up to 108. Potential applications include high-brightness light-emitting diodes, optical switches and personalized, high-sensitivity biosensors.

Published Date: September 25, 2007


Lighter gas reduces damage to optics in extreme ultraviolet lithography

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 12, 2007

Researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered a way to generate light and reduce damage in a leading candidate for next-generation microelectronics lithography. The technique could help pack more power into smaller computer chips.

Published Date: September 12, 2007


Improved e-jet printing provides higher resolution and more versatility

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 6, 2007

By combining electrically induced fluid flow with nanoscale nozzles, researchers at the University of Illinois have established new benchmarks for precision control and resolution in jet-printing processes.

Published Date: September 6, 2007


Ultrafast laser spectrometer measures heat flow through molecules

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 9, 2007

Global warming isn't the only heat scientists are feeling. Another area in which heat flow is becoming crucial is the field of molecular electronics, where long-chain molecules attached to tiny electrodes are used to transport and switch electrons.

Published Date: August 9, 2007


Semiconductor membrane mimics biological behavior of ion channels

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 12, 2007

A semiconductor membrane designed by researchers at the University of Illinois could offer more flexibility and better electrical performance than biological membranes. Built from thin silicon layers doped with different impurities, the solid-state membrane also could be used in applications such as single-molecule detection, protein filtering and DNA sequencing.

Published Date: July 12, 2007


Now, self-healing materials can mimic human skin, healing again and again

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 11, 2007

The next generation of self-healing materials, invented by researchers at the University of Illinois, mimics human skin by healing itself time after time. The new materials rely upon embedded, three-dimensional microvascular networks that emulate biological circulatory systems.

Published Date: June 11, 2007


Aluminum foil lamps outshine incandescent lights

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 4, 2007

Researchers at the University of Illinois are developing panels of microcavity plasma lamps that may soon brighten people's lives. The thin, lightweight panels could be used for residential and commercial lighting, and for certain types of biomedical applications.

Published Date: June 4, 2007


Inverse woodpile structure has extremely large photonic band gap

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 21, 2007

As many homeowners know, when stacking firewood, pieces should be placed close enough to permit passage of a mouse, but not of a cat chasing the mouse.

Published Date: May 21, 2007


Theory predicts aging process in DVDs, Plexiglas, other polymer glasses

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 23, 2007

Polymer glasses are versatile plastics widely used in applications ranging from aircraft windshields to DVDs. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a theory that predicts how these materials age. The theory also explains why motions at the molecular level can have macroscopic consequences.

Published Date: April 23, 2007


Technique creates metal memory and could lead to vanishing dents

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 29, 2007

Crumpled kitchen foil that lays flat for reuse. Bent bumpers that straighten overnight. Dents in car doors that disappear when heated with a hairdryer. These and other physical feats may become possible with a technique to make memory metals discovered by researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: March 29, 2007


Miniature chain-mail fabric holds promise for smart textiles

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 28, 2007

Scientists at the University of Illinois have fabricated the world's smallest chain-mail fabric. Combined with existing processing techniques, the flexible, metallic fabric holds promise for fully engineered smart textiles.

Published Date: March 28, 2007


Linear arrays of nanotubes offer path to high-performance electronics

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 26, 2007

Despite the attractive electrical properties and physical features of single-walled carbon nanotubes, incorporating them into scalable integrated circuits has proven to be a challenge because of difficulties in manipulating and positioning these molecular scale objects and in achieving sufficient current outputs.

Published Date: March 26, 2007


Super small nanoelectrodes can probe microscale environments

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 9, 2007

Investigating the composition and behavior of microscale environments, including those within living cells, could become easier and more precise with nanoelectrodes being developed at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: March 9, 2007


Biologically inspired sensors can augment sonar, vision system in submarines

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 21, 2007

To find prey and avoid being preyed upon, fish rely on a row of specialized sensory organs along the sides of their bodies, called the lateral line. Now, a research team led by Chang Liu at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has built an artificial lateral line that can provide the same functions in underwater vehicles.

