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  • A Few Kirsch Symposium Photos

    Photos of panels and the keynote speaker, Kim Hensley Owens, from Friday's Symposium. 

  • CWS Graduate Student Colloquium: Pamela Saunders and Katherine Flowers

    Pamela Saunders and Katherine Flowers presented at this Spring's Graduate Student Colloquium on Thursday, April 14th. 

  • The 7th Annual Gesa E. Kirsch and Center for Writing Studies Graduate Student Symposium

    Please join us for the  The 7th Annual Gesa E. Kirsch and Center for Writing Studies

    Graduate Student Symposium

    Friday, April 22 Foreign Languages Building 1080 (Lucy Ellis Lounge) 

    8:30 am-9:00 am: Welcome and Opening Remarks by Spencer Schaffner

    9:00 am-10:15 am: Communities and Spaces for Literacy Education and Rhetorical Agency

    Kaia Simon: Fathers Teaching Daughters: Literacy that Changes Family Relationships

    Maggie Shelledy: “If It Hadn’t Been for Writing, I Think I Would Have Lost My Mind:” Resilience, Love, and Writing in Prison

     Evin Groundwater: The Hegemonic Maintenance of Gaming Rhetorics of Space as White, Masculine, and Male

    Chair: Lindsay Rose Russell

    10:30 am-11:30 am: Navigating Diversity and Inclusion in Organizations, Writing Centers, and Classrooms

    Maria Carvajal: Change within the System: Felipe Ortego y Gasca and the National Council of Teachers of English

    Logan Middleton: Writing Deafness: Negotiations of Composition, Signing, and Mediated Language

     Bruce Kovanen: Writing Centers and the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing

    Chair: J. David Cisneros

    11:45 am-1:15 pm: Lunch at Bevier Cafe

     

    1:30 pm-2:30 pm: Keynote by Kim Hensley Owens, Associate Professor of English at Northern Arizona University: In Lak’ech, The Chicano Clap, and Fear: A Partial Rhetorical Autopsy of Tucson’s Now-Illegal Ethnic Studies Class

    2:45 pm-4:00 pm: Public and Professional Writing

    Donovan Bisbee: The Viability of Precedent: Social Movement Discourse and Planned Parenthood v. Casey

    Annie Kelvie: Writing in the Religious Professions: A Case Study

    Katrina Kennett: Drawing into Relation: Teacher Planning Practices for Classroom Instruction

    Chair: Eric Darnell Pritchard

     

    4:15 pm-4:45 pm: Traversing Linguistic, Ideological, and National Boundaries

              Tom McNamara & Yu-Kyung Kang

              Chair: Kelly Ritter

     

    5:00 pm: Happy Hour at Murphy’s Pub – All Welcome!

    A very special thanks to:

    Spencer Schaffner

    Symposium Planning Committee: Maria Carvajal and Katherine Flowers

    Faculty Chairs: Lindsay Rose Russell, J. David Cisneros, Eric Darnell Pritchard, and Kelly Ritter

  • CWS #4C16 Alumni Happy Hour

    Photos from our Happy Hour meetup at Neil's Bahr in Houston, during CCCC 2016.

  • CWS Spring Brownbag Series: Spencer Schaffner

     Spencer Schaffner's Brownbag Talk, "Shame Parades," from Wednesday the 30th of March is reviewed by CWS graduate student Logan Middleton

  • CWS Spring Brownbag Series: Mark Dressman

    Professor Mark Dressman (Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education) kicked off our Spring Brownbag Series with his talk “Words and Pictures: A Peircean/Saussurean Framework for Multimodal Analysis” on Wednesday March 9th. Read more about his talk here. 

  • CWS@4C16

    The 2016 Conference on College Composition and Communication is fast approaching, and we are so proud of the many scholars affiliated with the Center for Writing Studies who will be participating in workshops, roundtables, panels, and poster sessions. This year, the number of CWS faculty, graduate students, and alumni who will be presenting papers at 4Cs is so large that we cannot fit all of them in one blog post. Below is a list of those who will be presenting on Friday, April 8 and Saturday, April 9. For a list of presentations on Thursday, please see the blog post below. See you in Houston!

     

     

  • CWS@4C16

    The 2016 Conference on College Composition and Communication is fast approaching, and we are so proud of the many scholars affiliated with the Center for Writing Studies who will be participating in workshops, roundtables, panels, and poster sessions. This year, the number of CWS faculty, graduate students, and alumni who will be presenting papers at 4Cs is so large that we cannot fit all of them in one blog post. Below is a list of those who will be presenting on Thursday, April 7. For a list of presentations on Friday and Saturday, please see the blog post above. See you in Houston!

     

     

  • Deborah Brandt's Visit Postponed

    Due to today's storm, Prof. Brandt will not able to travel here in time for her Colloquium Talk tomorrow. We have decided to reschedule her visit. All of the events on her itinerary for tomorrow are cancelled. Thank you again for your support of her visit, and we look forward to hosting her sometime in the future. 

  • Reflecting on Jeff Rice's "Craft Identities"

    Last week, we were pleased to welcome to campus Jeff Rice, Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky. Professor Rice’s talk, “Craft Identities,” was part of the 2015-2016 CWS Colloquium Speaker Series. To say that Rice’s talk was about craft beer would be like saying Discipline and Punish is about prisons. It is and it isn’t. Taking craft beer as a kind of carabiner, Rice’s talk weaved through anecdotal repetitions, interruptions, and multiple beginnings, a kind of Burkean perspective by incongruity that demonstrated how identities are crafted across print, digital, and material spaces.  In “One Always Fails in Speaking of What One Loves,” Roland Barthes writes “Music constitutes a kind of primal state of pleasure: it produces a pleasure one always tries to recapture but never to explain; hence, it is the site of the pure effect, a central notion of the Stendhalian aesthetic.” If music is the degree zero in Stendahl’s Italian system, beer may be said to be the degree zero of Rice’s craft network, both signifying and producing anecdotes, identities, relationships, events.

    While there was much to reflect on in this talk (especially as someone who is herself both constructing and constructed by the network of craft beer), I find myself repeatedly returning to the role of the personal in Rice’s work, the way he stitches together pleasure, surprise, and desire with the logics and narrative gestures of both craft beer and social media. He says, “In this sense, I’m also searching for an identity outside of an industry’s identity: mine, and that of experiences that I want to share. I call this identity a “craft identity,” for it is based in the logic of craft beer, consumption shaping a sense of who I am, as well as social media, that RateBeer experience that marks my initiation into shared participation. The basis of a transmedia identity is that various items that shape who I am come from disparate sites and create conflicting, almost mythic meanings.” Through what he elsewhere calls “personal weaving,”   Rice not only explained, but performed this craft identity, through interruptions and contagions of grand narratives and by scanning not for the confident ethos of grand narratives, but for “the mystical and mythical nature of craft relationships.”

    If you'd like to listen to "Craft Identities," a recording is available to stream in the CWS Colloquium Archive