blog navigation

Physical Sciences

blog posts

  • Chemist Herbert S. Gutowsky, pioneer of MRI, dies at 80

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Herbert S. Gutowsky, a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Illinois and a pioneer in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, died Jan. 13 at Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana. He was 80 years old.

  • Engineering Open House set for March 3, 4

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Remote-controlled robots rescuing "hostages" while running an obstacle course, wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, and more than 150 exhibits ranging from spacecraft design to shape-memory metals are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 80th annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Three professors named fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois researchers - Robert M. Fossum, Hugh M. Robertson and Peter G. Wolynes - are among 283 scientists who will be recognized Feb. 19 (Saturday) as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during the association's annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • Obesity researcher to give public lecture March 30

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Internationally known obesity researcher Richard Lee Atkinson will discuss the prospects for effective treatment in a public lecture at 7:30 p.m. March 20 at the University of Illinois. The lecture is free and will be in Room 150 of the Animal Sciences Laboratory, 1207 W. Gregory, Urbana.

  • State finals of Science Olympiad to be held April 29 on campus

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 29 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Sullivan receives Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Jeremiah D. Sullivan, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and former director of the UI's Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security, has been selected as the 2000 recipient of the Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from the American Physical Society.

  • Physicist Phillips receives Bouchet Award from American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Philip W. Phillips, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the 2000 recipient of the Edward A. Bouchet Award from the American Physical Society.

  • Physicist Gordon Baym elected to American Philosophical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Gordon A. Baym, the Center for Advanced Study Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois, has been elected to the American Philosophical Society.

  • Simple and inexpensive, an artificial nose senses smell by seeing colors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Imagine a small slip of paper that can sniff out odors such as sour milk, illegal drugs, environmental pollutants, poisonous gases or deadly toxins simply by changing color.

  • Hassan Aref honored for 'pioneering contributions' by American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Hassan Aref, professor and head of the department of theoretical and applied mechanics at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the 2000 recipient of the Otto Laporte Award from the American Physical Society.

  • 'Are We Alone?' to be topic of astronomy's Icko Iben Distinguished Lecture

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Steven Beckwith, the director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, will present the third talk in the department of astronomy's Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. Oct. 4 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "Are We Alone?," is free and open to the public.

  • Microbial transport at Yellowstone: by land, sea or air?

  • Unified theory relates microbial metabolism to lab and field

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- The ability to describe the rates at which microbial populations metabolize in the natural environment has been limited by the lack of a general theory of microbial kinetics. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois have found an approach that holds significant promise for extending the results of laboratory experiments to better understand microbial metabolism in nature.

  • Super-big superconducting magnet to be moved into laboratory Dec. 13

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A superconducting magnet 14 feet in diameter and weighing more than 80,000 pounds will be moved into the high-bay area of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 23 E. Stadium Drive, Champaign, beginning at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday (Dec. 13).

  • Strange quark contribution to proton structure yields surprising result

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Scientists seeking to confirm earlier measurements of the strange quark's contribution to the proton's magnetic moment have found several surprises, instead.

  • 'First-look' results with spectro-radiometer: All systems 'Go'

  • Pioneer in magnetic resonance imaging to receive National Academy of Sciences Award

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Paul C. Lauterbur, a pioneer in the development of magnetic resonance imaging and director of the Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory at the University of Illinois, will receive the 2001 National Academy of Sciences Award for Chemistry in Service to Society.

  • Amtrak official to speak on future of high-speed rail initiative

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Michael Franke, assistant vice president and program director of AmtrakÕs Midwest Regional Rail Initiative, will discuss the initiative at a talk at noon Feb. 8 in Room 3269 of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, 405 N. Mathews Ave., Urbana.

  • Time capsule to be opened at Engineering Open House

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots racing through a maze, the unearthing of a 26-year-old time capsule, and more than 150 fun-filled exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 81st annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Two researchers elected to the National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Two University of Illinois researchers -- Karl Hess and Thomas S. Huang -- have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

  • Department head David Daniel to be next dean of engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- David E. Daniel, the head of the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next dean of the College of Engineering, pending approval of the UI Board of Trustees at its meeting today in Urbana.

  • State finals of Illinois Science Olympiad to be held April 7

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 7 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Physics professor named to NATO Science Committee

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Jeremiah D. Sullivan, professor and head of physics at the University of Illinois, has been appointed to the Advisory Panel of the Security-Related Civil Science and Technology Sub-Program by the NATO Science Committee. The appointment, which begins in September, is for four years.

  • Physics professor wins Guggenheim Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Dale J. Van Harlingen, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and a researcher at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, has won a 2001 Guggenheim Fellowship.