Published Date: February 21, 2007


New stamping process creates metallic interconnects, nanostructures

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 21, 2007

Creating high-resolution metallic interconnects is an essential part of the fabrication of microchips and other nanoscale devices. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a simple and robust electrochemical process for the direct patterning of metallic interconnects and other nanostructures.

Published Date: February 21, 2007


Novel computed imaging technique uses blurry images to enhance view

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 22, 2007

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a novel computational image-forming technique for optical microscopy that can produce crisp, three-dimensional images from blurry, out-of-focus data.

Published Date: January 22, 2007


Water theory is watertight, researchers say

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 17, 2007

There may be tiny bubbles in the wine, but not at the interface between water and a waxy coating on glass, a new study shows.

Published Date: January 17, 2007


New instrumentation helps scientists better predict space weather

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 11, 2006

New instrumentation and observing techniques, being developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are helping scientists better understand and predict space weather.

Published Date: December 11, 2006


World's fastest transistor approaches goal of terahertz device

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 11, 2006

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have again broken their own speed record for the world's fastest transistor. With a frequency of 845 gigahertz, their latest device is approximately 300 gigahertz faster than transistors built by other research groups, and approaches the goal of a terahertz device.

Published Date: December 11, 2006


Ceramic microreactors developed for on-site hydrogen production

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 19, 2006

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have designed and built ceramic microreactors for the on-site reforming of hydrocarbon fuels, such as propane, into hydrogen for use in fuel cells and other portable power sources.

Published Date: September 19, 2006


Near-infrared imaging helps doctors detect, treat breast cancer

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 12, 2006

A near-infrared imaging technique being developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign could have a significant impact in the way doctors detect, diagnose and treat breast cancer.

Published Date: September 12, 2006


Solar energy viable in Illinois under right conditions, data indicate

Author: Eva Kingston, Illinois State Water Survey

Published Date:September 7, 2006

Although costs for photovoltaic technology are too high now in comparison with power supplied by traditional utilities, the potential to make solar power economically feasible exists on a smaller scale, according to data released today by the Illinois State Water Survey and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: September 7, 2006


Mathematician uses topology to study abstract spaces, solve problems

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 15, 2006

Studying complex systems, such as the movement of robots on a factory floor, the motion of air over a wing, or the effectiveness of a security network, can present huge challenges. Mathematician Robert Ghrist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing advanced mathematical tools to simplify such tasks.

Published Date: August 15, 2006


Transmission congestion threatens to clog nation's power grid

Author: Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:July 27, 2006

Inadequate investment in the power grid transmission network remains the Achilles heel of the nation's electric system, an engineer who specializes in utility policy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.

Published Date: July 27, 2006


Software tools detect bugs by inferring programmer's intentions

Author: James Kloeppel, Science Editor

Published Date:July 6, 2006

The task of debugging huge computer programs can be made faster and easier by using new software tools developed by programming experts at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: July 6, 2006


Researchers build an ultrasound version of the laser

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 8, 2006

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at the University of Missouri-Rolla have built an ultrasound analogue of the laser.

Published Date: June 8, 2006


Illinois researchers produce two most important scientific papers

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 31, 2006

Two of the five most important papers published in the 43-year history of the journal Applied Physics Letters were written by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: May 31, 2006


Software allows neighbors to improve Internet access at no extra cost

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 27, 2006

Computer scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed software that enables the sharing of high-speed Internet connections without compromising security or privacy. The software can improve Internet connectivity in residential areas at no additional cost.

Published Date: April 27, 2006


New video-conferencing method cheaper, more sophisticated, developers say

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:April 19, 2006

If only Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were around today to take a spin with new technology being developed and tested by a team of computer scientists in Illinois and California.

Published Date: April 19, 2006


$1.5 billion needed to ensure 12-month stockpile of pediatric vaccines

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 18, 2006

A six-month stockpile of recommended pediatric vaccines would cost $1 billion and could cover more than 90 percent of U.S. children during a six-month interruption in production, say researchers at two Illinois universities.

Published Date: April 18, 2006


Hidden structure revealed in characteristics of transistor laser

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 5, 2006

The transistor laser, invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been full of surprises. Researchers recently coaxed the device to reveal fundamental properties of the transistor, and of the transistor laser, moving it a step closer to commercialization.

