Social Science News

Regional planning for residential development is successful only to the extent it aligns with local development priorities, say Arnab Chakraborty and Dustin Allred, University of Illinois researchers in urban and regional planning.

Local development often at odds with regional land use plans, experts say

Author: Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor

Published Date:August 21, 2015

A land use plan adopted for the Sacramento, California, region aimed to get local governments to plan together for development in a way that discouraged sprawl.

Published Date: August 21, 2015


Master Naturalists, from left, John Marlin, Thom Uebele and Jana Uebele stand in the Florida Orchard Prairie, one of the demonstration gardens on campus that Marlin coordinates and maintains. An entomologist, Marlin is a research affiliate with the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center. Thom Uebele is a research programmer with the School of Life Sciences, and his wife, Jana, is an artist.

Master Naturalists needed to preserve Illinois' environment

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:August 11, 2015

Adults who have a passion for the outdoors – and are interested in sharing that with others – are needed statewide as volunteers in the University of Illinois Extension Master Naturalist program.

Published Date: August 11, 2015


A new study says the sequential election format of the U.S. presidential primary is the best mechanism to select a candidate who would prevail in a head-to-head election against any one of the other candidates, says co-author and University of Illinois economist Mattias Polborn.

Study: Sequential voting in presidential primaries best system to winnow candidates

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:August 4, 2015

As the race for the 2016 Democratic and Republican presidential nominations enters the early stages, voters have a large pool of candidates to consider, including 17 declared candidates on the Republican side alone.

Published Date: August 4, 2015


Parents level of health literacy determines the weight-control strategies they would choose for their children, according to a new study led by Janet Liechty, a professor of social work and of medicine. Dr. Salma M. A. Musaad, a visiting research biostatistician in human and community development, and social work doctoral student Jaclyn A. Saltzman were co-authors.

Parents' health literacy affects child weight-loss tactics, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:July 28, 2015

Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests.

Published Date: July 28, 2015


Pleasure travel: Womens motives for taking sexual risks during leisure travel and the characteristics of tourist environments that promote sexual experimentation are explored in a new study co-authored by Liza Berdychevsky, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism.

Women's sexual risk-taking in tourism focus of new study

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:July 22, 2015

Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey.

Published Date: July 22, 2015


Modernizing Marriage was published in March by Syracuse University Press.

Egypt historical study shows 'traditional' marriage more modern than we think

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 15, 2015

Mention traditional marriage and family and it’s easy to think you’re talking about age-old customs. Those “traditional” ideals and practices, however, are more likely a product of the last two centuries, says a University of Illinois history professor.

Published Date: June 15, 2015


Websites geared toward older adults are providing this population with new opportunities to discuss and explore their sexuality, according to a netnography co-written by Liza Berdychevsky, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism.

Many older adults going online to discuss, learn about sex

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:June 10, 2015

Forget those ageist stereotypes that senior citizens have little interest in sex and are befuddled by technology. Many older adults are going online to dish about the joys of sex and swap advice about keeping their mojos working well into their twilight years, a new study found.

Published Date: June 10, 2015


A 1922 clash between Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson, both celebrated thinkers of the early 20th century, caused a split between science and the humanities that has never healed, says science historian Jimena Canales, in a new book.

Science historian writes about Einstein and his most dangerous critic

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 26, 2015

Two of the 20th century’s greatest minds, one of them physicist Albert Einstein, came to intellectual blows one day in Paris in 1922. Their dispute, before a learned audience, was about the nature of time – mostly in connection with Einstein’s most famous work, the theory of relativity, which marks its centennial this year.

Published Date: May 26, 2015


Our images of journalists, both good and bad, likely come from portrayals in popular culture as much as from what journalists actually do, says University of Illinois journalism professor Matthew Ehrlich, who co-wrote a book on the subject with USC journalism professor Joe Saltzman

Popular images of journalists have changed little over a century, says new book

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 23, 2015

If you think reporters are scoundrels, you might point to popular culture. If you think they’re heroes, you might do the same.

Published Date: April 23, 2015


Illinois colonial history is a distinctive one, says University of Illinois historian Robert Morrissey in a new book. The French who settled there found a mutual self-interest with the Illinois Indians, forming not only alliances but mixed-race communities. They often worked against the goals of the French empire.

Historian's tale of colonial Illinois about collaboration rather than conquest

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 23, 2015

Illinois has an early colonial history that’s easily forgotten, or boiled down to just the explorers Marquette and Jolliet and a few French fur traders.

Published Date: April 23, 2015


This photo of a 30-something Abraham Lincoln, the earliest portrait of the future president, brought a flood of letters to the magazine that first published it, three decades after Lincolns death. Communication professor Cara Finnegan explores their responses, and what they say about how we interpret photos, as part of a new book.

Expert: How we view Lincoln may say more about us than him

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 2, 2015

Americans see a lot of Abraham Lincoln – on our money, in advertising, in photos and films. It’s easy to think we know the guy. But what we see in Lincoln may say more about us and our times than about him, said University of Illinois communication professor Cara Finnegan.

Published Date: April 2, 2015


Perinatal depression screenings will be available electronically to Champaign-Urbana Public Health clients through a collaborative project led by social work professor Karen M. Tabb Dina, center. Shown with Tabb Dina are co-authors Brandon Meline, director of maternal and child health management at Public Health; and graduate student Maria Pineros-Leano.

Project to use tablets to screen women for perinatal depression

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:March 19, 2015

Perinatal depression screenings will be available electronically to Champaign-Urbana Public Health clients through a collaborative project led by social work professor Karen M. Tabb Dina, center. Shown with Tabb Dina are co-authors Brandon Meline, director of maternal and child health management at Public Health; and graduate student Maria Pineros-Leano.

Published Date: March 19, 2015


Increasing numbers of older Americans are traveling abroad to perform volunteer work  and host communities and organizations are clamoring to recruit them, according to studies by social work professor Benjamin Lough and doctoral student Xiaoling Xiang.

More older adults from U.S. volunteering in other countries

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 10, 2015

Nearly 290,000 older adults from the U.S. volunteered abroad during 2012 – an increase of more than 60 percent in less than a decade, a recent study found.

Published Date: March 10, 2015


Health care providers are less likely to counsel patients with mental illness about dietary intake or exercise, despite these patients greater utilization of medical services and increased risks of many diseases, according to new research by Xiaoling Xiang, a doctoral candidate in social work.

Patients with mental illness less likely to receive diet, exercise advice

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:February 24, 2015

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness – and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes – said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator.

Published Date: February 24, 2015


Former USA Today editor Ken Paulson narrates a performance of Freedom Sings, a musical tribute to free speech in America, told through rock, pop, hip-hop and country music. The show is coming to the Illinois campus as the first in a series on free speech in a digital age.

'Freedom Sings' event on March 3 to tell the story of free speech through song

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 16, 2015

A musical tribute to the First Amendment is coming to the University of Illinois campus March 3. The multimedia performance, titled “Freedom Sings: Speech, Civility and the University of Illinois,” will be at 8 p.m. in the Knight Auditorium at the Spurlock Museum, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana. The event is free and open to the public.

Published Date: February 16, 2015


Half as many girls in Illinois are preparing for careers in STEM, according to a study by, from left, curriculum specialist Joel Malin, doctoral student Asia Fuller Hamilton, and director Donald Hackmann of the Pathways Resource Center.

Illinois trailing other states in girls studying science, math

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education and Social Work Editor

Published Date:February 4, 2015

A new study found Illinois educators and lawmakers have homework to do to figure out why fewer girls at the state’s high schools study subjects associated with careers in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields than their peers in other states.

Published Date: February 4, 2015


Journalism professor Matthew Ehrlich found hundreds of cat tales, both fun and serious, over 140 years of New York Times history. In the process, he also found evidence of our evolving relationship with animals and reasons to take animal news seriously.

There have been a lot of cats in The New York Times, and not all just for fun

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 3, 2015

The cute cat video seems to be everywhere online, and it’s become a handy epithet for everything that journalism should not be. So what should we make of the fact that The New York Times, that paragon of journalism, has written a lot about cats over 140 years? That’s the question posed by University of Illinois journalism professor Matthew Ehrlich after compiling hundreds of cat-related tales from the Times’ digital archive.

Published Date: February 3, 2015


Brittany Duff and co-author Sela Sar found that video ads viewed while multitasking were just as effective as when viewed alone, at least for those who process content more holistically. They also found that multitasking probably works best when you're in a good mood.

Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 26, 2015

Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of your multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as the ads you’re really watching, such as those during the Super Bowl, says a University of Illinois researcher.

Published Date: January 26, 2015


Special education professor Meghan M. Burke examined parents' use of procedural safeguards in resolving disputes with schools about the education provided to their children with autism.

Family income, child behavior factors in legal disputes about kids with autism

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:January 12, 2015

Families whose children with autism spectrum disorders spend less than 20 percent of their time in mainstream classrooms are nearly twice as likely to resort to litigation, such as filing for due process hearings or mediation, when they disagree with school officials about their children’s education, according to a recent survey of parents.

Published Date: January 12, 2015


Optimists are twice as likely to be in ideal cardiovascular health, according to a new study led by Rosalba Hernandez, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois.

Optimistic people have healthier hearts, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:January 8, 2015

People who have upbeat outlooks on life have significantly better cardiovascular health, suggests a new study that examined associations between optimism and heart health in more than 5,100 adults.

Published Date: January 8, 2015


Travis Dixon found that Muslims and Latinos were significantly overrepresented, and African-Americans largely missing, in crime stories aired over five years on prominent network and cable breaking news programs.

Muslims and Latinos much more prominent in TV crime news than in real-life crime

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 7, 2015

If it seems as if most terrorists are Muslims and almost all immigrant lawbreakers are Latinos, it may be because you’re watching national TV news – not because those things are true. That’s one implication of a study of five years of network and cable crime news led by University of Illinois communication professor Travis Dixon.

Published Date: January 7, 2015


U. of I. has three of top 100 scholarly articles receiving the most attention online in 2014

Author: Jodi Heckel, Arts & Humanities Editor

Published Date:December 22, 2014

In a review of the scholarly research that captured the most public attention online this year, three of the top 100 articles had authors from the University of Illinois.

Published Date: December 22, 2014


Living in walkable, low-crime neighborhoods promotes mental health in elderly Latinos, according to a new study led by Rosalba Hernandez, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois.

Low-crime, walkable neighborhoods promote mental health in older Latinos

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:December 8, 2014

Older Latinos living in the U.S. who perceive their neighborhoods as safer and more walkable are less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms, and the effect may be long term, a new study suggests.

Published Date: December 8, 2014


Carol Symes, a professor of history and medieval studies, is the executive editor of the new journal, The Medieval Globe, sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.

New journal looks at significance of research on the Black Death

Author: Jodi Heckel, Arts and Humanities Editor

Published Date:December 8, 2014

A new publication, “Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death,” looks at new research into the plague and its historical significance. The publication is the inaugural issue of a new journal, “The Medieval Globe,” sponsored by the University of Illinois Program in Medieval Studies.

Published Date: December 8, 2014


U.S. House leaders will be thinking about the game being played with the Senate, president and party factions when they adopt their rules of procedure in January, says political scientist Gisela Sin, who analyzed 134 years of House rule changes for a new book.

U.S. House rules about much more than housekeeping

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 8, 2014

When the U.S. House of Representatives convenes in January, adopting rules of procedure will be among the first orders of business. Pretty mundane stuff, it would seem. Pay attention, though, says Gisela Sin, the author of a new book that analyzes over a century of House procedural rule-making, up through 2013. Those rules, written by the majority party, will have a huge impact on what follows in Washington over the next two years.

Published Date: December 8, 2014


Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive routine cancer screenings, according to new research by Xiaoling Xiang, a doctoral candidate in social work.

Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 21, 2014

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates.

Published Date: November 21, 2014


Three stars from baseballs steroid era, all with Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, got very different treatment over 12 years of national TV news coverage, according to a study by Brian Quick, a professor of communication and in the College of Medicine.

Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 20, 2014

Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro -- careers tarred by allegations of steroid use -- received very different treatment over 12 years of national television news coverage, says University of Illinois professor Brian Quick, lead author on a paper about that coverage and its effects, published online Nov. 20 by the journal Communication Research.

Published Date: November 20, 2014


Preschoolers of working moms get less sleep, which may explain why these children are at greater risk of becoming overweight, according to a new study by (from left) Janet Liechty, professor of medicine and social work; Katherine Speirs, postdoctoral research associate in human and community development; and Chi-Fang Wu, professor of social work.

Long work hours for moms mean less sleep, higher BMI's for preschoolers

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 20, 2014

The majority of preschoolers may not be getting the amount of sleep they need each night, placing them at higher risk of being overweight or obese within a year, according to a new study.

Published Date: November 20, 2014


A new study by Karen Rudolph indicates that boys and girls who mature early are at higher risk of several adverse outcomes, including depression. Rudolph is a professor of psychology at Illinois.

Teens who mature early at greater risk of depression, study says

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:November 19, 2014

Youth who enter puberty ahead of their peers are at heightened risk of depression, although the disease develops differently in girls than in boys, a new study suggests.

Published Date: November 19, 2014


New studies by social work professor Venera Bekteshi explore the contextual factors that contribute to acculturative stress and emotional distress among immigrant Latinas in the U.S.

Discrimination, family conflict key sources of stress for Latina immigrants

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:November 19, 2014

Racial discrimination and family issues are key contributors to the acculturative stress experienced by Latina immigrant women in the U.S., new research suggests.

Published Date: November 19, 2014


Teaching and research are strongly linked as part of the student learning experience in An Illinois Sampler: Teaching and Research on the Prairie, with essays by Illinois faculty from a wide range of disciplines. The book was recently published by the University of Illinois Press.

Teaching and Research are a Potent Educational Mix, Say U. of I. Faculty in a New Book

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 3, 2014

A common perception, especially outside the university classroom, is that teaching and research are two separate domains, with little overlap. That’s not the reality, however, for many University of Illinois faculty – including those whose 18 essays appear in “An Illinois Sampler: Teaching and Research on the Prairie,” recently published by the University of Illinois Press.

