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Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 9, 2014

When Illinois researchers set out to investigate a method to control how DNA moves through a tiny sequencing device, they did not know they were about to witness a display of molecular gymnastics.

Published Date: October 9, 2014


Civil and environmental engineering professor Praveen Kumar led research that determined bioenergy crops such as miscanthus can store more carbon in the soil than traditional corn or soybean crops.

Bioenergy crops could store more carbon in soil

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 2, 2014

In addition to providing renewable energy, grass crops like switchgrass and miscanthus could store some of the carbon they pull from the atmosphere in the soil, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: October 2, 2014


Tami Bond, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, has received a 2014 MacArthur fellowship, commonly called a 'genius grant.'

Illinois engineer wins MacArthur fellowship

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 17, 2014

Tami Bond, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship, commonly known as a “genius grant,” from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Published Date: September 17, 2014


Topography of a red blood cell as measured by the SLIM optical technique. Though the cell keeps its shape as it ages, the membrane becomes less flexible.

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 5, 2014

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers.

Published Date: September 5, 2014


Professor Sheldon H. Jacobson led a study that found that, though seatbelt use drops as obesity rises, states with primary seatbelt laws saw a drop nearly nine times less than states without such laws.

Seatbelt laws encourage obese drivers to buckle up

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 2, 2014

Obesity is associated with many health risks, including heart disease and diabetes, but University of Illinois researchers have found a possible way to mitigate one often-overlooked risk: not buckling up in the car.

Published Date: September 2, 2014