Published Date: April 5, 2006


Researchers simulate complete structure of virus-on computer

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 14, 2006

When Boeing and Airbus developed their latest aircraft, the companies' engineers designed and tested them on a computer long before the planes were built. Biologists are catching on. They've just completed the first computer simulation of an entire life form - a virus.

Published Date: March 14, 2006


Quantum computer solves problem, without running

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 22, 2006

By combining quantum computation and quantum interrogation, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found an exotic way of determining an answer to an algorithm - without ever running the algorithm.

Published Date: February 22, 2006


Detection of DNA on nanotubes offers new sensing, sequencing technologies

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 17, 2006

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who recently reported that DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes could serve as sensors in living cells now say the tiny tubes can be used to target specific DNA sequences. Potential applications for the new sensors range from rapid detection of hazardous biological agents to simpler and more efficient forensic identification.

Published Date: February 17, 2006


Wrinkled membranes create novel drug-delivery system

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 13, 2006

A University of Illinois scientist studying how membranes wrinkle has discovered a novel system for on-demand drug delivery.

Published Date: February 13, 2006


Transistor laser functions as non-linear electronic switch, processor

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 6, 2006

The transistor laser invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has now been found to possess fundamental non-linear characteristics that are new to a transistor and permit its use as a dual-input, dual-output, high-frequency signal processor.

Published Date: February 6, 2006


New theory explains electronic and thermal behavior of nanotubes

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 19, 2006

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have made an important theoretical breakthrough in the understanding of energy dissipation and thermal breakdown in metallic carbon nanotubes. Their discovery will help move nanotube wires from laboratory to marketplace.

Published Date: January 19, 2006


Stretchable silicon could be next wave in electronics

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 15, 2005

The next wave in electronics could be wavy electronics.

Published Date: December 15, 2005


Shredded tires a cheap, environmentally friendly way to cover landfills

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 28, 2005

Placing shredded tires on top of - rather than in - landfills can save money and benefit the environment, researchers from the University of Illinois say.

Published Date: September 28, 2005


Room-temperature transistor laser is step closer to commercialization

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 26, 2005

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated the room-temperature operation of a heterojunction bipolar transistor laser, moving it an important step closer to commercialization. The scientists describe their work in the Sept. 26 issue of the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Published Date: September 26, 2005


New center at Illinois will examine how to safeguard nation's power grid

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 15, 2005

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will be the home of a national center that will address the challenge of how to protect the nation's power grid, the National Science Foundation announced today. The NSF has awarded $7.5 million over five years to the project, which will be led by the U. of I. and also involve researchers at Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and Washington State University. The Department of Energy and the Department of Homeland Security have pledged to join NSF in funding and managing the effort.

Published Date: August 15, 2005


Governors' pact on electricity transmission a sensible step, expert says

Author: Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:July 28, 2005

An agreement by Midwest governors to coordinate policies for electric transmission lines is a positive move to improve the reliability of the electric supply system, a University of Illinois energy expert says.

Published Date: July 28, 2005


Macromolecules on surface control mobility in phospholipid bilayers

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 20, 2005

Phospholipid bilayers serve as the framework in biological membranes in which other components are embedded. Fundamental not only in biology, lipid bilayers are also essential in applications such as biosensors and nanoreactors.

Published Date: June 20, 2005


Thin films of silicon nanoparticles roll into flexible nanotubes

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 14, 2005

By depositing nanoparticles onto a charged surface, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have crafted nanotubes from silicon that are flexible and nearly as soft as rubber.

Published Date: June 14, 2005


Flexible tactile sensors could help robots work better

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 19, 2005

A robot's sensitivity to touch could be vastly improved by an array of polymer-based tactile sensors that has been combined with a robust signal-processing algorithm to classify surface textures. The work, performed by a team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is an essential step in the development of robots that can identify and manipulate objects in unstructured environments.