Published Date: November 3, 2014


A study by School of Social Work alumna Chennan Liu suggests that extreme gaming may have positive as well as negative effects on teens.

Teen gaming addicts may wind up physically healthier as young adults, study says

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:October 7, 2014

Teens who play video/computer games 21 hours a week or more may be physically healthier and less prone to obesity as young adults than peers who spend their time on other pursuits. But gamers who log the most screen time also may be more prone to depression in young adulthood, a new study says.

Published Date: October 7, 2014


STUDYING LEISURE: The Office of Recreation and Park Resources conducts a biennial survey of public recreation operators in Illinois. Co-authors are: graduate student Megan Owens, community services and education coordinator Jarrod Scheunemann and Robin Hall (not pictured), ORPRs director.

Trails, pickleball popular with Illinois fitness enthusiasts, survey says

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 7, 2014

Illinoisans want more trails, interest in pickleball is on the upswing, and some communities are pulling the plugs on their aging swimming pools, according to a recent survey of the organizations and municipalities that operate public recreation facilities in Illinois.

Published Date: October 7, 2014


Julie A. Dowling, a professor of Latina and Latino studies, has been named to a national committee advising the U.S. Census Bureau.

U. of I. professor named to U.S. Census Bureau advisory committee

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 6, 2014

The U.S. Census Bureau has named Julie A. Dowling, a University of Illinois professor of Latina and Latino studies, to its National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic and Other Populations.

Published Date: October 6, 2014


view image RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY: New research by doctoral student Tamilia D. Reed and educational psychology professor Helen A. Neville indicates that spirituality, rather than religiosity, may be the element that is critical to black American women's life satisfaction and mental health.

Study: Spirituality, not religion, is critical to black women's well-being

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 24, 2014

A number of studies have suggested that religion plays a critical role in black Americans’ mental health and life satisfaction, aiding their ability to cope with personal and societal stressors. However, a new study indicates that spirituality, rather than religiosity, may be the element that is essential to black women’s psychological well-being.

Published Date: September 24, 2014


SOCIAL STUDIES: New research by Nicole Llewellyn and Karen Rudolph suggests that children's gender, social orientation and sensitivity to social rewards and punishments may determine their responses to peer victimization. Llewellyn is a doctoral candidate and Rudolph is a faculty member, both in the department of psychology.

Gender, social orientation affect children's reactions to bullying

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 24, 2014

A new study of nearly 600 third-graders may explain why some children who experience peer victimization develop problems with depression or aggression while other children who also get bullied have healthy emotional and social adjustment.

Published Date: September 24, 2014


Linda Herrera, a social anthropologist in the department of education policy, organization and leadership at Illinois, found there was much more going on behind the scenes and in online spaces than what initially appeared in Egypt's 'Facebook revolution' of 2011.

Intrigue, power struggles and genuine doubt all found in the Facebook of Egypt's revolution

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 17, 2014

Egypt’s 2011 revolution, described at the time as a “Facebook revolution,” made Linda Herrera a big believer in the power of social media. A past resident of Cairo who had studied the online culture of Egyptian youth and followed events through their Facebook pages, the University of Illinois education professor became, for a moment in time, a “complete cyber-optimist.”

Published Date: September 17, 2014


It's not concerns about the cost that keep many people from getting help with civil justice problems, says Rebecca Sandefur, a professor of sociology and of law at Illinois, in a new report.

Many solve civil justice problems on their own, rarely involving attorneys, says study

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 19, 2014

Many of life’s problems are also civil legal problems, but people don’t see them that way. As a result, they often deal with them on their own, and rarely involve lawyers or courts, or even other third parties, according to a recent study.

Published Date: August 19, 2014


New research by Liza Berdychevsky and colleagues explores the motivations and consequences - both beneficial and detrimental - of women's sexual risk-taking during tourist travel. Berdychevsky is a professor in the department of recreation, sport and tourism in the College of Applied Health Sciences at the University of Illinois.

Studies explore sexual risk-taking among women travelers

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 18, 2014

For some women, sexual adventures during tourist travel can be life-changing – sparking sexual fulfillment and personal growth, or potentially causing devastating health or social problems, two new studies suggest.

Published Date: August 18, 2014


Communication professor Leanne Knobloch has spent the past five years studying how military families adjust after a service members return from deployment.

Returning troops and their families have work to do after the reunion

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 30, 2014

Many service members will arrive in the U.S. to happy reunions. But reunited couples and families will have work to do in the months that follow, says Leanne Knobloch, a University of Illinois communication professor who has studied the relationships of military families post-deployment for about five years – and is starting new research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense.

Published Date: July 30, 2014


University of Illinois anthropology professor Kathryn Clancy led a new study of sexual harassment and assault of men and women working on scientific field studies.

Sexual harassment and assault are common on scientific field studies, survey indicates

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 16, 2014

A survey of 142 men and 516 women with experience in field studies in anthropology, archaeology, geology and other scientific disciplines reveals that many of them – particularly the younger ones – suffered or witnessed sexual harassment or sexual assault while at work in the field.

Published Date: July 16, 2014


A new study by social work professors Douglas C. Smith and Karen M. Tabb suggests that refusal skills training may not help minority adolescents with substance abuse problems avoid relapse.

Learning to 'just say no' is not a panacea for minorities with alcohol, drug problems

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Work Editor

Published Date:July 10, 2014

Teaching youth to “just say no” has long been viewed as the first line of defense in the war on drugs. And several studies have provided compelling evidence that refusal skills training, which teaches participants strategies for resisting social pressure, can be successful at preventing youth from trying drugs and alcohol.

Published Date: July 10, 2014


The dead and wounded get little mention in wartime news coverage, whether its World War I or Iraq, says Scott Althaus, a professor of political science and of communication, pictured in front of columns honoring World War I dead at Illinois Memorial Stadium. Althaus led a study analyzing nearly 2,000 war-related stories that appeared in the New York Times over five major conflicts.

Casualties get scant attention in wartime news, with little change since World War I

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2014

The human costs of America’s wars have received scant attention in daily war reporting – through five major conflicts going back a century – says an extensive and first-of-its-kind study of New York Times war coverage being published this month.

Published Date: May 1, 2014


The Cline Center for Democracy, led by Peter F. Nardulli, is focused on the causes of violent civil strife worldwide. Its latest effort is a newly public database that traces trends in the composition of ethnic and religious groups in 165 countries, going back seven decades.

New database designed to aid study of ethnic, religious strife worldwide

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 30, 2014

The power of ethnic hatred was on full display in the Rwandan genocide that began 20 years ago this month, but it’s only the most extreme example of ethnic and religious strife that continues around the world. Today’s examples can be found in Afghanistan, Egypt and Iraq, among many others. Those trying to understand these “sociocultural” animosities and conflicts – whether academics, journalists or nongovernmental organizations – now have a new tool at their disposal: a public database that pulls together multiple sources on trends in the composition of ethnic and religious groups in 165 countries, going back seven decades, to the end of World War II.

Published Date: April 30, 2014


A new course co-developed by plant science professor Katy Heath teaches graduate students skills such as communicating about their research with nonscientists and developing educational outreach programs. Part of the Amplify the Signal course: graduate students, from left, front row, Cassandra Wesseln, Jennifer Han and Miranda Haus; back row, Rhiannon Peery, Christina Silliman and Heath.

Aspiring scientists learning to translate their research into language public understands

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:April 3, 2014

Communicating the relevance of one’s scientific research to general audiences and developing educational outreach programs are critical to the career success of college professors and researchers, but graduate curricula often fail to help students cultivate these essential skills.

Published Date: April 3, 2014


Differences in the collective personalities of state populations are strongly linked with differences in those states politics and how theyre governed, according to a new study by Jeffery Mondak (pictured) and Damarys Canache, professors of political science.

Research shows link between states’ personalities and their politics

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 31, 2014

One state’s citizens are collectively more agreeable and another’s are more conscientious. Could that influence how each state is governed?

Published Date: March 31, 2014


Economics professors Stefan Krasa and Mattias Polborn have published a paper on a theory of candidate competition that accounts for the influence of both economic and cultural issues on individual voting behavior.

Swing voters hold more sway over candidates on economic issues

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:March 19, 2014

Economics professors Stefan Krasa and Mattias Polborn have published a paper on a theory of candidate competition that accounts for the influence of both economic and cultural issues on individual voting behavior.

Published Date: March 19, 2014


When Mexican Americans say they are white on the U.S. Census, its often not for the reasons many assume, says Julie A. Dowling, a professor of Latina and Latino studies and author of a new book.

Question of race not simple for Mexican Americans, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 5, 2014

About half of Latinos check “white” in response to the question about race on the U.S. Census. About half check “other race.” They identify they are Latino in response to a previous question just for that purpose. Their choice of “white” or “other race” may have little to do with their skin color, their use of English or Spanish, or their comfort within the larger culture, contrary to common assumptions, says Julie A. Dowling, a University of Illinois professor of Latina and Latino studies.

Published Date: March 5, 2014


Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and author Hedrick Smith will participate in the Cline Symposiumon campus March 11.

Journalist Hedrick Smith to address the demise of the 'American Dream'

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 27, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and author Hedrick Smith will speak on “Who Stole the American Dream” in a talk at 7:30 p.m. March 11 on the third floor of Levis Center, 919 W. Illinois St., Urbana.

Published Date: February 27, 2014


Research on French female fashion merchants in the 1700s led history professor Clare Haru Crowston to new insights about the doomed queen Marie Antoinette and a pervasive system of influence and power that the French Revolution would seek to end  part of the story she tells in her new book Credit, Fashion, Sex: Economies of Regard in Old Regime France.

Fashion, sex, 'gray market of power' helped lead to French Revolution

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 22, 2013

Published Date: November 22, 2013


University of Illinois English professor Audrey Petty is the author of High-Rise Stories: Voices from Chicago Public Housing.

U. of I. English professor and team document life in Chicago's public housing

Author: Dusty Rhodes, Arts and Humanities Editor

Published Date:November 13, 2013

Growing up in Chicago’s Hyde Park-Kenwood neighborhood, Audrey Petty lived about two miles from the Chicago Housing Authority’s Robert Taylor Homes. Those 28 high-rises, arranged in horseshoe clusters along the Dan Ryan Expressway, contained more than 4,400 apartments, giving the complex the dubious title of largest public housing development in the nation. But though she could practically see the drab concrete towers from her doorstep, Petty regarded the Robert Taylor Homes as a foreign, mysterious and impenetrable enclave.

Published Date: November 13, 2013


Poor social and communication skills heighten risks of peer rejection and bullying involvement for students with disabilities, according to a new study by U. of I. alumnus Chad A. Rose; Dorothy Espelage, a faculty member in the College of Education; alumna Anjali Forber-Pratt, and Steven R. Aragon, of Texas State University-San Marcos.

Poor social, communication skills linked to peer rejection, bullying

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 30, 2013

Poor social and communication skills and psychosocial problems such as depression, low self-esteem and anger – all of which are often associated with disabilities – serve as risk factors for peer rejection and as predictors for bullying and victimization, according to a new study that was conducted at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: October 30, 2013


More than half of young women in high school or college have experienced at least one incident of sexual coercion, according to a new study by U. of I. alumnus Bryana H. French and Helen A. Neville, left, a professor of African American studies and of educational psychology.

More than half of students surveyed experienced sexual coercion

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 23, 2013

More than half (53 percent) of young women have experienced at least one incident of verbal, physical or substance-facilitated sexual coercion – and more than half of those incidents resulted in sexual intercourse, a recent study of high school and college students found.

Published Date: October 23, 2013


Single mothers who are underemployed are likely to go without health insurance longer than women who are unemployed, according to a new study by Chi-Fang Wu and Mary Keegan Eamon. Wu is a professor in the School of Social Work and Eamon is a professor emerita in the school.

Health insurance a dream for many single moms working part time

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 23, 2013

Single mothers in the U.S. went without health insurance coverage for an average of more than nine months during the country’s most recent economic recession, and mothers who were underemployed went without coverage longer than women who did not work, a new study by scholars at the University of Illinois indicates.

Published Date: October 23, 2013


The culture of Historic Route 66 and Midwesterners intrigue Australians, Europeans and other international tourists particularly, according to a new study of tourism along the 2,400-mile route that connects Chicago to Los Angeles.

Route 66, Midwest culture charm international tourists, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 21, 2013

Baby Boomers and nostalgia buffs from Australia, Germany and the United Kingdom are getting their kicks on Historic Route 66 in Illinois, a new study of tourism related to the road indicates.

Published Date: October 21, 2013


Soaring obesity rates among youth at risk of abuse/neglect point to a need for changes in child welfare policy, according to new research by Jesse Helton and Janet Liechty, faculty members in the School of Social Work.

Obesity found to be higher in preschoolers suspected of being maltreated

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 9, 2013

Obesity rates among preschoolers who have been investigated by child protective services for alleged maltreatment are nearly three times as high as children in the general population, a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois suggests.

Published Date: October 9, 2013


As part of ongoing research on organ donor registration in Illinois, professor Brian Quick, in the department of communication and the College of Medicine, led a study that found promotion of donor registration at DMVs brought an increase in donor sign-ups.

Organ donor promotion at DMV brings increase in registrations

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 9, 2013

More than 90 percent of the public supports organ donation, yet less than half the population registers as donors, surveys show. What if registration was better promoted to those who had previously turned it down? And at the place almost everyone makes that decision, the DMV? Research at 40 Department of Motor Vehicles facilities in Illinois shows such efforts can make a difference.

Published Date: October 9, 2013


Jay Rosenstein was one of six Urbana professors named University Scholars for their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

Urbana campus faculty members named University Scholars

Author: Jeff Unger

Published Date:September 10, 2013

Six Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars. The program recognizes excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The faculty members will be honored at a campus reception Tuesday (Sept. 10) from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois St., Urbana.

Published Date: September 10, 2013


Dieting at an early age and experiencing mild depressive symptoms increase boys and girls risks of developing eating disorders and engaging unsafe weight-loss behaviors as young adults, suggests a new study by Janet Liechty, a professor of social work and of medicine at Illinois.

