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University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An used U.S. national data to determine the nutritional effects of eating meals outside the home.

Study: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food is

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2015

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home.

Published Date: July 1, 2015


Researchers, from left, Ephantus Muturi, Allison Gardner and Brian Allan found that different types of leaf litter in water had different effects on the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can carry West Nile virus.

What's in your landscape? Plants can alter West Nile virus risk

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2015

A new study looks at how leaf litter in water influences the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can transmit West Nile virus to humans, domestic animals, birds and other wildlife.

Published Date: July 1, 2015


University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Prabuddha Mukherjee, left, bioengineering professors Rohit Bhargava and Dipanjan Pan, and postdoctoral researcher Santosh Misra report the development of a new class of carbon nanoparticles for biomedical use.

Biomedical breakthrough: Carbon nanoparticles you can make at home

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 18, 2015

Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body’s immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues.

Published Date: June 18, 2015


The fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola can infect, and kill, multiple species of snakes.

Snake fungal disease parallels white-nose syndrome in bats

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 18, 2015

A deadly fungal infection afflicting snakes is eerily similar to the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report.

Published Date: June 18, 2015


University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan, pictured here with his dog, Ember, describes the advantages of testing potential cancer therapies on pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers.

Drug trials in pet dogs with cancer may speed advances in human oncology

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 16, 2015

Pet dogs may be humans’ best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, said University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs, he said.

Published Date: June 16, 2015


Scientists discovered that gut microbes, gene expression and enzyme activity all differ between rotation-resistant rootworms and their rotation-susceptible counterparts.

Study: Crop-rotation resistant rootworms have a lot going on in their guts

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 9, 2015

After decades of effort, scientists are finally figuring out how insects develop resistance to environmentally friendly farming practices – such as crop rotation – that are designed to kill them. The researchers say their insights will help develop more sustainable agricultural practices.

Published Date: June 9, 2015