  • State championship of Rube Goldberg Machine Contest to be held May 12

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The Illinois State Championship Rube Goldberg Machine Contest for High Schools will be held in the Illini Union, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 12.

  • AAAS Fellows elected

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Four University of Illinois researchers Paul D. Coleman, Richard I. Gumport, Jean-Pierre Leburton and Bruce R. Schatz are among 288 scientists elected as 2001 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • New crash analysis system helps investigators target main cause of airplane accidents

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A new crash analysis system is helping accident investigators shed more light on the main causal factor of aviation accidents: human error.

  • Engineered strategies to mitigate global warming could influence biosphere

  • Huang elected to Chinese Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thomas S. Huang, the William L. Everitt Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering.

  • Nanotube 'peapods' have tunable electronic properties, scientists say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. First came fullerenes, those cage-like molecules of 60 carbon atoms bound in a ball. Then came long, thin soda straws of carbon atoms called nanotubes. Now there are fullerenes nested within nanotubes, like so many peas in a pod.

  • Evidence of carbon-silicon compound found in living colony of diatoms

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Evidence of a carbon-silicon compound found in a living colony of diatoms could lead to a variety of beneficial applications, from low-cost synthesis of high-performance materials to therapeutic treatments for osteoporosis.

  • Rauchfuss to receive the ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry from the American Chemical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thomas B. Rauchfuss, professor of chemistry and director of the School of Chemical Sciences at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the 2002 recipient of the ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry from the American Chemical Society.

  • Baym wins Hans A. Bethe Prize from the American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Gordon A. Baym, Center for Advanced Study Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the 2002 recipient of the Hans A. Bethe Prize from the American Physical Society.

  • Bill Nye the Science Guy among attractions at Engineering Open House March 8, 9

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots fighting for possession of a bowling ball, lively talks by Bill Nye the Science Guy, and more than 150 fun-filled exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 82nd annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • State finals of Illinois Science Olympiad to be held April 6

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 6 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Distinguished Cal-Tech astronomer to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Wallace L.W. Sargent, the Ira S. Bowen Professor of Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, will present the fourth talk in the department of astronomys Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. April 24 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "Large Optical Telescopes: The Next Generation," is free and open to the public.

  • Harry Drickamer. pioneer in pressure tuning studies dies

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Harry G. Drickamer, a pioneer in the field of pressure tuning studies, which led to advances in the study of molecular, atomic and electronic properties, died Monday (May 6) at Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill. He was 83 years old.

  • Zukoski named next vice chancellor for research

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Zukoski, professor and head of the chemical engineering department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next vice chancellor for research of the Urbana campus.

  • Boppart named one of the world's top young innovators by Technology Review

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Stephen A. Boppart, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen as one of the world's 100 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, the world's oldest technology magazine.

  • Professor receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at White House

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Gammie, a professor of physics and of astronomy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was among 60 young researchers named as recipients of the 2001 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. Gammie received his award July 12 in a White House ceremony.

  • Grainger gifts fund programs to explore promising new technologies

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Revolutionary research into the fundamentals of electrical power and other promising areas of engineering will be emerging from the laboratories of the University of Illinois College of Engineering, thanks to three new major gifts from The Grainger Foundation of Lake Forest, Ill.

  • Emeritus professor wins top honor from Materials Research Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Howard K. Birnbaum, a professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2002 recipient of the Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society. The award will be presented Dec. 4 at the MRS meeting in Boston.

  • Distinguished Berkeley astronomer to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- William J. Welch, a professor of electrical engineering and of astronomy at the University of California at Berkeley, will present the fifth talk in the department of astronomy's Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. Oct. 28 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," is free and open to the public.

  • Illinois professor named 2002 Packard Fellow

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Neil L. Kelleher, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 20 U.S. researchers named 2002 Packard Fellows in natural sciences by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  • Consortium to design next-generation nuclear research reactors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has teamed with other Big Ten Universities to enhance existing university research reactor facilities and to design the next generation of nuclear reactors for research and education.

  • Holonyak to receive institute's highest honor

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been selected as the 2003 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Medal of Honor.

  • Illinois professor awarded the 2002/3 Wolf Prize in Physics

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Anthony J. Leggett, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as a recipient of the 2002/3 Wolf Prize in physics. He shares the prize with Bertrand I. Halperin of Harvard University.

  • Engineering Open House showcases student talent

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots fighting for possession of helium balloons, and more than 130 fun-filled exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 83rd annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Two Illinois professors elected to National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois researchers - Joseph E. Greene and Peter W. Sauer - have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering, the academy announced today.

  • Engineering professor named Carnegie Scholar

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Michael Loui, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.