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Tiny walking bio-bots are powered by muscle cells and controlled by an electric field.

Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on command

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 30, 2014

A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.

Published Date: June 30, 2014


University of Illinois speech and hearing science professor Fatima Husain and her colleagues found that tinnitus, a condition in which a person hears a ringing sound despite the lack of an actual sound, is associated with emotional processing in a different part of the brain than in those without the condition.

People with tinnitus process emotions differently from their peers, researchers report

Author: Chelsey B. Coombs, News Bureau Intern

Published Date:June 25, 2014

Patients with persistent ringing in the ears – a condition known as tinnitus – process emotions differently in the brain from those with normal hearing, researchers report in the journal Brain Research.

Published Date: June 25, 2014


Palmer amaranth grows very fast, germinates throughout the season, produces lots of seeds, can tolerate heat extremes and is very adaptable, researchers report.

Palmer amaranth threatens Midwest farm economy, researchers report

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 3, 2014

An invasive weed that has put some southern cotton farmers out of business is now finding its way across the Midwest – and many corn and soybean growers don’t yet appreciate the threat, University of Illinois researchers report.

Published Date: June 3, 2014


University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Charles Hillman, right, and graduate student Mark Scudder looked at electrical activity in the brain to help explain why fitness is associated with better language skills in children.

Brain signals link physical fitness to better language skills in children

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 3, 2014

University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Charles Hillman, right, and graduate student Mark Scudder looked at electrical activity in the brain to help explain why fitness is associated with better language skills in children.

Published Date: June 3, 2014


Professor Ning Wang led a team that found the precise combination of mechanical forces, chemistry and timing to help stem cells differentiate into three germ layers, the first step toward developing specialized tissues and organs.

Stem cells take initial step toward development in the lab

Author: Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 30, 2014

The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory.

Published Date: May 30, 2014


While disparities between groups are troubling, obesity is going up at a similar rate in all groups, researchers report.

Intuitions about the causes of rising obesity are often wrong, researchers report

Author: Chelsey B. Coombs, Life Sciences Intern

Published Date:May 22, 2014

While disparities between groups are troubling, obesity is going up at a similar rate in all groups, researchers report.

Published Date: May 22, 2014