blog navigation

All Results

blog posts

  • Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity

    Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois.

  • Five Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Five faculty members have been named to the 2017 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list (previously known as the Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers list). The list recognizes “leading researchers in the sciences and social sciences from around the world."

  • Deaths

    David R. Hamilton ... Bernhard “Bernie” Works

  • Soil temperatures were warmer than normal in mid-November

    Soil temperatures were above normal in mid-November, according to Jennie Atkins, the Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Genomic study explores evolution of gentle ‘killer bees’ in Puerto Rico

    A genomic study of Puerto Rico’s Africanized honey bees – which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” – reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. According to the researchers, these changes likely contributed to the bees’ rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years.

  • Cangellaris named vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost

    Andreas Cangellaris has been selected by Chancellor Robert Jones to be the Urbana campus’s next vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost. Cangellaris, the dean of the College of Engineering, will start in his new role Jan. 16, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility

    Exposure to the phytoestrogen genistein prior to conception may adversely affect female fertility and pregnancy outcomes, depending on the dosage and duration of exposure, a new study in mice by scientists at the University of Illinois suggests.

  • Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach

    A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful bacteria in the gut.

  • 2018-19 Avery Brundage scholarships available

    University of Illinois students who excel in both academics and athletics are encouraged to enter the 2018-19 Avery Brundage Scholarship competition. Scholarship applications can be submitted online. The deadline for submission is  Feb. 6. 

  • Paper: ‘No money down’ bankruptcies prevalent among the poor, minorities

    Bankruptcy attorneys are increasingly encouraging clients to file for the more expensive “no money down” option of Chapter 13 bankruptcy – a tactic that’s used more often with blacks than with whites, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert.

  • Team finds first wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois since 1984

    Researchers report the first sighting in 30 years of a wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois. The discovery may be a sign of hope for this state-endangered species, or the animal could be the last of its kind to have survived in Illinois without human intervention, the researchers say.

  • Researchers put new spin on old technique to engineer better absorptive materials

    A team of University of Illinois bioengineers has taken a new look at an old tool to help characterize a class of materials called metal organic frameworks – MOFs for short. MOFs are used to detect, purify and store gases, and could help solve some of the worlds most challenging energy, environmental and pharmaceutical challenges – they can even pull water molecules straight from the air to provide relief from droughts.

  • School of Music faculty performing Disaster Relief Concert

    Several faculty musicians from the School of Music will perform a concert this weekend with donations going to help victims of natural disasters in Mexico and Puerto Rico. The concert is 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 12, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Urbana-Champaign, 309 W. Green St., Urbana.

  • Illinois music school, Krannert Center celebrating Thelonious Monk

    The University of Illinois School of Music and Krannert Center for the Performing Arts are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Thelonious Monk’s birth by staging performances of Monk’s music and looking at his impact through a graduate seminar.

  • Deaths

    Jerry Dobrovolny ... Marisa Lu Rubenking Meador ... David L. Shipley

  • U. of I. program to help provide mental health services to high-need areas in Illinois

    A newly funded U. of I. initiative is expanding the number of behavioral health providers available to care for residents in medically underserved and rural communities.

  • Spurlock Museum hosts ‘Music at Illinois,’ a lecture by Joe Rank

    Spurlock Museum of World Cultures and the Illinois Alumni Association will present “Music at Illinois,” a special program on popular music written especially for or about the university. The free program will be presented by retired Alumni Association Vice President Joe Rank at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, at Spurlock Museum, 600 S. Gregory Drive, Urbana.

     

  • Study: Serving water with school lunches could prevent child, adult obesity

    Encouraging children to drink water with their school lunches could prevent more than half a million cases of child obesity and overweight -- and trim the medical and societal costs by more than $13 billion, a new study suggests.

  • Hall receives American Institute of Architects award for lifetime achievement, service

    Gaines Hall, an associate dean emeritus in the College of Fine and Applied Arts, received the 2017 Gold Medal Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects Illinois Council. The Gold Medal Honor Award is the organization’s highest honor, recognizing exemplary contributions to the discipline and profession of architecture.

  • Stem cells from muscle could address diabetes-related circulation problems

    Stem cells taken from muscle tissue could promote better blood flow in patients with diabetes who develop peripheral artery disease, a painful complication that can require surgery or lead to amputation.

  • November Dance features dance exchange program piece

    The November Dance performance will feature a work by Latvian choreographer Olga Zitluhina, created during a cultural exchange with the University of Illinois dance department.

  • University of Illinois Press to celebrate its centennial in 2018

    In 2018, the University of Illinois Press will mark its 100th anniversary with numerous events in Champaign-Urbana, Chicago and Springfield. A founding member of the Association of American University Presses in 1937, the UIP has published more than 4,500 books in its first century.

  • Month was state’s 10th-wettest October since 1895

     The statewide average precipitation in Illinois for October was 4.94 inches, 1.70 inches above normal, and the 10th-wettest October since 1895, said Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

     

  • Deaths

    Bernadine Carter ... Kathleen M. Dysart ... Toby Yale Kahr

  • Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymers

    Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental contaminants.