Published Date: May 19, 2005


Synergistic SuperGrid for transporting energy moves closer to reality

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 18, 2005

The concept of a high-capacity superconducting energy pipeline, or SuperGrid, moved closer to reality when experts from industry, government and academia attended a recent workshop at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: April 18, 2005


New material structure produces world's fastest transistor

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 11, 2005

A new type of transistor structure, invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has broken the 600 gigahertz speed barrier. The goal of a terahertz transistor for high-speed computing and communications applications could now be within reach.

Published Date: April 11, 2005


Improved dielectric developed for chip-level copper circuitry

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 28, 2005

A new dielectric material, developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, could facilitate the use of copper circuitry at the chip level. The thermally stable aromatic polymer has a low dielectric constant of 1.85, good mechanical properties and excellent adhesion.

Published Date: March 28, 2005


Insects, viruses could hold key for better human teamwork in disasters

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2005

In a new and novel study, scientists are looking to nature - specifically, to ants, bees and viruses - for ways to improve human collaboration during disaster relief efforts.

Published Date: March 1, 2005


High-fidelity patterns form spontaneously when solvent evaporates

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 28, 2005

Resembling neatly stacked rows of driftwood abandoned by receding tides, particles left by a confined, evaporating droplet can create beautiful and complex patterns. The natural, pattern-forming process could find use in fields such as nanotechnology and optoelectronics.

Published Date: February 28, 2005


Portable sampling cart monitors emissions from wood-burning cookstoves

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 13, 2004

A new method of measuring emissions from cookstoves could help improve human health and enhance the accuracy of global climate models.

Published Date: December 13, 2004


New transistor laser could lead to faster signal processing

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 15, 2004

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated the laser operation of a heterojunction bipolar light-emitting transistor. The scientists describe the fabrication and operation of their transistor laser in the Nov. 15 issue of the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Published Date: November 15, 2004


Colloidal adsorbent removes natural organic matter from water supply

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 24, 2004

Microbial degradation products and other forms of natural organic matter can make water look, smell and taste bad. Natural organic matter also can foul the membranes used in water treatment plants, significantly reducing their efficiency.

Published Date: August 24, 2004


Low-cost fibers remove trace atrazine from drinking water

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 23, 2004

A new generation of high surface-area porous materials for removing atrazine from water supplies has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The low-cost and wear-resistant fibers also can remove the hazardous contaminants chloroform and trichloroethylene, both byproducts of the commonly used chlorine disinfection process.

Published Date: August 23, 2004


University to decommission research reactor

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 5, 2004

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has begun the process of decommissioning its nuclear research reactor. The process will take several years to complete and will be carried out under the scrutiny of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Published Date: August 5, 2004


Production of high-fidelity entangled photons exceeds 1 million per second

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 15, 2004

Like virtuosos tuning their violins, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have tuned their instruments and harmonized the production of entangled photons, pushing rates to more than 1 million pairs per second.

Published Date: July 15, 2004


DARPA funds new photonic research center at Illinois

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 21, 2004

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to create a photonic research center to develop ultra-fast light sources for high-speed signal processing and optical communications systems. The grant will provide $6.2 million in funding over four years.

Published Date: June 21, 2004


Printable silicon for ultrahigh performance flexible electronic systems

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 17, 2004

By carving specks of single crystal silicon from a bulk wafer and casting them onto sheets of plastic, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a route to ultrahigh performance, mechanically flexible thin-film transistors. The process could enable new applications in consumer electronics - such as inexpensive wall-to-wall displays and intelligent but disposable radio frequency identification tags - and could even be used in applications that require significant computing power.

Published Date: June 17, 2004


Nation remains vulnerable to power blackouts, thanks to political impasse

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:June 4, 2004

As the peak electricity season approaches, little has been done in Washington to prevent a recurrence of last August's power failure that produced a huge blackout in the Northeast, an expert at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.

Published Date: June 4, 2004


Like ozone hole, polar clouds take bite out of meteoric iron

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 15, 2004

Polar clouds are known to play a major role in the destruction of Earth's protective ozone layer, creating the springtime "ozone hole" above Antarctica. Now, scientists have found that polar clouds also play a significant role in removing meteoric iron from Earth's mesosphere. The discovery could help researchers refine their models of atmospheric chemistry and global warming.

