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  • Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility

    A new study of mice by scientists at the University of Illinois raises concerns about the potential impact that long-term exposure to genistein prior to conception may have on fertility and pregnancy. The study was conducted by, from left, food science and human nutrition professor William G. Helferich, comparative biosciences professor Jodi A. Flaws and animal sciences research specialist James A. Hartman.

    A new study of mice by scientists at the University of Illinois raises concerns about the potential impact that long-term exposure to genistein prior to conception may have on fertility and pregnancy. The study was conducted by, from left, food science and human nutrition professor William G. Helferich, comparative biosciences professor Jodi A. Flaws and animal sciences research specialist James A. Hartman.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes:          

    To reach Jodi Flaws, call 217-333-7933; email jflaws@illinois.edu.
    To reach William Helferich, call 217-244-5414; email helferic@illinois.edu.
    To reach Shreya Patel, email Shreya.Patel214@gmail.com.

    The paper “Preconception exposure to dietary levels of genistein affects female reproductive outcomes” is available online from ScienceDirect or the News Bureau.