Study examines factors leading to eating disorders in young adulthood

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:September 9, 2013

Youth who diet at early ages and report at least mild depression are at increased risk of developing eating disorders and engaging in unsafe weight-loss behaviors in young adulthood, new research by Janet Liechty and Meng-Jung Lee at the University of Illinois suggests.

Published Date: September 9, 2013


More than three-quarters of U.S. colleges and universities in a survey offer black studies in some form, says a new report from the African American studies department at the U. of I.

African American studies in the U.S. 'is alive and well,' new report says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 29, 2013

More than three-quarters of U.S. colleges and universities in a survey offer black studies in some form, says a new report from the African American studies department at the U. of I.

Published Date: August 29, 2013


A new study indicates that adolescent substance abuse has roots in bullying, fighting and familial violence, including conflict between siblings. Dorothy Espelage, a faculty member in the College of Education, led the research.

Study: Family violence can lead boys to aggression and to drug problems

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:July 15, 2013

Boys exposed to familial violence, including conflict between siblings, become increasingly aggressive toward their peers at school, and this aggression is associated with greater levels of alcohol and drug use over time, a new study by a University of Illinois researcher suggests.

Published Date: July 15, 2013


Social work professor Venera Bekteshi has found that a bout with cancer can be the catalyst for growth and healing in mother-daughter relationships.

Cancer and treatment side effect: Stronger mother-daughter ties

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 10, 2013

A bout with cancer can be the catalyst for growth and healing in mother-daughter relationships, suggests a new study by a University of Illinois social work professor.

Published Date: July 10, 2013


Photos of the carnage from Gettysburg and other Civil War battles shocked many who saw them, but also provided a way to manage grief and trauma, says communication professor Cara Finnegan. At left, dead Confederate soldiers in the 'slaughter pen' at the foot of Little Round Top at Gettysburg.

Civil War photos gave carnage a wide view, but also aided the grieving

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 19, 2013

Anyone with a passing interest in the Civil War has seen the photos of the battlefield dead. There are the rows and fields full of corpses from battles such as Antietam and Gettysburg (which will mark its sesquicentennial July 1-3). There are the faces and the expressions.

Published Date: June 19, 2013


U. of I. history professor and chair Diane Koenker, a specialist on the Soviet Union, tells the story of more than six decades of vacationing there in her new book Club Red.

Vacations part of Soviet Union's 'good life,' with Sochi the dream resort

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 3, 2013

The Soviet Union had its Gulag. It also had its seaside resorts. The same government that threw its citizens into labor camps also gave them vacations and places to spend them, some of them lavish, University of Illinois history professor and chair Diane Koenker says in a new book.

Published Date: June 3, 2013


Once public officials realized that they couldnt eradicate the sport of mixed martial arts, they decided to regulate events instead, often citing the events revenue potential as the reason for their reversal, suggests a recent study by Carla Santos and Scott Tainsky, professors of recreation, sport and tourism in the College of Applied Health Sciences.

Scholars document media's role in evolution of 'ultimate fighting'

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:May 6, 2013

Once derided as barbaric and tantamount to human cockfighting by many lawmakers, the mixed martial arts industry was on the fringe of the sports landscape during its early years in the U.S. and was banned in 36 states. Over the past decade, however, MMA and its foremost promotional vehicle, the Ultimate Fighting Championship, have made a dramatic turnaround, winning mainstream acceptance and legalization in all but two states Connecticut and New York.

Published Date: May 6, 2013


The shorter the intervals between previous reports of child abuse/neglect, the greater the likelihood that the children will experience another incident within five years, suggests a new study co-written by School of Social Work researchers, from left, Saijun Zhang, Tamara Fuller and Martin Nieto in the Children and Family Research Center.

Study examines risk factors in recurrent child abuse, neglect

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:May 6, 2013

The shorter the intervals between previous child maltreatment incidents, the greater the likelihood that the child will experience abuse or neglect in the future, suggests a new study by a social work professor at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: May 6, 2013


Jonathan Inda, a professor of Latina/Latino studies at Illinois, says the reform legislation being proposed in Congress offers little change from current policies heavy on enforcement  policies that can be traced to the last major immigration reform act in 1986.

1986 law helped lay foundation for 'governing immigration through crime'

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 22, 2013

Three key issues were at the center of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act: money for border enforcement, a pathway to citizenship and making it illegal to hire undocumented workers. But another provision of the IRCA, often overlooked, has had far-reaching consequences.

Published Date: April 22, 2013


Courtney Flint, a professor of natural resources and environmental sciences, contributed an essay in the new book co-edited by William Stewart, a professor of sport, recreation and tourism, that explores the emotional and spiritual attachments that exist between people and physical places, which are transforming conservation practices.

Peoples' relationships with places focus of new book

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:April 8, 2013

The strong emotional and spiritual attachments that exist between people and physical spaces are transforming conservation practices, a trend explored in a new book, Place-Based Conservation: Perspectives From the Social Sciences, published by Springer.

Published Date: April 8, 2013


Really existing capitalism is turning the Internet against democracy, says communication professor Robert McChesney, in his new book Digital Disconnect.

Capitalism and democracy not compatible on the Internet, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 14, 2013

Two decades into the digital age, the Internet is now enmeshed in the fabric of nearly every aspect of life, says University of Illinois communication professor Robert McChesney. In ongoing debates about its influence and future, there are, he says, celebrants and skeptics.

Published Date: March 14, 2013


Child welfare agencies struggling to increase parent engagement and counter negative stereotypes might consider enhancing social workers communication skills and creating public service announcements, suggests a new study by, from left, researcher Jill C. Schreiber, Tamara Fuller and Megan Paceley.

Negative public images hamper child welfare investigators

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 14, 2013

Even parents who have had no contact with child welfare agencies believe negative stereotypes about social workers and the likely outcomes of abuse or neglect investigations, misconceptions that complicate agencies efforts to engage parents in interventions.

Published Date: March 14, 2013


Film screening and panel to mark anniversary of church-state ruling

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 26, 2013

Recognizing the 65th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision McCollum v. Board of Education, the award-winning documentary The Lord is Not on Trial Here Today will be shown at 7 p.m. March 7 in the auditorium of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications Building, 1205 W. Clark St., Urbana.

Published Date: February 26, 2013


While bullying tends to peak at age 13-14 and decline sharply as youth progress through high school, boys who are gay/bisexual are bullied at significantly higher rates their heterosexual peers after leaving school, suggests a new study by Joseph P. Robinson, left, and Dorothy Espelage, both faculty members in the College of Education.

Bullying 'gets better' for most - but not all - teens, study says

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 4, 2013

Bullied teens often are assured that it gets better. And a new study suggests that bullying does, indeed, tend to decline as teens progress through high school and move toward adulthood.

Published Date: February 4, 2013


NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg, winner of the 2012 Illinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism, will give a public talk on Feb. 11 as part of a U. of I. campus visit.

NPR legal correspondent Nina Totenberg to speak Feb. 11 at the U. of I.

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 29, 2013

NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg, winner of the 2012 Illinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism, will give a public talk on Feb. 11 as part of a U. of I. campus visit.

Published Date: January 29, 2013


Marcella Raffaelli, a professor of human and community development at Illinois, is one of the co-authors on a study that found that families play a unique and powerful role in meeting the mental health needs of Mexican youth, especially during periods of stress.

Family thought to play part in reducing stress for young Mexicans, study shows

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 8, 2013

Family members may play a unique and influential role in buffering Mexican youth against the negative effects of stress as they transition into adulthood, suggests a new study by an interdisciplinary group of researchers at universities in Mexico and the U.S.

Published Date: January 8, 2013


An eight-year analysis of the National Football League wagering market conducted by researchers Scott Tainsky, left, and Yoon Tae Sung suggests that teams that are the away favorites may have unrecognized potential when theyre coming off their bye weeks. Tainsky is a professor of recreation, sport and tourism in the College of Applied Health Sciences, and Sung was a graduate student at the time of the study.

A better bet? Wagering on teams coming off a bye week

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 11, 2012

Think your simple wagering strategy for professional football such as always picking the home team or the underdog is going to pay off in the long run? Dont bet on it, say sports economists Scott Tainsky and Yoon Tae Sung.

Published Date: December 11, 2012


A volunteer (center) works with a married couple in Ishinomaki, a town in Miyagi prefecture, on reconstructing the garden outside their home after their residence and garden were damaged by the tsunami.

Leisure activities cultivate hope, resilience in disaster survivors

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 4, 2012

As survivors of Hurricane Sandy are learning, the emotional toll of natural disasters is as profound as their physical devastation. However, a new study of people who survived Japans deadly earthquake and tsunami in 2011 suggests that leisure activities can play critical roles in victims psychological recovery from natural disasters.

Published Date: December 4, 2012


Illinois history professor Craig Koslofsky

Magazine cites U. of I. historian's book as among best in 2012 list

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:December 3, 2012

Atlantic Magazine named Evenings Empire, by University of Illinois history professor Craig Koslofsky, as one of the 15 best books reviewed by the magazine or published in 2012.

Published Date: December 3, 2012


Advertising was an embattled and unpopular industry in the 1930s, but World War II gave it the opportunity to turn things around and cement its role in American society, says communication professor Inger Stole, in her new book Advertising at War.

The selling of wartime needs sold the U.S. on advertising, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 27, 2012

While it might be hard to imagine in the midst of the ad-soaked holiday season, there was a time in the 1930s when advertising faced fierce opposition from the public. Then came World War II, and everything changed, says Inger Stole.

Published Date: November 27, 2012


Environmental factors such as crime and poverty rates in the neighborhood where children live influence nonresident fathers engagement with their children, suggests a new study by Saijun Zhang, right, and Tamara Fuller, both faculty members in the School of Social Work.

Troubled neighborhoods deter some fathers from child involvement

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 25, 2012

Crime, gang activity and other problems of disordered neighborhoods decrease nonresident fathers involvement with their children, but it doesnt have the effect on fathers who live with their children in two-parent households, a recent study indicates.

Published Date: October 25, 2012


Most Americans wont know the names of the Native Americans in Frederick Hoxies new book, This Indian Country, but theyre the ones who persisted through years of history to make a place for Indians and give them their rights.

200 years of American Indian persistence turned U.S. into 'Indian Country'

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 22, 2012

Frederick Hoxie starts each of his courses asking students to list three American Indians, and their answers are almost always the same: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull and Geronimo.

Published Date: October 22, 2012


Numerous societal problems  including social customs that disadvantage women and soaring rates of poverty, domestic violence and governmental corruption  propagate sex trafficking in Albania, suggests a new study by Venera Bekteshi, a professor in the School of Social Work.

Albania must enact reforms to combat sex trafficking, study urges

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 15, 2012

Despite a number of measures undertaken by the government in Albania to curb sex trafficking, rigorous comprehensive legal and social reforms are needed to address the practices that perpetuate it, a new study led by a University of Illinois researcher indicates.

Published Date: October 15, 2012


New research by Angela Wiley, pictured, and Marcela Raffaelli, faculty members in the department of human and community development, indicates a need for broader level initiatives such as policy reforms that will improve the well being of Latino immigrant families and better integrate them into their communities.

Study examines well-being of Latino immigrant families in rural Illinois

Author: Sharita Forrest, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 3, 2012

The American dream is alive and well in Illinois rural communities among Latino immigrant families, who demonstrate considerable resilience in the face of multiple challenges, a new study indicates.

Published Date: October 3, 2012


Nina Totenberg, the longtime legal affairs correspondent for NPR, has been named to receive the 2012 Illinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism.

NPR reporter Nina Totenberg to receive U. of I. journalism award

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 2, 2012

NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, honored over decades for both her explanatory reporting and major stories on the U.S. Supreme Court and its nominees, will be the 2012 recipient of the Illinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism.

Published Date: October 2, 2012


The war and military necessity are what prompted Lincoln to issue his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, says historian Bruce Levine, but the war itself was by then already working to dismantle slavery and upend the southern society built around it.

Emancipation proclamation only one piece in ending slavery, historian says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 12, 2012

The war and military necessity are what prompted Lincoln to issue his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation 150 years ago, says historian Bruce Levine, but the Civil War itself was by then already working to dismantle slavery and upend the southern society built around it.

Published Date: September 12, 2012


A  new study by graduate researcher Jun Sung Hong (pictured) and faculty member Mary Keegan Eamon, both in the School of Social Work, found that whether adolescents feel vulnerable to violence at school depends on factors such as being able to make friends easily at school and regularly conversing with their parents about their concerns.

Factors that help students feel safer at school identified in study

Author: Sharita Forrest

Published Date:September 11, 2012

Incidents such as the one that took place at Normal Community High School on Friday (Sept. 7), during which a student armed with a gun briefly took classmates and a teacher hostage at the Illinois school before being subdued, provide sobering reminders that crisis plans are as imperative as lesson plans in U.S. schools today.

Published Date: September 11, 2012


The pre-Columbian settlement at Cahokia was the largest city in North America north of Mexico, with as many as 50,000 people living there at its peak.

Researchers find evidence of ritual use of 'black drink' at Cahokia

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 6, 2012

People living 700 to 900 years ago in Cahokia, a massive settlement near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, ritually used a caffeinated brew made from the leaves of a holly tree that grew hundreds of miles away, researchers report.

Published Date: August 6, 2012


A new study led by Patrick Hill, a postdoctoral research associate in psychology, suggests that feeling invulnerable to depression, low self esteem and other issues safeguards young peoples emotional health during the turbulent years of adolescence and perhaps into adulthood.

Young people's feeling of invulnerability has drawbacks - and benefits

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:August 6, 2012

A sense of invulnerability isnt a hallmark of youth as many adults may believe nor is it necessarily detrimental, a new study suggests. However, feeling immune to the problems and threats that affect others can be a blessing or a curse, depending on whether people believe theyre exempt from psychological risks or physical harm.

Published Date: August 6, 2012


Changes in values and norms  along with better pay and job opportunities for women  are  slowly increasing the number of stay-at-home fathers who leave the U.S. workforce to care for their children, according to two recent studies by Karen Kramer, a professor of human and community development.