Published Date: April 15, 2004


Measurement technique can image how heat moves through material

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 5, 2004

Infrared cameras create images by detecting the heat given off by an object, including the body of a soldier hidden in the dark of night. Now, researchers have developed a technique for imaging how fast heat can move through an object.

Published Date: April 5, 2004


Electricity-transmission grid, power markets among conference topics

Author: Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:April 1, 2004

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will offer a course for industry specialists on electricity transmission and power markets June 14-17.

Published Date: April 1, 2004


New polyelectrolyte inks create fine-scale structures through direct writing

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 24, 2004

Like spiders spinning webs, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are creating complex, three-dimensional structures with micron-size features using a robotic deposition process called direct-write assembly.

Published Date: March 24, 2004


High-performance, single-crystal plastic transistors reveal hidden behavior

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 11, 2004

Printing circuits on sheets of plastic may offer a low-cost technique for manufacturing thin-film transistors for flexible displays, but maximizing the performance of such devices will require a detailed, fundamental understanding of how charge flows through organic semiconductors.

Published Date: March 11, 2004


Controlling material structure at nanoscale makes better thermal insulator

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 12, 2004

Heat may be essential for life, but in some cases - such as protecting the space shuttle or improving the efficiency of a jet engine - materials with low thermal conductivities are needed to prevent passage of too much heat. As reported in the Feb. 13 issue of the journal Science, researchers have created a better thermal insulator by controlling material structure at the nanoscale.

Published Date: February 12, 2004


Etching holes in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers creates better beam

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 10, 2004

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found a way to significantly improve the performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by drilling holes in their surfaces. Faster and cheaper long-haul optical communication systems, as well as photonic integrated circuits, could be the result.

Published Date: February 10, 2004


Puzzling height of polar clouds linked to solar radiation

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 26, 2004

Scientists have discovered why polar mesospheric clouds over the South Pole are nearly two miles higher than those over the North Pole. A variation in solar radiation - a result of Earth's elliptical orbit - is responsible, they say.

Published Date: January 26, 2004


New algorithm speeds simulations of complex fluids

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 23, 2004

Computer simulations play an essential role in the study of complex fluids - liquids that contain particles of different sizes. Such liquids have numerous applications, which depend on a fundamental understanding of their behavior. But the two main techniques for the atomistic simulation of liquids - the molecular dynamics technique and the Monte Carlo method - have limitations that greatly reduce their effectiveness.

Published Date: January 23, 2004


New light-emitting transistor could revolutionize electronics industry

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 5, 2004

Put the inventor of the light-emitting diode and the maker of the world's fastest transistor together in a research laboratory and what kinds of bright ideas might surface? One answer is a light-emitting transistor that could revolutionize the electronics industry.

Published Date: January 5, 2004


Illinois researchers create world's fastest transistor ... again

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 6, 2003

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have broken their own record for the world's fastest transistor.

Published Date: November 6, 2003


Legislative backing needed to enforce standards for power transmission

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:August 21, 2003

America's electricity grid is only as strong as its weakest links, and the huge blackout last Thursday exposed some key flaws that threaten the integrity of the system, a power expert at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.

Published Date: August 21, 2003


Smart bricks could monitor buildings, save lives

Author: Jim Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 12, 2003

A "smart brick" developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign could monitor a building's health and save lives.

Published Date: June 12, 2003


Electron nanodiffraction technique offers atomic resolution imaging

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 29, 2003

A new imaging technique that uses electron diffraction waves to improve both image resolution and sensitivity to small structures has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The technique works on the same principle as X-ray diffraction, but can record structure from a single nanostructure or macromolecule.

Published Date: May 29, 2003


Fabricated microvascular networks could create compact fluidic factories

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 24, 2003

Using direct-write assembly of organic ink, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a technique for fabricating three-dimensional microvascular networks. These tiny networks could function as compact fluidic factories in miniature sensors, chemical reactors, or computers used in applications from biomedicine to information technology.

