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An analysis of more than six decades of death rates from U.S. hurricanes by a team of University of Illinois researchers shows that severe hurricanes with a more feminine name result in a greater death toll. From left, Kiju Jung, a doctoral student in marketing in the U. of I.'s College of Business and the lead author on the study; Madhu Viswanathan, a professor of marketing; and Sharon Shavitt, a professor of marketing at Illinois.

Study: Hurricanes with female names more deadly than male-named storms

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:June 2, 2014

An analysis of more than six decades of death rates from U.S. hurricanes by a team of University of Illinois researchers shows that severe hurricanes with a more feminine name result in a greater death toll.

Published Date: June 2, 2014


Time is running out to avert severe global damage from climate change, says Don Fullerton, a finance professor and co-author of a chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's fifth assessment report.

Expert: Next 15 years is 'crunch time' for climate change

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:April 22, 2014

Time is running out to avert severe global damage from climate change, says Don Fullerton, a finance professor and co-author of a chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's fifth assessment report.

Published Date: April 22, 2014


Mutual funds are more likely to oppose a firms management when they are 'locked-in' to a position that would otherwise trigger a capital gains tax for their investors, says research co-written by Scott Weisbenner, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at the College of Business.

Capital gains tax 'locks in' investors, increases likelihood of opposition to fund management

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:April 21, 2014

Mutual funds are more likely to oppose a firm’s management when they are "locked-in" to a position that would otherwise trigger a capital gains tax for their investors, says research co-written by Scott Weisbenner, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at the College of Business.

Published Date: April 21, 2014


A labor dispute serves the NCAAs interests better than an antitrust lawsuit, which could potentially cost the NCAA millions of dollars in monetary damages, says Michael LeRoy, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

Labor relations expert: NCAA prefers labor strife to an antitrust lawsuit

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:April 7, 2014

A labor dispute serves the NCAA’s interests better than an antitrust lawsuit, which could potentially cost the NCAA millions of dollars in monetary damages, says Michael LeRoy, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

Published Date: April 7, 2014


Raising the minimum wage in Illinois to $10 per hour would stimulate the state economy but not have much of an effect on employment, according to a new study co-written by Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations on the Urbana campus.

Paper: Raise state minimum wage to stimulate Illinois economy

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:March 19, 2014

Raising the minimum wage in Illinois to $10 per hour would stimulate the state economy but not have much of an effect on employment, according to a new study co-written by Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations on the Urbana campus.

Published Date: March 19, 2014