Weak job market has more dads staying home - and they may stay there

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2012

Theres a quiet revolution going on in kitchens and carpools across the U.S. Increasing numbers of men are hanging up their power ties, waving goodbye to jobs with paychecks, and becoming full-time stay-at-home fathers who care for their children while their wives become the familys sole breadwinners.

Published Date: August 1, 2012


Is the competition between the athletes, or the scientists and engineers? We need to define what we want sport to be given that technologies are only going to come faster and more furiously in the future, says Rayvon Fouch, a historian of technology and former cyclist, working on a book about sport technology and the future of athletic competition.

Fair play in sport not easy to define in a high-tech age, expert says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 26, 2012

The technological edge can come in a swimmers revolutionary suit, in a cyclists specialized bike, in any athletes drug of choice whether legal, untraceable or not yet banned. Why are we quick to judge only some of this as cheating? And why are sport governing bodies so slow to address the inequalities, and then often after the fact?

Published Date: July 26, 2012


Jun Sung Hong, a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Work, collaborated with researchers at two universities in Seoul, South Korea, on studies that examined the origins of preschoolers aggressive behavior and tested an intervention program.

Parental conflict may manifest itself in preschooler behavior

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:June 28, 2012

Behavioral problems in preschoolers may mirror the intensity and frequency of their parents marital conflict and signal possible child maltreatment, suggests a new study co-written by Jun Sung Hong, a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois, and researchers at Ewha Womans University and Duksung Womens University, both in Seoul, South Korea.

Published Date: June 28, 2012


Better interagency collaboration is needed to help families when children are exposed to domestic violence, according to Ted Cross, a faculty member in social work and co-author of a study that examined legislative reporting duties in Australia, Canada and the U.S.

Better response plans needed for children exposed to domestic violence

Author: Sharita Forrest

Published Date:May 24, 2012

Each year, millions of children are exposed to domestic violence, a traumatic experience that has been associated with cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional problems in childhood as well as a higher incidence of depression and premature death in adulthood. Numerous studies over the past two decades also have indicated that exposure to domestic violence (EDV) places children at higher risk of abuse and neglect.

Published Date: May 24, 2012


Although often perceived as a burden to taxpayers, government spending on programs that serve the poor stimulates the economy, creates jobs and even enhances property values, according to a recent study led by Mary Keegan Eamon, a professor in the School of Social Work.

Social welfare cuts ultimately come with heavy price, researchers say

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:May 23, 2012

Although often perceived as a burden to taxpayers, government spending on programs that serve the poor stimulates the economy, creates jobs and even enhances property values, according to a recent study led by Mary Keegan Eamon, a professor in the School of Social Work.

Published Date: May 23, 2012


Many Internet news consumers are getting a broad cross-section of news, not just celebrity gossip and sports, says David Tewksbury, head of the department of communication and co-author of a new book that looks at current research on the subject.

Getting news from the Internet not as divisive as many assume

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 15, 2012

The Internet is changing the way people get their news, but theres little proof that it is fragmenting or polarizing the news audience the way many assume, says professor David Tewksbury, the head of the University of Illinois department of communication.

Published Date: May 15, 2012


Turkey was chosen as the destination because it is considered a safe place to travel, a focus of global attention, and a crossroads between the West and the Islamic world.

Dateline Turkey: Illinois students get a turn as foreign correspondents

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 2, 2012

Four classes, four continents. About every two years, a small class of University of Illinois journalism students under the supervision of professor Nancy Benson reports from a different part of the world, taking a two-week turn as foreign correspondents.

Published Date: May 2, 2012


David Strauser, a professor of kinesiology and community health, is the coauthor of a new study that examined links between personality traits and employment tenure among people with mild or moderate disabilities, an area that has been largely unexamined in prior disability and special education research.

Openness trait may help those with mild or moderate disabilities keep jobs

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:May 2, 2012

People with mild or moderate disabilities who are creative, intellectually curious and attentive to their feelings those who score higher on the personality trait openness may be significantly more likely to maintain employment, suggests a new study co-written by David Strauser, a professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: May 2, 2012


While many Chinese studies of Internet addiction treatments claim that the therapies are effective, an analysis by researchers in the School of Social Work found troubling inconsistencies. The researcher, from left, doctoral student Chennan Liu, professor Doug Smith and doctoral student Mini Liao.

Studies touting China's treatments for Internet overuse may lack validity

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:April 26, 2012

While many Chinese studies claim that the treatments for Internet overuse have high response rates, an analysis by researchers in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois found inconsistencies in reporting standards that raise troubling questions about the studies scientific rigor.

Published Date: April 26, 2012


Warring sides are less likely to negotiate when a peacekeeping force is sent into a conflict, making long-term peace less likely, says political scientist Paul Diehl, in an article co-written with J. Michael Greig, a professor of political science at the University of North Texas.

Peacekeeping forces often barrier to lasting peace, research shows

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 23, 2012

Could peacekeepers actually be a detriment to ending a war and finding long-term peace? An analysis of conflicts since World War II shows that thats the case more often than not, say two experts on the subject.

Published Date: April 23, 2012


Eighteen-year-olds asked to join the Illinois organ donor registry responded best to a simple letter and a mail-in form, rather than a colorful brochure and online registration, says professor of communication Brian Quick.

Organ donor campaign shows teenagers respond to simple over flashy

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 16, 2012

llinois in 2006 joined other states in creating a first-person, legally binding consent registry for organ donation. Now the task is persuading more people to sign up, including those newly eligible each year when they turn 18. But how do you reach these teenagers in a multimedia age?

Published Date: April 16, 2012


A new report by Jun Sung Hong, a graduate student in the School of Social Work, and Dorothy Espelage, a professor of educational psychology in the College of Education, indicates that anti-bullying programs developed outside the U.S. may have little to no efficacy with American schoolchildren.

Report examines bullying victims, perpetrators and countermeasures

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:April 16, 2012

A new report by researchers at the University of Illinois offers sobering information about bullying. Students who are the most vulnerable those with health problems or learning/developmental disabilities, who are poor or are racial/ethnic or sexual minorities are more likely to be victimized by their peers.

Published Date: April 16, 2012


The early-arriving Irish played a large part, for good and bad, in Americanizing the waves of immigrants who came after them, and in forming a multiethnic urban culture, says James Barrett, a social and labor historian at Illinois and author of The Irish Way: Becoming American in the Multiethnic City.

'The Irish Way' in shaping America's cities is subject of historian's new book

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 12, 2012

For many immigrants coming to the U.S. between 1890 and 1920, Irish meant American, according to historian James Barrett. The Irish were the Americans they interacted with, and whose strategies they often sought to emulate. As a result, the Irish would play a vital role, for good and bad, in Americanizing the newer arrivals and shaping the multiethnic city.

Published Date: March 12, 2012


Family debt hurts children's chances for success in college, study says

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:January 9, 2012

Families that have high amounts of unsecured debt, such as outstanding credit card balances and payday loans, diminish their childrens prospects of attending or graduating from college, according to a new study by social work professors Min Zhan at the University of Illinois and Michael Sherraden, the founder of the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis.

Published Date: January 9, 2012


Federal health care reform law holds hope for mental health services

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:December 15, 2011

Uninsured adults with serious mental illnesses may have a harder time finding care because state budgetary cutbacks are dramatically affecting services and staffing levels at community mental health agencies in Illinois and other states. But full implementation of the federal health care reform law could help alleviate that, according to scholars in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: December 15, 2011


Book addresses need for more infrastructure for Latino mental health

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:December 13, 2011

The unmet health care needs of Latinos in the U.S. and strategies for addressing the linguistic and other barriers that impede them are examined by a panel of experts in a new book, Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health, co-edited by Lydia Buki, left, a professor in the department of kinesiology and community health, and Lissette Piedra, a faculty member in the School of Social Work.

Published Date: December 13, 2011


Parental response to sexual abuse varies by age of victim, suspect

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:December 5, 2011

Parents are more likely to blame or doubt a child victim of sexual abuse when the suspected perpetrator is an adolescent rather than an adult, according to a new study that examined child molestation cases in four states. The findings also suggest that, regardless of the age of the perpetrator, parental blame/doubt toward the victim significantly increases if the victim is an adolescent.

Published Date: December 5, 2011


Study details homelessness, 'doubling up' among low-income children

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:November 17, 2011

About 10 percent of children in low-income families reported at least one homeless episode and an additional 24 percent had at least one episode where they lived doubled up with relatives, friends or other families before age 6, according to a new study led by Jung Min Park, a faculty member in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: November 17, 2011


Access to legal aid depends a lot on where you live, report says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 26, 2011

According to one estimate, half of Americans are confronting a civil legal problem at any one time. Without access to the right information or advice, or an advocate in civil court, they may lose a home, a job, maybe custody of a child, says Rebecca Sandefur. They may lose out in a divorce, or in a billing or insurance dispute.

Published Date: October 26, 2011


Educators to discuss how to better serve Latino pupils

Author: Dusty Rhodes, News Editor

Published Date:October 10, 2011

A panel of local educators who specialize in meeting the needs of immigrant children will discuss strategies for providing early childhood and elementary education to young Latinos at noon on Oct. 14 (Friday).

Published Date: October 10, 2011


Historian mixes policy and personal stories in history of U.S. immigration

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 28, 2011

Its not one border, one time, that makes an immigrant, says Dorothee Schneider. Its not a matter of crossing over and youre done. Despite what many politicians want us to believe, Schneider said, not everyone who has migrated to the U.S. has tried to stay permanently, successful immigration does not always mean Americanization, and successful immigrants dont all become U.S. citizens.

Published Date: September 28, 2011


Crisis nursery kids more likely to return to families from foster care

Author: Sharita Forrest

Published Date:September 19, 2011

Children who receive crisis nursery services prior to being placed in out-of-home care are twice as likely to be reunited with their biological families as other children in Illinois child welfare system, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: September 19, 2011


Study offers insight for returning troops and their relationships

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 31, 2011

Troops overseas often want nothing more than to get back home to loved ones but the reunion period often can be more emotionally taxing than the deployment. Returning service members are at a greater risk of both depressive symptoms and relationship distress, and research shows the two often go together, says University of Illinois researcher Leanne Knobloch.

Published Date: August 31, 2011


Historian charts a transformation of the night, from fear to embrace

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 18, 2011

Darkness truly ruled the night in the Europe of 1500. People feared almost everything about the hours after sunset, says University of Illinois historian Craig Koslofsky. Two centuries later well before the age of electricity the cities of northern Europe, at least, had embraced the night much as we do today, says Koslofsky, the author of Evenings Empire: A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe, recently published by Cambridge University Press.

Published Date: August 18, 2011


Narcissism may benefit the young, researchers report

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:August 10, 2011

We all know one, or think we do: the person whose self-regard seems out of proportion to his or her actual merits. Popular culture labels these folks narcissists, almost always a derogatory term. But a new study suggests that some forms of narcissism are at least in the short term beneficial, helping children navigate the difficult transition to adulthood.

Published Date: August 10, 2011


Gangs, violence rob inner-city kids of physical activity, study says

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:July 27, 2011

Many of the adults living in Chicagos South Lawndale neighborhood are first-generation immigrants, raised in Latin American communities where people feel close to nature, leave their doors wide open to their neighbors and the outdoors is an extended space for socializing with the community.

Published Date: July 27, 2011


Researchers say reality shows distort realities of addictions, treatment

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor

Published Date:June 28, 2011

Reality television series such as Intervention that claim to provide unflinching portraits of addiction and treatment dont accurately depict either one, and, at worst, the shows focus on the most extreme cases may deter some viewers from seeking help, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: June 28, 2011


NFL fans motivated by familiarity, uncertainty, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor

Published Date:June 8, 2011

With the bitter contract dispute between the National Football League Players Association and team owners apparently inching toward the goal line, armchair quarterbacks and television broadcast executives across the U.S. can breathe a collective sigh of relief that their favorite teams probably will kick off the 2011 season as expected and wont leave them with gaping holes in their schedules come fall.

Published Date: June 8, 2011


Not all citizens' votes created equal, study shows

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 25, 2011

Political science professor Tiberiu Dragu says some votes count for more than others in many democracies, and a multi-nation study he co-authored shows that some states benefit significantly in federal funding as a result.

Published Date: May 25, 2011


Radio documentaries came of age in postwar idealism and Cold War fear

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 19, 2011

Fred Friendly, president of CBS News, left, and journalist Edward R. Murrow share the cover of a new book by journalism professor Matthew Ehrlich, Radio Utopia: Postwar Audio Documentary in the Public Interest, published this month by the University of Illinois Press.

Published Date: May 19, 2011


Child abuse risk tied to type, degree of disability, study finds

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor

Published Date:April 25, 2011

Researchers have long known that children with disabilities are at increased risk of being abused by their caregivers. But a groundbreaking new study by Jesse Helton, a faculty member in the Children and Family Research Center in the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois, indicates that the risk and degree of physical abuse varies according to the childs type and level of disability and those at greatest risk of maltreatment may be those with average functioning or only mild impairments.

Published Date: April 25, 2011


Social work students affecting communities well before graduation

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor

Published Date:April 14, 2011

Before budding social workers grab their diplomas and embark on the next phase of their careers, many already have begun leaving indelible marks on the lives of people in their communities.

Published Date: April 14, 2011


Studies: Living wage, health insurance vital for low-income single mothers

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education/Social Work Editor

Published Date:March 30, 2011

While welfare-to-work programs mandate employment and push recipients into the labor market, many low-income single mothers have unstable and low-paying jobs that leave families vulnerable to hunger, inadequate housing, unmet health care needs and other hardships, according to recent studies by two researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: March 30, 2011


U.S. Civil War: Bringing down the 'House of Dixie' set off a revolution

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 21, 2011

The American Civil War not only was a series of monumental struggles on the battlefields, it also was a revolution behind the lines a profound upending of the social order that played out in the South through the four years of the war, says University of Illinois historian Bruce Levine.

Published Date: March 21, 2011


Combination of services helps mothers with chronic substance abuse issues

Author: Sharita Forrest, Education Editor

Published Date:February 16, 2011

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois indicates that mothers with chronic substance abuse problems are more likely to make progress in recovering from addiction and to reunite with their children in state custody if they receive residential treatment plus community-based transitional services.