  • University of Illinois System launches fundraising campaigns with $3.1 billion goal

    The University of Illinois System has officially launched its largest, and most ambitious, comprehensive fundraising initiative that aims to raise $3.1 billion over the next five years to support students, faculty and academic and research programs and facilities. 

    This initiative is built on individual campaigns for each of the System’s universities in Chicago, Springfield and Urbana-Champaign that were officially launched during campus-based kickoff events in October.

  • Facebook research manager to speak at School of Information Sciences Research Showcase

    A Facebook user experience researcher will be the keynote speaker Nov. 8 at the School of Information Sciences Research Showcase.

    Funda Kivran-Swaine is a research manager at Facebook who has worked in user experience design and whose research focuses on computer-mediated communication. She will give the keynote address at 1 p.m. Nov. 8 in Illini Union Rooms A and B.

  • Lecture, open houses planned to celebrate Child Development Lab’s 75th anniversary

    A lecture by educational psychologist Kathleen Gallagher is among the events planned to celebrate the Child Development Laboratory's 75th anniversary.

  • From pythons and ferrets to coughing parrots: Adventures in exotic animal medicine

    Working with exotic animals in the Small Animal Clinic involves a lot of thinking on my feet. Each type of animal comes with unique needs and challenges. Parrots often have nutritional deficiencies and, like humans, can develop atherosclerosis – the result of a poor diet and too much sedentary time. (We sometimes refer to them as “perch potatoes.”) Reptiles and mammals tend to develop fungal infections on their skin. Birds, snakes and mammals need stimulation and like to explore – with sometimes tragic results.

  • Passes for 20th annual Ebertfest on sale Nov. 1

    Passes for the 20th annual Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, coming in April, go on sale Nov. 1.

  • Deaths

    Alfred Broccardo

  • What should we make of Russia’s revolution now?

    A U. of I. history professor takes a fresh look at the Russian Revolution on its centennial.

  • Researchers look to patterns to envision new engineering field

    The phenomenon that forms interference patterns on television displays when a camera focuses on a pattern like a person wearing stripes has inspired a new way to conceptualize electronic devices. Researchers at the University of Illinois are showing how the atomic-scale version of this phenomenon may hold the secrets to help advance electronics design to the limits of size and speed. 

  • Street closures announced for Homecoming parade

    Traffic patterns in the campus area will be affected by the annual Homecoming Parade, which takes place Friday, Oct. 27 from 6 to 7 p.m.

  • Stemlike cells at tumor perimeter promote new blood vessels to feed tumor growth

    Stemlike cells at the edge of melanoma tumors secrete factors to promote blood-vessel growth, allowing the cancer to grow and spread.

  • Events explore how technology, creativity interact to imagine the future

    A series of events at the University of Illinois called Speculative Futures will bring artists together with technology innovators with the goal of sparking new creative projects at the intersection of computer science and science fiction.

  • University of Illinois to honor its only Medal of Honor awardee

    The University Library will honor the only University of Illinois alumnus to receive the Medal of Honor.

  • Education Justice Project receives $1 million Mellon grant

    The Education Justice Project at the University of Illinois is expanding its academic programs for men in prison with the support of a three-year, $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

  • Serpents of the Badlands

    Tchk-tchk-tchktchk

    I stop dead in my tracks. Despite the howling prairie winds, that unmistakable sound cuts through the bluster and into my ears. My eyes search the ground, scanning through the prairie grasses, yucca, scoria and prickly pear. Nothing.

  • Illinois soil moisture improved in October

    Soil moisture levels improved throughout the state during the first half of October, said Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at the U. of I.

  • Scientists: Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissions

    Vastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report in the journal Nature Climate Change.

  • Deaths

    Nancy L. Davis ... The Rev. James “Jim” Patrick Fitzsimmons ... Hüseyin Leblebici ... Melvin Rothbaum ... Marcia Lynne Siders

  • Summer Study: Program provides undergrads with research experience

    This summer, 10 undergraduate students performed research using advanced imaging and microscopy technologies through the Discoveries in Bioimaging Research Experience for Undergraduates.

  • LAS in C-U: Liberal arts fair connects students with internships

    Fall semester fair helps students find local employers.

  • Hear My Voice: News project makes space for inclusive conversation

    Journalism project creates a space for dialogue.

  • Undergrads choose their own adventure in this wildlife research group

    Don’t be fooled by the name, the wildlife and chronic wasting disease research group has a broader mission than you might think. Yes, the research focuses on white-tailed deer, primarily, and on CWD, a baffliing affliction of deer and elk. But for the dozens of undergraduate students who have joined this collaborative effort over the years, the group also is a portal, of sorts, to wide-ranging adventures in research.

  • Interactive Projects

    Interactive art studio at University of Illinois teaches students coding, building circuits

  • Social Work Ambassadors: Students welcome peers to their field of study

    Social Work Ambassadors promote the School of Social Work programs, courses to students curious about the major and the careers available to alumni with degrees in the field.

  • LabEscape: Science feeds adventure through escape room

    Escape the room if you can, but the physics is inescapable.

  • Illinois scientist named Packard Fellow

    Pinshane Huang, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 18 early career researchers to receive 2017 Packard Fellowships from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.