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Carol Symes, a professor of history and medieval studies, is the executive editor of the new journal, The Medieval Globe, sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.

New journal looks at significance of research on the Black Death

Author: Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor

Published Date:December 8, 2014

A new publication, “Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death,” looks at new research into the plague and its historical significance. The publication is the inaugural issue of a new journal, “The Medieval Globe,” sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.

Published Date: December 8, 2014


U.S. House leaders will be thinking about the game being played with the Senate, president and party factions when they adopt their rules of procedure in January, says political scientist Gisela Sin, who analyzed 134 years of House rule changes for a new book.

U.S. House rules about much more than housekeeping

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 8, 2014

When the U.S. House of Representatives convenes in January, adopting rules of procedure will be among the first orders of business. Pretty mundane stuff, it would seem. Pay attention, though, says Gisela Sin, the author of a new book that analyzes over a century of House procedural rule-making, up through 2013. Those rules, written by the majority party, will have a huge impact on what follows in Washington over the next two years.

Published Date: December 8, 2014


Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive routine cancer screenings, according to new research by Xiaoling Xiang, a doctoral candidate in social work.

Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 21, 2014

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates.

Published Date: November 21, 2014


Three stars from baseballs steroid era, all with Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, got very different treatment over 12 years of national TV news coverage, according to a study by Brian Quick, a professor of communication and in the College of Medicine.

Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 20, 2014

Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro -- careers tarred by allegations of steroid use -- received very different treatment over 12 years of national television news coverage, says University of Illinois professor Brian Quick, lead author on a paper about that coverage and its effects, published online Nov. 20 by the journal Communication Research.

Published Date: November 20, 2014


Preschoolers of working moms get less sleep, which may explain why these children are at greater risk of becoming overweight, according to a new study by (from left) Janet Liechty, professor of medicine and social work; Katherine Speirs, postdoctoral research associate in human and community development; and Chi-Fang Wu, professor of social work.

Long work hours for moms mean less sleep, higher BMI's for preschoolers

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 20, 2014

The majority of preschoolers may not be getting the amount of sleep they need each night, placing them at higher risk of being overweight or obese within a year, according to a new study.

Published Date: November 20, 2014