Published Date: February 16, 2011


Anthropologist: 'Body Worlds' visitors confront bodies but not death

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 7, 2011

In two new works, anthropologist Jane Desmond tackles a perplexing question relating to the enormously successful Body Worlds exhibits: How does society tolerate and even celebrate the public display of human corpses?

Published Date: February 7, 2011


Organized labor an easy scapegoat for economic woes

Author: Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:January 27, 2011

Labor expert Robert Bruno says the Great Recession has become a convenient excuse for the vilification of unionized labor.

Published Date: January 27, 2011


In picturing their districts, legislators see some and not others

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 25, 2011

Hundreds of new and returning representatives arrived on Capitol Hill this month probably thinking they know their districts well. But the picture in their heads of the constituents they represent is in fact limited and flawed, thanks to unconscious mental shortcuts that determine who they see and dont see, says Kristina Miler (pronounced Miller), a University of Illinois political scientist.

Published Date: January 25, 2011


Study examines tie between aggression and caregiving environment

Author: Sharita Forrest

Published Date:November 23, 2010

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois indicates that children who spend in excess of 30 hours per week in non-relative care through the age of 4 1/2 may be exposed to a social environment that popularizes aggression, leading some children to become more physically aggressive than peers who spend less time in nonmaternal care.

Published Date: November 23, 2010


No one should take offense at professor's new book on insult

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 10, 2010

Tom Conley, a recently retired professor of communication at Illinois who has written a new book on the rhetoric of insults, says people take themselves too seriously.

Published Date: November 10, 2010


Gay Talese

Gay Talese to receive lifetime journalism achievement award

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2010

Gay Talese, the author of acclaimed books and articles on topics as varied as the Mafia, sports, immigration, the sexual revolution, The New York Times, and Frank Sinatra, will be this years recipient of the IIlinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism.

Published Date: November 1, 2010


At great expense, railroad bypassed first black-founded town in the U.S.

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2010

Ignoring topography, efficiency, expense and even their own surveyors recommendations, regional railroad officials in the mid-19th century diverted a new rail line around New Philadelphia, Ill., the first town in the United States planned, platted and legally registered by an African American, a University of Illinois researcher reports. The bypass pushed what would have been a fairly straight, even run of railroad tracks from Griggsville, Ill. to Hannibal, Mo., in a wide, hilly arc around New Philadelphia.

Published Date: November 1, 2010


Six international centers awarded four-year grants totaling $14.7 million

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 6, 2010

Six centers at the University of Illinois dealing with international areas and issues have received $14.7 million in federal grants to continue their programs through the current and next three academic years (2010-2014).

Published Date: October 6, 2010


Filmmaker's documentary tells story of groundbreaking church-state suit

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 29, 2010

The Lord Is Not on Trial Here Today, an hourlong documentary by U. of I. journalism professor Jay Rosenstein, tells the story of Vashti McCollum, a young Champaign, Ill., mother who filed a lawsuit against the Champaign board of education in 1945 that ultimately resulted in a U.S. Supreme Court decision three years later in her favor.

Published Date: September 29, 2010


Exercise to let students experience what it's like to live on low income

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:September 27, 2010

About 150 students who are taking an introductory course in social work at the University of Illinois this semester will experience the problems that low-income families in their communities struggle with every day when the students participate in a poverty simulation exercise on Tuesday (Sept. 28).

Published Date: September 27, 2010


New program to help people with alcohol issues continue treatment

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:September 21, 2010

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $712,000 grant to a University of Illinois researcher who is developing a program to help young adults with alcohol problems stay in treatment and recover with help from their friends.

Published Date: September 21, 2010


Researchers show transition to 'Soundbite University' in news coverage

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 8, 2010

Higher education has shifted from newsmaker to news commentator, at least in The New York Times, according to a University of Illinois study of the papers coverage over six decades.

Published Date: September 8, 2010


Research on team loyalty yields new insight into die-hard fandom

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:August 25, 2010

Theres a reason why some sports fans are referred to as die-hards even after they move away, their loyalty to their hometown team endures, according to research by Scott Tainsky and Monika Stodolska, professors of recreation, sport and tourism at Illinois.

Published Date: August 25, 2010


State cuts to mental health services continues disturbing trend

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:August 5, 2010

Proposed cuts to community mental health centers in Illinois continues a disturbing trend in the states lack of commitment to helping families and individuals experiencing a mental illness, says Christopher R. Larrison, a University of Illinois expert on community-based mental health services.

Published Date: August 5, 2010


Winning record, team longevity, prime-time games influence NFL TV ratings

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:August 4, 2010

Scott Tainsky, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism at the University of Illinois, says that many of the same factors that influence whether or not fans attend an NFL game in-person also influence a teams television ratings.

Published Date: August 4, 2010


Your personality plays a role in your political behavior, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 27, 2010

Our personalities play a role in every aspect of our lives, from friendships to hobbies, from whom we marry to what we do for a living. Its only natural, then, that personality should also play a role in our political beliefs and behavior, says Jeffery Mondak yet its long been ignored as a subject of study

Published Date: July 27, 2010


Epidemic played large role in shift of attitudes on abortion, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 23, 2010

Before Roe v. Wade, there was German measles. Ten years before the 1973 Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion which likely will be a focus of Senate confirmation questions for Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan next week German measles probably played the biggest part in starting to shift public attitudes about the criminal abortion laws, University of Illinois historian Leslie J. Reagan says in a new book.

Published Date: June 23, 2010


Study: Body-image distortion predicts onset of unsafe weight-loss behaviors

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:June 17, 2010

Janet M. Liechty, professor of social work and of medicine at Illinois, says that body image distortion, rather than the more commonly used measure of body dissatisfaction, may be a better screening tool to help identify non-overweight girls at risk for unsafe weight loss practices.

Published Date: June 17, 2010


How you picture your community could say a lot about your politics

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 17, 2010

Where is the line between us and them? Between our community and you people? In much of our political talk, the groupings often seem clear: red state, blue state; black or white, left or right. But in peoples minds its another matter, says Cara Wong, a political scientist at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: May 17, 2010


Politics often undermines best of environmental agreements

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:April 22, 2010

At the intersection of politics and nature, politics usually wins, even over the best intentions, says U. of I. political scientist Robert Pahre.

Published Date: April 22, 2010


Online interactions have positive effects for real-life communities

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:April 5, 2010

If you think Facebook, Twitter and other Web sites that foster online communication and interaction are merely vapid echo chambers of self-promotion, think again, say two University of Illinois professors who study computer-mediated communication and the Internet.

Published Date: April 5, 2010


Bilingual family liaisons increasingly important service

Published Date:March 24, 2010

Even during tough economic times, a school districts decision to cut support services aimed at helping Hispanic students and their families navigate through the public school system will prove to be a shortsighted one, especially given long-term demographic trends and the need for a highly educated workforce, says a University of Illinois expert in social services for vulnerable populations.

Published Date: March 24, 2010


Expert says state policies can have an impact on public health

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:March 12, 2010

In a new study, Tom ORourke, a professor emeritus of community health at the University of Illinois, examined 25 variables in four categories to see how state policies might affect residents health.

Published Date: March 12, 2010


Inside view of White House online is not what it seems

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 4, 2010

The Obama White Houses new-media photo archive is just the latest wrinkle in an old practice of image management and political communication, says Cara Finnegan, a communication professor who studies the political and persuasive uses of photography, and who has been studying the White House Flickr site..

Published Date: March 4, 2010


Genealogical tourism redefining leisure travel market, professor says

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:March 4, 2010

For the work-weary, the word vacation may conjure images of leisurely, carefree days at the beach sipping umbrella drinks. But according to published research by a University of Illinois expert in tourism and recreation, genealogical tourism is one of the fastest growing markets in vacation travel because it represents a conscious shift away from relaxation and into the realm of personal enrichment and fulfillment.

Published Date: March 4, 2010


Women, more than men, choose true crime over other violent nonfiction

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 15, 2010

When it comes to violent nonfiction, men are from Mars, the planet of war, but women are from Earth, the planet of serial killings and random murders.

Published Date: February 15, 2010


Fuller appointed director of Children and Family Research Center at Illinois

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:February 12, 2010

Tamara Fuller has been appointed director of the Children and Family Research Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: February 12, 2010


Cell-phone bans while driving have more impact in dense, urban areas

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:February 8, 2010

A new study analyzing the impact of hand-held cell phone legislation on driving safety concludes that usage-ban laws had more of an impact in densely populated urban areas with a higher number of licensed drivers than in rural areas where there are fewer licensed drivers, according to a University of Illinois researcher.

Published Date: February 8, 2010


Media scholar makes the case for subsidies to save journalism

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 4, 2010

Journalism in the U.S. needs government support, preferably tens of billions of dollars and soon, says Robert McChesney, a University of Illinois communication professor and co-author of a new book making the case.

Published Date: February 4, 2010


Video gamers: Size of brain structures predicts success

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 20, 2010

Researchers can predict your performance on a video game simply by measuring the volume of specific structures in your brain, a multi-institutional team reports this week.

Published Date: January 20, 2010


Those less motivated to achieve will excel on tasks seen as fun

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 19, 2010

Those who value excellence and hard work generally do better than others on specific tasks when they are reminded of those values. But when a task is presented as fun, researchers report, the same individuals often will do worse than those who say they are less motivated to achieve.

Published Date: January 19, 2010


Siblings play formative, influential role as 'agents of socialization'

Author: Phil Ciciora, Education Editor

Published Date:January 15, 2010

What we learn from our siblings when we grow up has for better or for worse a considerable influence on our social and emotional development as adults, according to an expert in sibling, parent-child and peer relationships at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: January 15, 2010


U.S., other free-trade leaders, now among most vulnerable to backlash

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 19, 2009

The United States has led the way for decades in promoting free trade and globalization, but contrary to common wisdom, its now among the most vulnerable to a growing backlash against it, says University of Illinois professor Jude Hays.

Published Date: November 19, 2009


Historian charts race, class dynamics of civil rights in St. Louis

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 15, 2009

The civil rights movement was never as unified as it often has been portrayed, says University of Illinois professor Clarence Lang.

Published Date: October 15, 2009


Historical and cultural geographer ponders Main Street hotels, the Midwest

Author: Melissa Mitchell

Published Date:September 14, 2009

In discussions of the recent economic downturn by politicians, journalists and their followers, its been next to impossible to dodge the phrase Wall Street versus Main Street. Clich though it may be by now, the phrase is effective in part because of the instant images both locales evoke. But when John Jakle, a professor emeritus of geography and of landscape architecture at the University of Illinois, references Main Street, its impossible for him to see past the one icon still standing in many a downtown across America: the landmark hotel.

Published Date: September 14, 2009


Speech expert says Obama needs a narrative, moral appeal and villains

Author: Craig Chamberlain

Published Date:September 4, 2009

Presidential rhetoric expert John Murphy says President Obama's healthcare message so far has been too fragmented. Murphy explains what the president needs to do to turn things around.

Published Date: September 4, 2009


Illinois failing to meet guidelines for child welfare, study indicates

Author: Sharita Forrest

Published Date:August 20, 2009

Although the recurrence of child abuse and neglect declined in Illinois during 2008, the state is failing to meet federal guidelines in these areas and could lose millions of dollars in federal funding as a result.

Published Date: August 20, 2009


Gang presence in urban parks complicates lives of residents

Author: Melissa Mitchell

Published Date:August 20, 2009

When most people think of parks, images of slides and swings, ball fields and basketball hoops, Rollerbladers and moms pushing strollers may come to mind. But in some urban neighborhoods with highly migratory immigrant populations, that image may take on a more ominous tint as the Rollerbladers and stroller-pushing mamas are replaced by gangbangers packing knives and guns, and pushing drugs.

Published Date: August 20, 2009


Study: Scientists' strategic reading of research enhanced by digital tools

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:August 18, 2009

Allen H. Renear and Carole L. Palmer, professors of library and information science at Illinois, say that as techniques originally designed to organize and share scientific data are integrated into scientific publishing, scientists' long-standing practice of reading "strategically" will be dramatically enhanced.

Published Date: August 18, 2009


Some aspects of birding not always environmentally friendly, professor says

Author: Melissa Mitchell

Published Date:August 18, 2009

A University of Illinois professor, who also watches and studies bird-watchers, suggests that the popular pastime known as competitive birding that is, participation in various types of activities based around the goal of identifying and/or listing the greatest number of avian species may not be as eco-friendly as it purports to be.

Published Date: August 18, 2009


Sotomayor held to different standard of objectivity, media scholar says

Author: Craig Chamberlain

Published Date:July 15, 2009

For Judge Sonia Sotomayor, just being Latina means her objectivity is in question.That’s the message that stands out to University of Illinois professor Isabel Molina-Guzmn in too much of the coverage so far of the Supreme Court nominee, whose confirmation hearings began Monday.

Published Date: July 15, 2009


Making data more accessible could create more accountable government

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:May 14, 2009

President Barack Obama’s pledge to make his presidency the most open and accountable administration in history could come true if his administration embraces open data formats to make government information accessible to all, says a University of Illinois expert in information science.

Published Date: May 14, 2009


TV news on organ donation says little about need, how to become a donor

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 31, 2009

More than 100,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for an organ transplant, and an average of 17 die waiting each day, but according to a University of Illinois communication professor TV news says little about need for organ donations nor how to become a donor.

Published Date: March 31, 2009


Most effective zoning policies take regional concerns into account

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:March 16, 2009

It’s not unusual for governments of neighboring communities to work cooperatively in planning and building transportation infrastructure or tackling environmental issues. But when it comes to zoning matters, most municipalities have adopted an approach best characterized by the Warren Zevon song “Splendid Isolation.”

Published Date: March 16, 2009


Odds are, seedings don't matter after Sweet Sixteen, U. of I. professor says

Author: Phil Ciciora, News Editor

Published Date:March 16, 2009

For budding “bracketologists” busily weighing picks for their annual March Madness office pool, a University of Illinois professor has some advice on how to pick winners: In the later rounds of the tournament, ignore a team’s seeding, which is a statistically insignificant predictor of a team’s chances of winning.