Published Date: March 24, 2003


Synergistic supergrid could meet nation's energy needs in 21st century

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 19, 2003

A high-capacity superconducting energy pipeline, or SuperGrid, could deliver electricity and hydrogen fuel across the nation and help meet future energy needs while reducing the consumption of fossil fuels, say experts who recently assessed the scientific feasibility of the idea.

Published Date: March 19, 2003


Fast algorithm could aid luggage inspection and medical imaging

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 12, 2003

Beleaguered luggage scanners at the nation's airports may soon find help in a fast algorithm developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The algorithm also promises to speed delivery of images generated by computerized tomography in hospitals and industry.

Published Date: February 12, 2003


Exploration of robots with emotions part of interdisciplinary series

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2002

What if the next Robbie the Robot is wired with human feelings? What if an advanced cousin of R2D2 finds himself falling in love? How would kinder-gentler cyborgs express their emotions and affections? How would that situation, in turn, affect human relationships?

Published Date: November 1, 2002


Low-voltage MEMS switch developed for high-speed electronics

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 3, 2002

Microelectronics researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a low-loss, wide-bandwidth microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switch that can be integrated with existing technologies for high-speed electronics.

Published Date: April 3, 2002


Initiative seeks more accessible Web tools, software for disabled

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2001

Companies that develop and distribute browsers, multimedia players and other Web-based software have become more savvy in recent years when it comes to understanding the needs of people with disabilities.

Published Date: December 1, 2001


New crash analysis system helps investigators target main cause of airplane accidents

Author: Sharita Forrest , News Editor

Published Date:November 29, 2001

A new crash analysis system is helping accident investigators shed more light on the main causal factor of aviation accidents: human error.

Published Date: November 29, 2001


Grateful alumnus behind gift to unique cross-disciplinary program

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2001

Alan M. Hallene learned the hard way how to combine business and engineering as he built the Montgomery Elevator Co. into the largest escalator manufacturer in North America.

Published Date: November 1, 2001


Corn-based carbon adsorbent tested at Illinois power plant

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2001

A successful full-scale test of the carbon-injection process for removing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants took place July 30-Aug. 12 at the University of Illinois Abbott Power Plant. The technology demonstration tested a commercial activated carbon and a corn-derived activated carbon developed by researchers at the Illinois State Geological Survey and the UI.

Published Date: September 1, 2001


Risk of lung damage from ultrasound greater than once thought

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2001

Pumping more energy into a beam of diagnostic ultrasound could produce a better image - and therefore a better diagnosis - but studies at the University of Illinois suggest the risk of ultrasound-induced lung damage is greater than many scientists previously believed.

Published Date: September 1, 2001


Nanoparticles 'tailor' complex fluids for photonics, ceramics applications

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2001

Researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered a fundamentally new approach for tailoring the stability of colloidal suspensions.

Published Date: August 1, 2001


Microchannel technology bodes well for ammonia as refrigerant

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2001

Modern microchannel tube technology - widely used in the automotive industry for heat exchangers - offers an excellent opportunity to rethink the use of ammonia as a refrigerant, say scientists at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: August 1, 2001


System senses ice buildup on wings, alerts pilot, protects aircraft

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

A smart ice-management system being developed at the University of Illinois would sense the effect of accreted ice on the performance and handling qualities of an aircraft, then alert the pilot, restrict the aircraft from potentially dangerous maneuvers, and adapt the flight control system to maintain safe operation.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Lithographic technique creates neuronal networks in a dish

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

Using a lithographic technique called microstamping, a University of Illinois scientist has produced patterned surfaces on glass substrates that integrate biocompatible materials and live nerve cells.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


New transducers may simplify treatment of prostate cancer

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

Researchers at the University of Illinois are developing transducers to improve the performance of ultrasound surgical beams used to treat both prostate cancer - the second leading cause of cancer death in American men - and the often painful but benign enlargement of the prostate.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Newly available tool makes the Web search a graphic experience

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2001

The campus that produced Mosaic, the graphical browser that helped produce the explosive growth of the World Wide Web, now has a graphical solution for searching the Web's vast resources.

