Wildlife Medical Clinic Adopt a Resident Campaign

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Wildlife Medical Clinic Adopt a Resident Campaign

Why Adopt a Wildlife Medical Clinic Resident?

 

Most of our residents are past patients who were injured and unable to fly. They were treated with the intent of release into the wild, however, medical complications arose which eventually prevented them from achieving a full recovery. Each resident has his or her own story.

Our residents serve as ambassadors to the public and help to teach the importance of caring for our environment and the wildlife we share it with. Residents travel with us to grade schools, wildlife events, and even museums to teach people that it is crucial that we make an effort to maintain the natural order of our environment.

Your contribution will help to support their care.

Which of our fine-feathered friends would you like to adopt for $75 per year?

Question 1

Odin, Red-Tailed Hawk

Odin was found in Fairbury, Ill. and was suffering from emaciation, a broken right wing, anemia, and an acute parasitic infection.  He was so young at the time, he hadn't even grown his red tail feathers yet.  Complications resulting in arthritis in his right wing left him unable to fly. 
 

Question 2

Nokomis, Great Horned Owl

Nokomis came to the WMC as a fledging. It is unknown whether he fell from his nest, or was abandoned by his mother.  Nokomis has an unusually docile demeaner for a Great Horned Owl. As a species these owls are typically very vocal and aggressive. It was decided that Nokomis could clearly not be able to defend his territory in the wild.
 

Question 3

Noel, Saw-Whet Owl

Noel came to the WMC unable to use her left wing.  Afters several weeks of care and diagnostics peformed by a team of students, she was diagnosed with irreparable left radial nerve paralysis, which left her flightless and, therefore, unreleasable.  Northern Saw Whet Owls are the smallest owls in Illinois, at 18 cm long with a 43 cm wingspan.  They are named after the sound of their call, which is said to resemble a saw being sharpened with a whetstone.
 

Question 4

Kikuna, our new Kookaburra

Our newest resident, Kikuna, is a Laughing KookaburraHe was transferred to the WMC from a zoological collection after a right foot injury, and the arthritis which resulted, left with him with special perch and cage needs. Kookaburras are a member of the Kingfisher family and they are native to Australia.  They are most commonly known for their laughing call.
 
With your adoption, we'd like to send you a t-shirt, color photo, an information sheet on your resident, a certificate of adoption, and continued updates in the WMC newsletters.

With your adoption, we'd like to send you a t-shirt, color photo, an information sheet on your resident, a certificate of adoption, and continued updates in the WMC newsletters.

Which size t-shirt would you prefer?

requiredWhich size t-shirt would you prefer?
 
 
 
 
 

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