Published Date: March 16, 2009


Keys to Obama speeches: clarity, structure and making sense of the world

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 27, 2009

Presidential rhetoric expert John Murphy says there's a "pretty direct train of influence from FDR to Kennedy to Reagan to Obama. All four talk to us in ways that respect our intelligence, that make us feel like we are worthy of being American citizens.”

Published Date: February 27, 2009


Chinatowns project unrealistic image of China, study shows

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:February 11, 2009

Recreation, sport and tourism researchers have found that Chinatowns project an unrealistic image of China, but it's an image that residents and visitors mutually negotiate satisfactorily.

Published Date: February 11, 2009


Disruptions in daily routine can adversely affect a couple's conversation

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:February 9, 2009

It may be the little things you’re not doing in daily routines that are playing a part in strained communication within couples, says researcher Leanne Knobloch. Things like forgetting to walk the dog or fuel the car or take out the trash.

Published Date: February 9, 2009


Super Bowl ads will reflect tough economy, says advertising professor

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 28, 2009

Fewer cars. More horses. A softer sell. That’s just part of what viewers can expect in Sunday’s “Super Bowl of advertising,” as companies adjust their marketing in a very down market, says Jan Slater, a branding expert and the head of the department of advertising at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: January 28, 2009


Integrated town that predates Civil War earns landmark status

Author: Jan Dennis, News Editor

Published Date:January 22, 2009

New Philadelphia, a lost western Illinois town where blacks and whites lived together in peace and freedom a quarter of a century before the Civil War, has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior.

Published Date: January 22, 2009


Study looks at how mental health care affects outcomes for foster children

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:January 13, 2009

A new study co-written by social work professors at Illinois followed 5,978 children in foster care in Illinois for several years to determine whether these children’s placement and permanency outcomes were affected by their histories of intensive mental health treatment.

Published Date: January 13, 2009


Scholar's new book examines cultural forces behind Obama's victory

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:January 13, 2009

Jabari Asim, a scholar-in-residence at Illinois is the author of “What Obama Means” (William Morrow), being published on Inauguration Day. Asim thought a black president was inevitable. Just not quite so soon.

Published Date: January 13, 2009


'Recovery coaches' effective in reducing number of babies exposed to drugs

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:January 5, 2009

A groundbreaking study led by Joseph P. Ryan in the School of Social Work at Illinois indicates that recovery coaches can significantly reduce the number of substance-exposed births as well as help reunite substance-involved families, saving state child-welfare systems millions of dollars in foster-care and other placement costs.

Published Date: January 5, 2009


Changes in White House documents raise concern about rewriting history

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:November 25, 2008

The Bush White House has been rewriting part of its history, according to University of Illinois researchers Scott Althaus (ALL’-touse) and Kalev Leetaru (KAHL’-iv lee-TAR-oo). It “has quietly deleted or modified key documents in the public record that are maintained under its direct control,” they write, in a report posted online this week and cited in a story in The New York Times.

Published Date: November 25, 2008


Intervention project helps foster children affected by parents' meth issues

Published Date:November 12, 2008

A narrative- and relationship-based intervention implemented by child-welfare professionals in Illinois has helped foster children in the rural Midwest begin recovering from the traumatic experiences associated with their parents’ misuse and/or manufacture of methamphetamine by recruiting people in the children’s communities to help them to talk about and better understand the problems that so profoundly affected their lives.

Published Date: November 12, 2008


Quality, quantity lacking in children's educational TV, study says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:November 12, 2008

Commercial broadcasters are doing the “bare minimum and not much more” for children’s educational programming, according to University of Illinois communication professor Barbara Wilson, one of two lead researchers on a study released today (Nov. 12) by the organization Children Now.

Published Date: November 12, 2008


Illinois launches I-STEM Initiative

Author: Phil Ciciora, Education Editor

Published Date:November 10, 2008

The launch of Sputnik in 1957 served as a wake-up call for Eisenhower-era America to train more scientists and engineers. Officials at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hope their new I-STEM Initiative has the same effect.

Published Date: November 10, 2008


'No Child' law gets an 'F' from education professor at Illinois

Author: Phil Ciciora, Education Editor

Published Date:November 5, 2008

The controversial No Child Left Behind law has forced teachers in low-income school districts to craft a curriculum that marginalizes writing at the expense of teaching to the test, resulting in educators who feel straitjacketed by a high-stakes test, according to a U. of I. education professor who has studied the issue.

Published Date: November 5, 2008


Personality shapes perception of romance, but doesn't tell the whole story

Author: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 30, 2008

In a new analysis, researchers at the University of Illinois found that measuring the quality of romantic relationships is more complex than these earlier studies suggest. While personality has been found to be predictive of perceived relationship satisfaction and success, other measures of relationship quality may offer additional insight into how a romantic relationship is functioning.

Published Date: October 30, 2008


News flash: Candidates' ads actually match deeds in Congress

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:October 27, 2008

If you think candidates never keep their promises and will say anything to get elected, you’re certainly not alone. And you’re not right, either.

Published Date: October 27, 2008


Education debate tonight at Columbia a duel of 'fundamental opposites'

Author: Phil Ciciora, Education Editor

Published Date:October 21, 2008

If there’s one issue the candidates have been near silent on in the run-up to Election Day, it’s education. But when the education advisers for John McCain and Barack Obama square off in a surrogate debate about where their candidate stands on the issues tonight (Oct. 21), it will be a battle of “fundamental opposites” on the educational policy spectrum, says James D. Anderson, the Gutsgell Professor of educational policy studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: October 21, 2008


Pending federal legislation would benefit foster children, save millions

Author: Sharita Forrest, News Editor

Published Date:October 8, 2008

Illinois and other states could save tens of millions of dollars in administrative costs and find safe, permanent homes for thousands more foster children each year if pending federal legislation is signed by President George W. Bush.

Published Date: October 8, 2008


The Road to the White House: 2008 Election Experts

Published Date:September 17, 2008

Expert sources at the University of Illinois on issues relating to the 2008 elections

Published Date: September 17, 2008


Climate change could be impetus for wars, other conflicts, expert says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 21, 2008

Hurricane season has arrived, sparking renewed debate regarding possible links between global warming and the frequency and severity of hurricanes, heat waves and other extreme weather events.

Published Date: August 21, 2008


Negative perception of blacks rises with more news watching, studies say

Author: Craig Chamberlain

Published Date:July 17, 2008

Watching the news should make you more informed, but it also may be making you more likely to stereotype, says a University of Illinois researcher.

Published Date: July 17, 2008


Fear of Germany's destruction drove Nazism's appeal, scholar says

Author: Craig Chamberlain

Published Date:June 17, 2008

eventy-five years after the Nazis rose to power, historians still struggle to explain how the Nazis could take such effective hold of Germany and bring it to such murderous extremes in war and in the Holocaust.

Published Date: June 17, 2008


Obama faces stiff challenges, even if Democrats unite, U. of I. expert says

Author: Craig Chamberlain

Published Date:June 3, 2008

History shows Democrats will unite behind Barack Obama, but the party’s likely nominee faces a tougher challenge than many expect in his bid to become the nation’s first black president, a University of Illinois political expert says.

Published Date: June 3, 2008


Reality TV provides an education for self-help citizenship, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:May 13, 2008

Many things have been said about reality TV, but “educational” has rarely been among them. Yet whether we realize it or not, shows from “Survivor” to “The Apprentice” to the more-recent “Oprah’s Big Give” are imparting lessons for an age of scaled-down and reinvented government, says University of Illinois professor and author James Hay.

Published Date: May 13, 2008


Scholars examine forces strengthening, threatening democracies

Author: Jeff Unger, News Bureau

Published Date:May 12, 2008

At the dawn of the 21st century, democracy as a form of government was ascendant. The wealthiest nations were democracies, and democratization was well under way in southern and eastern Europe, and in Latin America. And yet …

Published Date: May 12, 2008


U.S. no longer superpower, now a besieged global power, scholars say

Author: Jeff Unger, News Bureau

Published Date:May 8, 2008

he United States remains a formidable but besieged global power, according to the editors of “From Superpower to Besieged Global Power: Restoring World Order After the Failure of the Bush Doctrine” (University of Georgia Press).

Published Date: May 8, 2008


Lost Illinois town offers lessons for race relations in America, expert says

Author: Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2008

Democratic frontrunner Barack Obama delivered what many consider the signature speech of his candidacy last month in Philadelphia, pleading for straightforward talk about race as ethnic rumblings dogged his historic bid to become the nation’s first black president.

Published Date: May 1, 2008


Poll: Most still undecided about constitutional convention for Illinois

Author: Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:April 15, 2008

Support is lagging for Illinois’ first constitutional convention in four decades, but could get a boost from growing unrest over political in-fighting that many citizens fear has paralyzed state government, according to a new University of Illinois poll.

Published Date: April 15, 2008


How local issues escalate into significant battles is focus of new project

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:April 14, 2008

Social scientists at the University of Illinois are collaborating on a project that seeks to gain new insights on why and how seemingly small, geographically localized disputes can quickly ignite into border-crossing regional conflicts, and even global wars.

Published Date: April 14, 2008


Smoking ban has stirred strong passions, but will soon fade, expert says

Author: Jan Dennis, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:December 13, 2007

A looming ban that will snuff out smoking in public places across Illinois lit up a fiery debate that rivaled abortion, gun control and society's other hottest-button issues, a University of Illinois research scientist says.

Published Date: December 13, 2007


Symposium to focus on 60th anniversary of India's independence

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:October 23, 2007

As India celebrates 60 years of independence from British rule, an ever-evolving set of economic, environmental, political and cultural challenges lies ahead for the world's largest democracy.

Published Date: October 23, 2007


Professor: Communication system at critical juncture, time for action is now

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:October 15, 2007

Our communication system is rapidly transforming before our eyes. But we don't have to just watch, University of Illinois professor Bob McChesney says in a new book. In fact, we shouldn't.

Published Date: October 15, 2007


Professor: Communication system at critical juncture, time for action is now

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:October 15, 2007

Our communication system is rapidly transforming before our eyes. But we don't have to just watch, University of Illinois professor Bob McChesney says in a new book. In fact, we shouldn't.

Published Date: October 15, 2007


Mike Wallace of CBS to receive lifetime achievement award in journalism

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:October 9, 2007

"60 Minutes" newsman Mike Wallace will be the first recipient of the Illinois Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism, to be awarded Saturday (Oct. 13) in New York.

Published Date: October 9, 2007


Rare Hear It Now recordings lend insight on Murrow and news history

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:September 26, 2007

The 1950s program "See It Now," hosted by Edward R. Murrow, has earned a place in the early history of television news. Most recently it was the setting for the 2005 movie "Good Night and Good Luck," in which Murrow famously clashed with U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy.

Published Date: September 26, 2007


With booming economy in China comes unexpected offshoot: beauty pageants

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:September 20, 2007

There she is ... Miss China?

Published Date: September 20, 2007


Oh, my goth - dark, cultural phenomenon thriving, scholars say

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:September 18, 2007

Occasional fashion-mag spreads aside, punk, as a subcultural phenomenon, is toast.

Published Date: September 18, 2007


Study explores link between cannabis use on vacation and daily life

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 23, 2007

Don't be surprised if some of your colleagues and acquaintances aren't exactly forthcoming about how they spent their summer vacations.

Published Date: August 23, 2007


Decade of Urbana Daily Courier to be available online

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:July 25, 2007

The University of Illinois Library has digitally opened yet another window to the past.

Published Date: July 25, 2007


Missile proposal signals start of defensive arms race, scholar says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:June 14, 2007

On the eve of the Group of 8 summit that took place in Germany earlier this month, the world watched anxiously as the U.S. and Russian presidents engaged in a rhetorical sparring match over plans by the United States to roll out a third missile defense system, this time in Europe.

Published Date: June 14, 2007


Focus of TV news on black lawbreakers creates stereotypes for viewers

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:May 24, 2007

A new double study of TV viewers'perceptions of race and crime following exposure to "racialized crime news" provides more evidence of the negative long-term effects of news viewing that over-represents black lawbreakers.

Published Date: May 24, 2007


Video gaming magazines' depictions of male strength influences boys

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:May 17, 2007

Researchers have found a surprising cultural influence on some boys' drive for muscularity.

Published Date: May 17, 2007


U. of I. names prominent journalist to fill chair in investigative reporting

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:May 11, 2007

Brant Houston, the executive director of Investigative Reporters and Editors Inc. (IRE), has been named to the Knight Chair for Investigative and Enterprise Reporting at the University of Illinois, pending approval by the U. of I. Board of Trustees at its May 17 meeting in Chicago.

Published Date: May 11, 2007


Neoliberal policies of the '90s have worsened Rust Belt's black ghettos

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:March 27, 2007

The brighter that city-centers in the northern U.S. glow, the rustier the ghettos in those cities become.

Published Date: March 27, 2007


Investigative reporting back in style, with bright future, professor says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:March 12, 2007

The news business may be in constant turmoil these days, but investigative reporting is alive and well, says a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner who is writing his second textbook on the subject, due out in June.

Published Date: March 12, 2007


Natural-disaster recovery expert hopeful about New Orleans plan

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:August 18, 2006

As an urban planning researcher who studies how cities rebuild following natural disasters, Rob Olshansky has kept his scholar's eye keenly focused on redevelopment plots and subplots surfacing this past year in post-Katrina New Orleans.

Published Date: August 18, 2006


Study: Demographic shifts require fresh approach to city planning

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:August 7, 2006

For some residents of La Habra, Calif., a clothesline was what it was: a convenient, inexpensive way to dry laundry.

Published Date: August 7, 2006


Study elicits 'child's eye' view of methamphetamine abuse and its effects

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:June 12, 2006

The children's stories are distressing: They had been left alone and hungry for days, were physically abused, forced to get high, told to steal from loved ones and to lie to authorities, and they had seen their parents "hyper" and delusional.

