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The fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola can infect, and kill, multiple species of snakes.

Snake fungal disease parallels white-nose syndrome in bats

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 18, 2015

A deadly fungal infection afflicting snakes is eerily similar to the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report.

Published Date: June 18, 2015


University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan, pictured here with his dog, Ember, describes the advantages of testing potential cancer therapies on pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers.

Drug trials in pet dogs with cancer may speed advances in human oncology

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 16, 2015

Pet dogs may be humans’ best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, said University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs, he said.

Published Date: June 16, 2015


Bottlenose dolphins found on Gulf of Mexico beaches after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill had severe lung and adrenal gland abnormalities consistent with petroleum product exposure, researchers report.

Researchers link dolphin deaths to Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 20, 2015

Dolphins found stranded on Gulf of Mexico beaches following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill were much more likely to have severe lung and adrenal gland damage “consistent with petroleum product exposure” than dolphins stranded elsewhere and prior to the spill, researchers report. One in five dolphins from the spill zone also had primary bacterial pneumonia.

Published Date: May 20, 2015


Jodi Flaws Photo by L. Brian Stauffer  In studies of mice, comparative biosciences professor Jodi Flaws and her colleagues linked phthalate exposure during pregnancy to reproductive problems in parent and offspring, and to degradation of the function and structure of the ovaries.

The phthalate DEHP undermines female fertility in mice

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 16, 2015

Two studies in mice add to the evidence that the phthalate DEHP, a plasticizing agent used in auto upholstery, baby toys, building materials and many other consumer products, can undermine female reproductive health, in part by disrupting the growth and function of the ovaries.

Published Date: April 16, 2015


In a study of mice, comparative biosciences professor Jodi Flaws and her colleagues linked BPA exposure during pregnancy to reproductive problems in the next three generations.

BPA exposure in pregnant mice affects fertility in three generations

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 15, 2015

When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.

Published Date: April 15, 2015