Published Date: June 1, 2001


Operation of self-aiming camera modeled on how part of brain works

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2001

By recognizing both visual and audio cues, a self-aiming camera being developed at the University of Illinois can tell the difference between an airplane and an albatross.

Published Date: May 1, 2001


Guidelines developed for hydraulic design of safer canoe chutes

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 1, 2001

With the advent of warmer weather, many outdoor enthusiasts are taking to the water in canoes and kayaks. Some boaters, blocked in their travels by one of the myriad dams that dot the nation's waterways, may attempt to navigate the spillway - a dangerous practice that could result in death by drowning in the strong undertow that forms at the base of a dam. Scientists at the University of Illinois have a safer alternative: properly designed passageways called canoe chutes.

Published Date: April 1, 2001


Simple control strategy derived for solar-sail spacecraft

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 1, 2001

This year's anticipated launch of the Planetary Society's "Cosmos 1" spacecraft may usher in the long-awaited age of solar sailing. The performance of such spacecraft could be optimized with a simple control strategy developed by scientists at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: April 1, 2001


Mimicking biological systems, composite material heals itself

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 14, 2001

Inspired by biological systems in which damage triggers an autonomic healing response, researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a synthetic material that can heal itself when cracked or broken.

Published Date: February 14, 2001


Fiber-optic sensors detect damaged rails and faulty wheels

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2001

Broken rails or damaged wheels can cause train accidents with potential loss of life, injury or property damage. Researchers at the University of Illinois are fabricating fiber-optic sensors that can improve train safety by detecting flaws in rails and wheels.

Published Date: February 1, 2001


Sequential disinfection process provides safer drinking water

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2001

Fresh from the faucet, a killer may be lurking in your glass.

Published Date: February 1, 2001


Flawed legislation at heart of California's power problems, scholar says

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2001

It's a principle of physics as well as economics: If rapid pressure builds in a confined space and has nowhere to go, there's going to be an explosion.

Published Date: February 1, 2001


'Smart' flaps could improve efficiency of supersonic engines

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2000

Small flaps mounted in jet-engine inlet ducts may allow supersonic aircraft to fly faster and farther at less cost, say researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: December 1, 2000


Soft lithography used to fabricate transistors on curved substrates

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2000

Researchers at the University of Illinois have fabricated silicon thin-film transistors -- critical components of numerous sensor and display technologies -- using soft lithographic block-printing techniques and polymer inks in place of photolithography. "

Published Date: November 1, 2000


High-resolution acoustic system detects objects buried in soil

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

Archaeologists soon may be using sound waves to survey potential building sites for significant cultural artifacts, say researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Illinois should act now to increase production of electricity, expert says

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

Illinois needs to expand its production of electricity to avoid the kind of price shocks that tripled electric bills in parts of California this summer, a University of Illinois energy expert says.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Layered polymer films can be 'erased' by external stimuli

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

Scientists at the University of Illinois have fabricated ultrathin organic films that can be stacked together and "erased" by environmental stimuli. The erasable polymer multilayers could have applications in many diverse fields ranging from medicine to materials science.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Vapor-recovery system captures and recycles air pollutants

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

A device for capturing and recovering dilute volatile organic compounds and other hazardous air pollutants has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Film festival to explore people's fear of computers and other technology

Author: ndrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2000

The fictional birthplace of the world's first diabolical computer and the home of one of the world's top computer science programs is holding its first "Computer Fear Film Festival."

Published Date: September 1, 2000


Model reduces stress and warpage in polymer composite structures

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2000

Fiber-reinforced composites are strong and lightweight, but suffer from hidden stresses that can warp the final product or degrade its performance.

Published Date: September 1, 2000


Residual stress in piezoelectric ceramics can be reduced, put to work

Author: James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2000

By applying a mechanical bending stress to offset the effects of residual stress in a piezoelectric ceramic thin film, researchers at the University of Illinois have found a way to significantly enhance the film's performance.

Published Date: September 1, 2000


Meshless numerical methods simplify device design and analysis

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2000

University of Illinois engineers have designed numerical techniques that can help analyze MEMS devices and assist in the development of better computer simulation systems.