Published Date: June 12, 2006


Shifting makeup of population in Illinois certain to affect policy choices

Author: Mark Reutter, Business & Law Editor

Published Date:May 17, 2006

A look at the state's changing demographics offers some clues as to how Illinois lawmakers may handle public policy choices in the future, according to researchers at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: May 17, 2006


Struggles of 'temporary migrants' documented by U. of I. researchers

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:April 7, 2006

Across the United States, hundreds of thousands of newly empowered Latino immigrants have been stepping out of the shadows, taking to the streets and moving into the public-policy spotlight in recent weeks with their vocal opposition to proposed legislation aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration.

Published Date: April 7, 2006


Child-welfare study shows recovery coaches can help reunite families

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:March 10, 2006

On any given day, as many as 70 percent of the Illinois children in foster care are in that situation, at least in part, because their parents abuse drugs or alcohol. Only a small percentage will ever be reunited with their parents.

Published Date: March 10, 2006


Many new immigrants to U.S. change diet -- and not for the better

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:February 9, 2006

Coming to the land of milk and honey can be hazardous to new immigrants' diet and health.

Published Date: February 9, 2006


Bird flu poses threat to international security, U. of I. scholar says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:January 24, 2006

In the past, when government leaders, policymakers and scholars have turned their attention to peace and security issues, the talk invariably has focused on war, arms control or anti-terrorism strategies. But Julian Palmore believes it's time to expand the scope of the conversation.

Published Date: January 24, 2006


Methamphetamine's ruinous effects on children documented in midwest study

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:February 2, 2005

In its destructive effect on rural families and their children, methamphetamine may be in a class of its own, based on the first study from an ongoing research project in seven Central Illinois counties, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: February 2, 2005


Holiday season brings joy to Illinois community focused on foster children

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:December 22, 2004

For a small Illinois community dedicated to saving foster children, the Christmas season has been unusually merry and bright.

Published Date: December 22, 2004


Feminism has suffered because of its views on beauty and fashion, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:December 14, 2004

Feminism needs to end its long obsession with the politics of personal appearance, and get past its dim view of beauty, says author Linda Scott, who describes herself as a feminist.

Published Date: December 14, 2004


Child-welfare web site gives caseworkers first-time access to data

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:November 17, 2004

Child-welfare caseworkers tend to focus on daily crises.

Published Date: November 17, 2004


Pro sports stadiums don't bolster local economies, scholars say

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:November 17, 2004

If you build it, they will come ... with wallets bulging, eager to exchange greenbacks for peanuts, popcorn, hot dogs and beer, and T-shirts and ball caps with team logos.

Published Date: November 17, 2004


Voter turnout in Tuesday's election unlikely to have been higher than in 1992

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:November 3, 2004

Despite the widespread assumption that voter turnout was substantially higher in the 2004 presidential election than it was in the 2000 election, "the numbers suggest a different story," says Scott Althaus, a professor of speech communication and political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who conducts research on the effects of presidential campaigns.

Published Date: November 3, 2004


Europeans view U.S. missile defense system with interest, skepticism, expert says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:October 27, 2004

With the Bush administration poised to announce activation of its missile-defense system by the end of this year, the European community is eyeing the program with equal doses of interest and skepticism, according to Julian Palmore, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign professor who specializes in international security issues.

Published Date: October 27, 2004


If you thought Florida was bad -- wait till there's a tie in the Electoral College

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:October 25, 2004

While national preference polls are shedding little light on the outcome of the 2004 presidential race, state-level polls and electoral history can yield important insights, including "some unsettling possible outcomes in next month's election."

Published Date: October 25, 2004


Financial education programs would benefit low-income people, scholars say

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:October 11, 2004

Personal finance education is a growing trend in schools and workplaces, but it misses many of those who need it most, say social work professors Steve Anderson and Min Zhan.

Published Date: October 11, 2004


Information system to help scientists analyze mechanisms of social behavior

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 16, 2004

With a $5 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will create BeeSpace, a system to help scientists analyze all sources of information relevant to the mechanisms of social behavior.

Published Date: September 16, 2004


Polls, not Bush Administration, helped shape Americans' bias against Saddam

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:September 9, 2004

Why were so many Americans, as early as the first anniversary of Sept. 11, convinced that Saddam Hussein was behind the terrorist attacks in the United States? Did their mistaken belief that the Iraqi dictator was responsible for the attacks result from the Bush administration's information campaign to convince the public to go to war in Iraq, or was something else at work?

Published Date: September 9, 2004


Media policy to be focus of new initiative at Illinois

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:August 31, 2004

Media policy issues will be getting increased attention at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a result of a new research initiative supported by $234,000 from a recording artists organization.

Published Date: August 31, 2004


People's concept of 'land ethic' linked to attitudes of use vs. conservation

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 23, 2004

Bill Stewart believes that everybody - from the trail-mix-munching hiking enthusiast to the SUV-driving mall-shopper - has what he calls a "land ethic, whether they know it or not."

Published Date: August 23, 2004


Presidential vote expert gives Democrats 'distinct electoral advantage'

Author: Andrea Lynn, News Editor and Peter Nardulli, political science

Published Date:July 23, 2004

History has some good news for the Democrats on the eve of their convention next week in Boston.

Published Date: July 23, 2004


Movies elevate, rather than denigrate, journalism and reporters, author says

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:June 16, 2004

Are movies to blame for the public's low opinion of reporters and journalism? Has the Hollywood portrayal of the news business grown harsher in recent decades?

Published Date: June 16, 2004


If you want to help your children with homework, take it easy, studies suggest

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 11, 2004

What can parents do to help children doing poorly in school? Two new studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suggest that supporting their children's autonomy and refraining from being controlling will help kids do better on their homework and raise their grades.

Published Date: May 11, 2004


Bush administration has used 27 rationales for war in Iraq, study says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:May 10, 2004

If it seems that there have been quite a few rationales for going to war in Iraq, that's because there have been quite a few - 27, in fact, all floated between Sept. 12, 2001, and Oct. 11, 2002, according to a new study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All but four of the rationales originated with the administration of President George W. Bush.

Published Date: May 10, 2004


Professor's new book outlines citizens' case for media reform

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:April 5, 2004

Robert McChesney and other reformers have been talking for years about media politics, but few were listening.

Published Date: April 5, 2004


Parents need to listen to their teens before the teens will listen to them

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:March 18, 2004

Those public service ads that advise parents to "just talk to their teenagers about drugs - they'll listen" should come with a warning label, says the author of a new and path-breaking study.

Published Date: March 18, 2004


Seminars examine issues involving immigration and globalization

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:March 3, 2004

Immigration law. Haitians. Guantánamo Bay. Hispanic voters. Mexico. Temporary work permits. Cuba. Nafta. Sept. 11. The Patriot Act.

Published Date: March 3, 2004


Low-income parents often prefer license-exempt child care, study indicates

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:February 9, 2004

All low-income working parents in Illinois can get subsidized child care, under one of the most comprehensive programs in the nation, but more than half the parents get that subsidized care from providers exempted from state licensing.

Published Date: February 9, 2004


Maltreated children more likely to engage in delinquent behavior

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:January 13, 2004

Children who have experienced maltreatment are significantly more likely to engage in delinquent behavior, according to a unique new study matching child welfare and juvenile court records from Chicago and its Cook County suburbs.

Published Date: January 13, 2004


Americans most misinformed about global warming

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2003

Despite huge differences in all kinds of resources, citizens of poorer developing countries have essentially the same level of knowledge about the sources of global warming as citizens of richer developed countries - and that level isn't very high.

Published Date: September 1, 2003


Rising interest in farm-related leisure activities benefiting Illinois

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2003

Move over corn and beans, cattle and hogs. Make way for reindeer herds and Christmas trees, trail rides and trout ponds, produce stands and pumpkin patches, corn mazes and petting zoos - and tourists - sometimes by the busload.

Published Date: August 1, 2003


Travel writers tend to perpetuate cultural stereotypes for tourists

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2003

Picture this: You're on vacation in Portugal, strolling through the winding streets of a quaint village, described in a travel story you read in your hometown newspaper as an "enchanted paradise - where time stands still." Suddenly you witness two locals engaged in a loud, boisterous verbal exchange, which you perceive as some kind of argument.

Published Date: August 1, 2003


Reporters' terminology affects gentrification

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2003

A new study of gentrification in U.S. cities focuses on the activities of a surprising group of players - not developers, not even politicians, but newspaper reporters.

Published Date: July 1, 2003


Muslim American's leisure activities affected after 9/11

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2003

In the days and weeks following 9/11, it was widely reported that many Muslim Americans were the targets of discriminatory acts - from obscene gestures and rude remarks to vandalism and physical violence. Not so widely known, perhaps, were the ways in which such threats impacted Muslim Americans' everyday lives, including their participation in leisure activities.

Published Date: June 1, 2003


Students create unique atlas documenting world hunger

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2003

Few college students can crow that their semester project resulted in an original - not to mention significant - publication.

Published Date: June 1, 2003


Day of terror a 'call to arms' for political dissent, scholars say

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2003

A new book about 9/11, written by 50 professors soon after the horrific event, serves as a clarion call - not to a war on terrorism - but to dissent, dissent against U.S. policies that may have made the event possible, that are continuing to make the world a dangerous place.

Published Date: May 1, 2003


Journalism professor, students identify 'Deep Throat'

Author: Craig Chamberlain, News Editor

Published Date:April 22, 2003

The identity of "Deep Throat" is no longer a mystery, at least not for one investigative journalism class at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: April 22, 2003


'Curvaceously thin' body the ideal, scholar finds

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities & Social Sciences Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2003

36-24-36. It sounds like the combination for a safe or lock, and in a way, it is. Those numbers have long been regarded as the right combination for the ideal female body.

Published Date: March 1, 2003


'Church mother' offers rarely studied perspective on child rearing

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2002

For the storytelling and the story – but also for the perspective it would bring to faculty peers and students – Edith Hudley's wisdom is now in print as "Raise Up a Child: Human Development in an African-American Family" (Lyceum Books).

Published Date: December 1, 2002


Preschool curriculum uses stories and art to build a love of books

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2002

Preparing preschoolers to read - and to love reading - means more than minding their Ps and Qs.

Published Date: December 1, 2002


Program aims to revitalize Afghanistan's agricultural economy

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2002

A year after the Taliban were ousted from power in Afghanistan, concerns have been raised about the failure to initiate adequate relief and development efforts in the region.

Published Date: December 1, 2002


Reining in 'ravers' a matter of keeping them safe, scholar says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2002

The passions and practices of youthful revelers drawn to the so-called rave culture are causing some members of the dominant culture to do some raving of their own. And a fair amount of ranting and hand-wringing, too.

Published Date: December 1, 2002


Ignorance of kin-care system has hindered its encouragement

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2002

Operating largely outside the radar of white America, grandparents in the black community have found homes and effectively raised children in ways that have eluded established foster-care and welfare programs.

Published Date: November 1, 2002


Americans as apathetic now about world news as they were pre-9/11

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

Americans are no more attentive today to news of the world than they were before the Sept. 11 attacks, according to a new study in the September issue of PS: Political Science & Politics. The study by Scott Althaus, a professor of speech communication and political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is part of a special issue of the journal devoted to civic engagement since the terrorist attacks on the United States a year ago. The Althaus study, "American News Consumption During Times of National Crisis," is available at http://apsanet.org/PS/sept02/althaus.cfm.

Published Date: October 1, 2002


Why groups target 'Others' a topic worthy of study, scholar says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

Not surprisingly, the grandson of the Mahatma Gandhi has spent a lot of time over the last year reflecting on terrorism, war and peace. One of the things that has puzzled Rajmohan Gandhi is the "apparent absence of Abraham Lincoln from the 9/11 discourse."

Published Date: October 1, 2002


Authors of new book urge public to reclaim control of its media

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

It's supposed to be our media, not the media of a few large corporations. It's now a media that no longer serves us well. And we, the public, want it back.

Published Date: October 1, 2002


Memoir reflects on hunting, family, friendship and life

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

It's a story of crisp autumn mornings tromping through the Kentucky countryside, and of men and the nature of friendship. It's a story of driving ambition, and contemplating what is lost and gained in an obsession with "making it," versus a life staying put.

Published Date: October 1, 2002


Memoir reflects on hunting, family, friendship and life

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

It's a story of crisp autumn mornings tromping through the Kentucky countryside, and of men and the nature of friendship. It's a story of driving ambition, and contemplating what is lost and gained in an obsession with "making it," versus a life staying put.

Published Date: October 1, 2002


U.S. moving closer to approving international women's rights bill

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2002

More than two decades after an international treaty on women's rights was drafted, then effectively mothballed in the United States by a senate committee, prospects for U.S. ratification are at long last beginning to look up, says an expert in international women's issues at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: October 1, 2002


Fairness of sibling treatment key to its impact, study shows

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:September 24, 2002

The sibling getting favored treatment from mom and dad feels great and has the best self-esteem, right? Not necessarily, researchers say. If a favored sibling doesn't think the preferential treatment is deserved, that child may actually suffer.

Published Date: September 24, 2002


Sept. 11 hasn't changed public's attentiveness to news, study reveals

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor and Scott Althaus, assistant professor of speech communication and political science

Published Date:September 9, 2002

Americans are no more attentive today to news of the world than they were before the Sept. 11 attacks, according to a study just released in the September issue of PS: Political Science & Politics. The study by Scott Althaus, a professor of speech communication and political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is part of a special issue of the journal devoted to civic engagement since the terrorist attacks on the United States nearly a year ago. The issue is available online at http://www.apsanet.org/PS/sept02/toc.cfm. The Althaus study, "American News Consumption During Times of National Crisis," is available at http://www.apsanet.org/PS/sept02/althaus.cfm.