Published Date: August 1, 2000


Polymeric chains in 'Flatland' reveal surprises, researchers say

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2000

Contrary to what scientists have long thought, recent experiments at the University of Illinois have revealed that flexible polymers stuck to a solid surface crawl around in a very different way than they would in the bulk.

Published Date: August 1, 2000


Risk-management model evaluates groundwater-remediation designs

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2000

To better protect human health, the role of uncertainty must be considered in cleaning up contaminated groundwater sites, researchers at the University of Illinois say.

Published Date: August 1, 2000


Unlikely mix -- used tires, pistachio shells -- can clean up pollution

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2000

Researchers have come up with a way to use old tires and pistachio shells to remove mercury emissions from power plants.

Published Date: August 1, 2000


New visual inspection procedures are vital to bridge safety

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2000

Easy to design and inexpensive to build, pretensioned deck-beam bridges account for more than 7,200 bridges on Illinois highways and county roads. Two beams from such bridges have fallen apart, initiating a crash course in bridge inspection and repair.

Published Date: July 1, 2000


'Smart' material grows dumber with shrinking size, scientist says

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2000

As active materials become increasingly smaller for the next generation of smart materials systems, the need to understand and predict material response becomes critical. At the University of Illinois, an experimental investigation into how the properties and responses of smart materials -- such as piezoelectric ceramics -- change as a function of size has yielded a few surprises.

Published Date: June 1, 2000


Liquid film-thickness measurement technique is fast and inexpensive

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2000

Precise measurements of film thickness at liquid-vapor interfaces are important in commercial applications such as power plants, oil refineries and refrigeration systems, but are often expensive and difficult to make. Now researchers at the University of Illinois have developed an automated optical film-thickness measurement technique that is both inexpensive and nonintrusive.

Published Date: June 1, 2000


Scientists propose growing better semiconductor crystals in space

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2000

Crystals grown in space may be the next big step toward improved semiconductor materials for use in next-generation communication systems and advanced computers.

Published Date: June 1, 2000


Magnetic actuation folds micro-parts into 3-D structures

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2000

A novel fabrication technique developed at the University of Illinois could provide a reliable and robust method for assembling large arrays of three-dimensional microstructures.

Published Date: May 1, 2000


Mathematical model could remedy costly steel-making problem

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 1, 2000

In the modern making of steel, molten metal flows from a bathtub-shaped vessel -- called a tundish -- into a water-cooled, bottomless mold in a continuous casting operation. Clogging of the tundish nozzle can lead to hidden defects in the steel or costly halts in production. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a mathematical model that successfully predicts when clogs are about to occur, allowing time for remedial action.

Published Date: April 1, 2000


Technique tethers molecules to silicon with atomic precision

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 1, 2000

Researchers at the University of Illinois have successfully tethered individual organic molecules at specific locations on silicon surfaces. The precise manipulation of molecules on the atomic scale is an important step in the potential merger of molecular electronics and silicon-based technology.

Published Date: April 1, 2000


3-D helps officials better monitor power demand, manage markets

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2000

As the electric power industry becomes increasingly competitive, knowledge concerning the capacity and constraints of the electrical generation and distribution system will become a commodity of great value. Researchers at the University of Illinois are developing innovative methods for visualizing the wealth of data associated with the power system network, with an emphasis on the use of interactive animation techniques to aid decision makers.

Published Date: March 1, 2000


Fluorine enhances boron combustion in energetic propellants

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

Recent shock-tube experiments at the University of Illinois have shown that propellants containing fluorine can significantly enhance the combustion of energetic boron particles.

Published Date: February 1, 2000


Local and remote aerosol measurement techniques compared

Author: James Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

The environmental effects of man-made atmospheric particles, known as "aerosols," are of growing concern. Aerosols are now thought to significantly affect Earth's energy balance, throwing a wrinkle in climate-change forecasts. But accurate quantification of this effect will require combining remote techniques, such as satellite-based lidar, that can survey vast regions of the atmosphere, with local techniques that can provide detailed information on particle characteristics.

Published Date: February 1, 2000