Published Date: September 9, 2002


Guardianship as an option gets more children into permanent homes

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

Relatives acting as foster parents often can provide a permanent home for children. The options for doing that are adoption and legal guardianship.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Guardianship as an option gets more children into permanent homes

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

Relatives acting as foster parents often can provide a permanent home for children. The options for doing that are adoption and legal guardianship.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Clash of values at crux of debate over landscape aesthetics

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

Scenic landscapes - the type most people reportedly enjoy most - are increasingly falling out of fashion in some quarters. And that view may be out of focus, according to Russ Parsons, a professor of landscape architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Clash of values at crux of debate over landscape aesthetics

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

Scenic landscapes - the type most people reportedly enjoy most - are increasingly falling out of fashion in some quarters. And that view may be out of focus, according to Russ Parsons, a professor of landscape architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Criticism of planned communities as social engineering unjustified

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

After years of media reports about it, the planned community of Seaside, Fla., has become something of a poster child for a brand of city planning known as New Urbanism. But for a trend that's received so much attention, too few people really understand what it's all about, says Emily Talen, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Standard polls on social welfare issues 'nearly worthless,' scholar says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:September 1, 2002

Although most Americans face hard economic realities every day - the laws of supply and demand, the price of gasoline - there is one part of modern life that offers "diplomatic immunity" from price tags and even the most basic economic principles.

Published Date: September 1, 2002


Decline of independent newspapers is theme of September symposium

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2002

Independent, family-owned newspapers now represent only about one in six papers in the United States, with the rest under corporate ownership.

Published Date: August 1, 2002


How social scientists, humanists can better use computers is book focus

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2002

The editor of a new book about computing thinks of his publication as a bridge for colleagues who are wary of the far side of technology.

Published Date: August 1, 2002


Journalism professors learning reporting skills in summer workshop

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2002

They've been going to Eastern Europe since the fall of communism: journalists from the West ready to train working reporters how to do their jobs in a free society.

Published Date: August 1, 2002


Misdirected e-mail shows people still unclear about medium's norms

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2002

In the past, the misdirected office memo could trigger red faces and pink slips. Now, it's the rogue e-mail message that can get a person in hot water.

Published Date: August 1, 2002


Race a factor in post-war house and garden trends, scholar asserts

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2002

Across America, the residential landscape is still dotted with ample examples from the post-World War II housing boom. And according to University of Illinois landscape architecture professor Dianne Harris, there's a lot of history behind the picture windows of those 1950s and '60s ramblers and ranch houses.

Published Date: August 1, 2002


Danger of 'dirty bombs' exaggerated, expert on security says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2002

A University of Illinois professor who specializes in arms control and international security issues says reports about the danger of so-called "dirty bombs" sensationalized the facts about such weapons, planting new and largely unwarranted fears in the minds of Americans.

Published Date: July 1, 2002


Illinois caseworkers now have information they need online

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2002

The stack of pages stands as tall as the person who has to use it. It's everything a child welfare worker in Illinois needs to know or reference, and it's always changing, with each new rule, procedure, law, etc.

Published Date: June 1, 2002


Plant a garden, help grow a community, professors' study shows

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2002

As interest in community gardening continues to flourish in many urban areas, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suspect participants are reaping far more than just fresh, homegrown vegetables.

Published Date: June 1, 2002


Scholars to gather to discuss projects by Social Security grant

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2002

The status of current and future research aimed at informing policy decisions by the U.S. Social Security Administration will top the agenda when researchers affiliated with the Disability Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and policy analysts from the SSA and other government agencies convene at DRI's annual symposium June 6.

Published Date: June 1, 2002


Study examines issues faced by teen-agers who move to the U.S.

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2002

Unlike their American peers who sometimes wish their parents would suddenly become invisible, many teen-agers who emigrate from Poland to the United States actually complain that they don't get to see Mom or Dad enough.

Published Date: June 1, 2002


Medical care and hunger key for those leaving, returning to welfare

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2002

The 1996 welfare-reform act was designed to get people off welfare and into the workforce. The dramatic reduction in caseloads that followed seemed to indicate that was happening.

Published Date: March 1, 2002


Medical care and hunger key for those leaving, returning to welfare

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2002

The 1996 welfare-reform act was designed to get people off welfare and into the workforce. The dramatic reduction in caseloads that followed seemed to indicate that was happening.

Published Date: March 1, 2002


Public's confidence in official sources of information key in health scare

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2002

Researchers have long theorized that people react to health scares such as contaminated food or recalled tires in a straightforward way - they assess their chance of being exposed to the problem and then act to limit their risk.

Published Date: March 1, 2002


Media ignore research-based advice that would smooth sibling ties

Published Date:February 1, 2002

Two University of Illinois researchers duly note in a new study that welcoming a second child into a family and helping the children establish sibling relationships involves many challenging tasks. Unfortunately, they say, the advice parents are getting falls short.

Published Date: February 1, 2002


Students getting hands-on experience designing unique tours

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2002

For students enrolled in University of Illinois professor Bruce Wicks' leisure studies seminars, just learning about tourism can be an adventure.

Published Date: February 1, 2002


Students getting hands-on experience designing unique tours

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2002

For students enrolled in University of Illinois professor Bruce Wicks' leisure studies seminars, just learning about tourism can be an adventure.

Published Date: February 1, 2002


Caseworkers now can find real-world experience online

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2001

Checklists and formulas don't work in child welfare. Investigating claims of child abuse and neglect is a very-human, complex business where facts are rarely certain and any remedy carries risks.

Published Date: November 1, 2001


Caseworkers now can find real-world experience online

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2001

Checklists and formulas don't work in child welfare. Investigating claims of child abuse and neglect is a very-human, complex business where facts are rarely certain and any remedy carries risks.

Published Date: November 1, 2001


Overdosing on news can be bad for one's mental health, scholar says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2001

In these uncertain times, what do authorities on uncertainty management advise?

Published Date: November 1, 2001


Adversaries would find other attack methods, game theory shows

Author: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor

Published Date:August 1, 2001

As Congress ponders a $3 billion increase in funding for a national missile defense system, University of Illinois professor Julian Palmore is looking at the program's prospects for success from a mathematician's perspective.

Published Date: August 1, 2001


Life at home key in determining child's drive for success, study shows

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

Persist, adapt to challenges, succeed. Why does such tenacity work for one child but not another? A new study suggests that life at home - family stability, parenting styles and stressful experiences - drives how a child behaves and pursues success in academics and relationships.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Marketplace plays key role in leisure, even for children, scholar says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

Marketplace plays key role in leisure, even for children, scholar says.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Study projects dollar value of annual quake damage in Los Angeles

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

Residents of Los Angeles County go through life generally accepting the reality that an earthquake could shake up their world at any time. And they know that the costs associated with a major earthquake could be astronomical.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Comprehensive planning should yield to variety of plans, scholar says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

University of Illinois urban and regional planning professor Lew Hopkins says that if there's a sacred cow in his profession it's the comprehensive plan.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Newspapers, Web news both shortchange public and democracy

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

The news about news isn't good. U.S. newspapers not only are failing readers, they also are failing democracy. Internet news is an equally poor messenger, similarly tainted by the "advancing power of the news corporation." So say the authors of a new critique of the news media from colonial times to cyberspacial.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Universities team with towns to give kids summer activity programs

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2001

llinois is known for its recreation programs. The state's system of locally run urban park districts is considered among the best in the country.

Published Date: July 1, 2001


Internet often a land of missed opportunity for tourism bureaus

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2001

Tourism is the largest industry in the world, and the largest seller of products and services through the Internet, says Daniel Fesenmaier, director of the National Laboratory for Tourism and eCommerce at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: June 1, 2001


Successful housing program for seniors badly underfunded, survey says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2001

It's no secret that the U.S. population is rapidly aging. Not so well known, however, according to University of Illinois professor Leonard Heumann, is that the nation's most successful housing program for the elderly is grossly underfunded, and consequently, failing to meet current and future demand.

Published Date: June 1, 2001


Book chronicles cultural wars between France and United States

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2001

While nearly 3 million Americans travel to France each year, and more than a million French citizens come to U.S. shores annually, it is unlikely that many of the tourists realize that they are entering enemy territory. In his new book, "French Resistance: The French-American Culture Wars" (University of Minnesota Press), Jean-Philippe Mathy offers a salvo-by-salvo analysis of the culture wars now being fought by the intellectuals and journalists of both countries.

Published Date: May 1, 2001


Frail seniors could benefit from altered home environment, expert says

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2001

More and more senior citizens are choosing to remain in their homes despite the loss of physical and mental abilities, in large part thanks to the growing availability of home- and community-based care services.

Published Date: May 1, 2001


South Asian scholar program hopes to 'build bridges' among nations

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2001

An international relations specialist from Bangladesh and a business administration professor from Pakistan will be the first scholars from South Asia to reap the benefits of a new program initiated by the University of Illinois.

Published Date: March 1, 2001


Uncontrolled growth gaining attention but not much regulation

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2001

Sprawl - out-of-control commercial and residential growth on urban perimeters - is increasingly grabbing the attention of urban planners, government officials, politicians and environmental policy activists. It's also creeping into everyday conversations among friends and neighbors.

Published Date: March 1, 2001


Uncontrolled growth gaining attention but not much regulation

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2001

Sprawl - out-of-control commercial and residential growth on urban perimeters - is increasingly grabbing the attention of urban planners, government officials, politicians and environmental policy activists. It's also creeping into everyday conversations among friends and neighbors.

Published Date: March 1, 2001


2000 Illinois Statistical Abstract is available

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:January 24, 2001

The 2000 Illinois Statistical Abstract has been completed by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: January 24, 2001


Program aims to help residents in East St. Louis gain access to Internet

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2000

Just as light-rail stations in East St. Louis, Ill., have helped connect low-income residents to the job market in the St. Louis area, a new program initiated by the University of Illinois and community organizations will help residents get aboard the Internet.

Published Date: December 1, 2000


Study takes close look at how teens and young adults share secrets

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:December 1, 2000

A new study finds that the secrets teens and young adults tell are remarkably similar -- regardless of the family structure in which they live: original, single-parent or "blended."

Published Date: December 1, 2000


Czech 'feminist' spirit seen in strong ties to family and career

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2000

The virtual absence of a Western-style feminist movement in former Soviet bloc countries has puzzled academics and journalists alike. Is it a case of deep-rooted patriarchy? A consequence of female oppression? Or is something else at work?

Published Date: November 1, 2000


Drive for electoral votes ignores most Latino voters, political scientist says

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:November 1, 2000

Al Gore and George W. Bush's focus on close state races has worked to the disadvantage of at least one population -- Latinos. In fact, "The election of 2000 is passing them by," said Louis DeSipio, an expert on Latino voting behaviors.

Published Date: November 1, 2000


Expert sources at the University of Illinois for the November elections

Author: Jeff Unger, News Bureau

Published Date:October 16, 2000

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Published Date: October 16, 2000


Bush and Gore hope their health plans win hearts and votets of elderly

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

The fact that the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates advocate prescription drug coverage for seniors tells us less about the future of U.S. health-care delivery than it does about the present-day clout of the nation's 33 million elderly.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Bush and Gore hope their health plans win hearts and votets of elderly

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

The fact that the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates advocate prescription drug coverage for seniors tells us less about the future of U.S. health-care delivery than it does about the present-day clout of the nation's 33 million elderly.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Halloween, like many family rituals, changing with the times

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:October 1, 2000

Contrary to what many Americans assume, Madison Avenue may not be the only force pumping up the presence and popularity of Halloween in the United States.

Published Date: October 1, 2000


Presidents often have little effect on economy, scholar claims

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2000

Presidents' and presidential candidates' claims to the contrary, U.S. presidents have very little impact on the economic progress of the country they lead.

Published Date: July 1, 2000


Scholars explore variety of child-rearing methods around world

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:July 1, 2000

A new volume of child-rearing manuals not only dispels the notion that there is one right way to bring up baby, but also challenges the idea that parents need such advice.

Published Date: July 1, 2000


Elian got attention needed by thousands of kids in public's care

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:June 1, 2000

For months the media and the nation focused on the fate of a single Cuban-born ward of the state named Elian and learned about every aspect of his life.

Published Date: June 1, 2000


'Commentators' word games cast social issues in racial terms

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2000

How is a social problem "racialized?"

Published Date: May 1, 2000


Crime can be cut by better environmental design, research suggests

Author: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor

Published Date:May 1, 2000

Criminologists and landscape architects will put their heads together over the newest discoveries in "Environment and Crime" during the annual meeting of the Environmental Design Research Association May 10-14 in San Francisco.

Published Date: May 1, 2000


Fitness crazes, sports booms often figments of media's imagination

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2000

From Jane Fonda in the mid-1980s to "Just Do It" in the '90s, Americans were on a fitness craze. Or were they?

Published Date: March 1, 2000


Research plays a key role in turning tide of foster-care crisis

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2000

For years the common wisdom in child welfare circles was that relatives of foster children generally won't adopt them, even when acting as their caretakers.

Published Date: March 1, 2000


Usual Republican and Democratic strongholds breaking with tradition

Author: Andrea Lynn, Humanities Editor

Published Date:March 1, 2000

It has all the earmarks: The U.S. senatorial race in New York should be one of the most interesting races in the country. "It also could be one of the most expensive senate races ? not just in New York, but ever," says campaign-watcher Michael Krassa.

Published Date: March 1, 2000


Abstract provides wealth of information about Land of Lincoln

Author: Mark Reutter, Business Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

"Need a Lifeline?" A million bucks is riding on the question -- what county in Illinois boasts the most number of hogs?

Published Date: February 1, 2000


People want green space, but not at the expense of their own green

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

When asked if they would support the idea of developing more green space in their communities for recreational or aesthetic purposes, people typically embrace the idea. That's because it's a warm-fuzzy concept "right up there with Mom and apple pie," according to Gerrit Knaap, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: February 1, 2000


People want green space, but not at the expense of their own green

Author: Melissa Mitchell, Arts Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

When asked if they would support the idea of developing more green space in their communities for recreational or aesthetic purposes, people typically embrace the idea. That's because it's a warm-fuzzy concept "right up there with Mom and apple pie," according to Gerrit Knaap, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Illinois.

Published Date: February 1, 2000


Welfare-to-work numbers may be hiding extensive job instability

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

Welfare rolls have shrunk dramatically in recent years, and states' surveys show that most of those who have left the rolls have jobs.

Published Date: February 1, 2000


Welfare-to-work numbers may be hiding extensive job instability

Author: Craig Chamberlain, Education Editor

Published Date:February 1, 2000

Welfare rolls have shrunk dramatically in recent years, and states' surveys show that most of those who have left the rolls have jobs.

Published Date: February 1, 2000